Criminal Justice News

Sunday, January 29, 2006

Seven Signs of Terrorism

Below is a link to an information video entitled, "7 Signs of Terrorism." The video was researched, developed, and produced by the students, staff and alumni of the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy in Aurora, Illinois. The video, commissioned by the Illinois Terrorism Task Force was produced at no cost to taxpayers of the State of Illinois.

The purpose of the video is make citizens aware of the seven signs they should look for if they suspect a terrorism plot is being planned or underway. The video is also designed to assist citizens become active participants in protecting our homeland effort. Subject matter presented in the video includes information about terrorists conducting surveillance, acquiring supplies, and going through trial runs of an attack.

Click to see the “Homeland Security Begins at Home”

About the Author

About the AuthorLieutenant Raymond E. Foster retired from the Los Angeles Police Department after 24 years of service. He is the author of “Police Technology” (Prentice Hall, July 2004) and number articles on technology, leadership, terrorism and policing. Raymond is a part-time lecture at California State University, Fullerton and a part-time faculty advisor at the Union Institute and University. He has three current book projects. They are on terrorism, policing and leadership. Raymond’s complete CV can be viewed at Criminal Justice Profile and he can be reached by email at raymond@hitechcj.com or through the Criminal Justice Online Forum.

Monday, January 16, 2006

Cellular Telephone Purchases Raise suspicions

In both California and Texas, the purchase of prepaid cellular telephones by suspicious person has been reported to local and federal authorities. On December 31, 2005, store employees in Hemet, California reported the purchase of 150 prepaid telephones to local and federal authorities. Early that month, in Midland, Texas, store employees reported that six suspicious individuals attempted to purchase 60 telephones.

A copy of the incident report (unconfirmed) prepared by the Midland Police Department is available here.

According to ABC new, federal authorities have begun an investigation into the purchase of large quantities of pre-paid or disposable cellular telephones. Retail and online outlets offer sales and activation of pre-paid cellular telephones which do not require a contract or credit check. The ready access and anonymity offered by these devices make them attractive to criminals and perhaps even terrorists.

As a means of communication pre-paid telephones offer several tactical advantages. First, they provide high-tech, virtually untraceable, communications gear. Because they do not require a contract or credit check, almost anyone can purchase one, under almost any name. Tracing back a number to an individual may well become virtually impossible. Furthermore, the low price provides the additional tactical advantage of secure communications because criminals and/or terrorists can change devices and numbers thereby avoiding traditional wiring taps.

An additional threat to American security may be the use of cellular telephones as a means to remotely detonate explosives. Remote detonation gives terrorists other tactical advantages. Remote detonation can occur by either re-wiring the cellular telephone so that when it is called instead of ringing the electrical current is used for detonation. Also, the alarm clock we typically use to remind us of the time can be used as the timing device for the detonation.

Remote detonation is used to time events, allow for a target to pass near a pre-positioned device, allow a device to be moved into position, or provide a delay in activation for escape. It is suspected that cellular telephones were used as a means of remote detonation in both the Madrid and London bombings. Remote detonation does not necessarily preclude a suicide bomber. By remote, it is meant that the time of detonation is pre-determined. It may well be that the London bombers were so well synchronized because the explosions were remotely timed by pre-setting a cellular alarm clock.

Law enforcement officials use a number of devices to investigate and counter the tactical advantage. For instance, Triggerfish is a relatively old-style technology that can home in on a cellular telephone when they are in use. However, this still requires that law enforcement know the cellular telephone number they are trying to track. Again, this highlights the difficulty in pursuing investigative leads on disposable cellular telephones. Additionally, there is technology available and in use which creates a limited cellular telephone dead zone. This technology might be useful in creating a “dead zone” under certain circumstances. As an example, a dead zone can be created by jamming the cellular frequencies after one attack in order to prevent secondary devices. Unfortunately, jamming on interrupts all incoming and outgoing calls – it doesn’t discriminate between terrorists and first responders; and, jamming does not effect timing devices.

As it develops this information will be updated at Criminal Justice Online in the open source intelligence section of the forum.

Thursday, January 12, 2006

Marine Corps Intelligence

Part of the mission of Criminal Justice Online is to cull through the Internet and bring you timely, interesting and useful open source intelligence. Recently, the United States Marine Corps published its Marine Corps Intelligence Civillian Career Development Guide.

Excerpt from the guide:

In this 21st century, the Marine Corps faces mission and management challenges that call for a new responsiveness to career development. Decreasing resources and rightsizing are just two of the challenges mandating that the human resources of the organization be developed and managed to meet increasing workload expectations.

It is imperative that all members of Marine Corps Intelligence maintain and expand theirprofessional skills to maximize individual and collective potential. A career developmentplan is essential to ensure employees’ training and development activities are strategically aligned to the mission.

The Marine Corps has established procedures and tools to educate, train, and retain its workforce to ensure that its staff has the ability to provide timely, objective, and cogent military intelligence to the nation’s warfighters, policy makers, and acquisition community; to ensure that employees have the opportunity to pursue fulfilling and challenging careers; and to maximize the potential of its people through planned career development.Both supervisors and employees share the responsibility for developing a workforce with the skills to make an expanded contribution to the mission—a contribution linking individual work satisfaction and performance to accomplishing goals and meeting the challenges of Marine Corps Intelligence.

To be successful employees are expected to take a positive approach to career development. Marine Corps Intelligence offers a competency-based training curriculum that is linked to the knowledge, skills, and abilities required for successful job performance. All employees are encouraged to participate in scheduled training courses, workshops, seminars, and on-the-job developmental assignments designed to assist them in reaching their full potential.

Employees are also encouraged to work with mentors who can help guide them along their chosen paths.This guide provides information on the Career Development Program, as well as other educational opportunities available to both civilian and military personnel.

The entire guide can be downloaded here.

Sunday, January 08, 2006

I wanna be a detective!

That’s something a police sergeant or lieutenant hears from every street cop. It seems few want to spend their career pushing a black and white around their beat. While working the streets is a great job, eventually you come a point that you want to do something else. Perhaps, you want to be a detective. Here’s some good advice on getting a detective spot.

You’re career is under your control. If it is drifting it is because you are letting it drift. So, take the wheel. A great first step is to get an undergraduate degree. Take a look at my article Criminal Justice: Why and How. Then, consider, an interview panel doesn’t care what courses you took. They aren’t going to ask you about your undergraduate class in criminological theory. However, they are going to know, and you are going to tell them that an undergraduate degree says:

1. You can work independently.
2. You can work in groups.
3. You can manage competing resources.
4. You can manage a long term plan.
5. You are capable of research
6. You can read and write at the college level.
7. You were exposed to different cultures

Doesn’t that sound like a first class detective? While you are working on your undergraduate degree work on your skills as a police officer. About halfway through my probation on the department I responded to a homicide scene. A man had been stabbed to death on a street corner. Like the typical blue suit, I put the tape up, started the log and called the detectives. They came and investigated. Even though it happened in broad daylight – no one saw a thing.

The detectives detected and then went away. I spent the next few weeks going back to that street corner. There were several retired men who hung out nearby. Even though I was a much younger and a different race, I talked to them everyday. We chatted about boxing, cars and other stuff. I knew they knew who did the murder. After several weeks of chatting I asked the question. One of the men said, “Officer, if I knew, I’d tell you.” He emphasized the you. Another man said, “You would?” The second man told me everything. In 24 hours, the suspect and the weapon were in custody. The point is that detective work is about talking to people. Hone your skills now.

Go into the detective squad bay and ask for some work! Ask them if there is a witness you can interview during your shift or something simple you can do. At first they will have you running down supplemental property reports between radio calls. But, after a while they will give you very cool stuff to do. And, they will remember. You are putting in your time, learning the ropes and making contacts. If you work graveyards, before you go home, go ask.

Think about working traffic. Traffic investigations are relatively unknown fast-track to detectives. Every traffic accident is a crime scene. You recover evidence, interview witness, make diagrams, draw conclusions, etc. But, unlike your typical patrol investigation, a traffic investigation is often handled from crime scene to filing by the traffic cop. And, a fatal traffic accident is a potential homicide. Where else can you get homicide experience working in uniform?

So, you wanna be a detective? You can, but you have to work for it.

About the Author
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster retired from the Los Angeles Police Department after 24 years of service. He is the author of “Police Technology” (Prentice Hall, July 2004) and number articles on technology, leadership, terrorism and policing. Raymond is a part-time lecture at California State University, Fullerton and a part-time faculty advisor at the Union Institute and University. He has three current book projects. They are on terrorism, policing and leadership. Raymond’s complete CV can be viewed at Criminal Justice Profile and he can be reached by email raymond@hitechcj.com or through the Criminal Justice Online Forum.

CEDP Grants

As a sometimes grant reviewer, I thought I would add some information that you might final useful. While this is particularly applicable to the Department of Homeland Security technology transfer grant, it is also useful for all grants.

  1. This particular grant is a VERY simple application. If you qualify and can use the equipment you should apply.
  2. Most grants are competitive. And, the raters are human beings. The first applications that are rejected or scored lower are those grants that simply fail to include all of the requested information. Do not leave a section blank. If the application asks for something like “evidence of site control” you MUST submit something that indicates you have site control. Or, perhaps a city council resolution….if it says you have to have it, you have to have it.
  3. Some grantors have grant conferences. Indeed, often they give points for attendance. If there is one, and you want to be competitive you should send someone. Not only do you receive the points, but you receive information on how to complete the application. The primary writer need not attend to get the points – but, you also make contact with the grantor (the human beings making the decisions). Like all of life, it is often who you know, not what you know.
  4. Attempt to contact the grantor before you submit. Even if there is no “bidders conference” (generally described in No. 3), you can often get clues on how the grants are scored. Think of it as getting information from the teacher about the test before he or she grades it. If you know what they are looking for, you will be more successful.
  5. De-brief successful and unsuccessful grants with the grantor. Grant writing is a learning process.
  6. Do not apply for a grant just because you can. That often comes through in the grant, restricts the awards to the agencies truly in need and most importantly, wastes your resources.

Good luck

Friday, January 06, 2006

Hi Tech Criminal Justice Vaults in Search Rankings

January 2, 2006

After an intensive month of web re-design, Hi Tech Criminal Justice Online announced that its search engine rankings are have dramitically increase. Raymond E. Foster, the CEO of Hi Tech Criminal Justice Online stated that, "the most recent rankings from an MSN search demonstrate that good content, design and marketing pay off." Hi Tech Criminal Justice Online reported the following key term search rankings from MSN:

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Number Five Slots
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Number Six
Criminal Justice Courses Online
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Number Nine
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Number Ten
LAPD

Tuesday, January 03, 2006

Televised Presentation on CyberCrime

The OLLI project at California State University Dominguez Hills is funded by a grant from the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute and is intended to provide university-level discussion of important topics to seniors and others who are limited in mobility or who cannot travel to a university to attend such lectures and discussions. OLLI has been offering programs since the spring 2003, which makes spring 2006 their sixth series.

The program is one-hour in length and is hosted. All broadcasts are live from the university television studio in Carson, California, aired on cable channel LA 36 on Wednesdays from 1:00 - 2:00 PM, starting February 8 and ending May 10. Other cable channels in the greater Los Angeles area carry the broadcast live, including channel 56 in Pasadena.

Estimated viewing audience in the city of Los Angeles alone is estimated to be approximately 75,000 to 125,000. The broadcasts are interactive, featuring viewers' participation via telephone and email. Each broadcast includes clips from film and television clips chosen by the presenter to illustrate the topic, a pedagogic method used to engage “seasoned” learners. Each presentation is supported by a Website with resources for learning more on a topic and interacting with others. OLLI archives the presentations on their website, where past presentations are currently available for viewing.

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA has been invited to participate in our spring 2006 televised lecture series entitled "The Law and Criminal Investigation in Film Television, and Literature." This series of one-hour presentations is part of a project to expand learning-in-retirement experiences for seniors. The series intends to examine law and criminal investigation from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Foster, the author of “Police Technology (Prentice Hall, July 2004)” will appear on March 15, 2006, from 1PM to 2PM and will be presenting “Cyber Crime.

Police Technology Reviewed on Amazon

Recent review on my book Police Technology

An absolute necessity for the War on Terrorism by Police Organizations, January 2, 2006
Reviewer: Michael O. Kelley (Elizabethtown, KY)

I recently taught a police technology course at a local community college using Raymond Foster's Police Technology book as the base reference for the course and then punctuated the book will information and exercises from the accompanying website. Outstanding! The website is very informative, current and relevant. Several of the practicing law enforcement personnel including senior supervisors and managers had their eyes opened to the technology available to them now and the future potential for the technology to improve the service they provide their communities, understand contemporary issues in law enforcement and may compelling arguments to their respective governing counsels for funding and technology initiatives. Great book - understood and applied by students at all levels of experience.

Mike Kelley
michaeloharakelley@comcast.net
Criminal Justice Professor

Reviewer: Global Security (New Jersey)
Anyone in the Criminal Justice Field will want to read this book. Raymond Foster has provided a comprehensive book on how technology affects today's thinking in Law Enforcement.

I read the introduction to his book on my Internet Radio Show, Global Security, on www.voice.voiceamerica.com It is chilling. It begins by telling the reader how a murderer hid behind technology. Thanks to new technology, the murderer was eventually caught. Raymond E. Foster the Author was the team leader.

Foster gives great examples of new technology being used today by Law Enforcement. I have already recommended this book to many of my associates to use as a guide for instruction.

Vic Plessner, Global Security Consultant,

Monday, January 02, 2006

Forums for Hi Tech Online Criminal Justice Courses and Resources

Introduction and Rules
One of the largest movements in the field of terrorism and criminal justice is Open Source Intelligence (OSINT). While this forum will eventually morph into having restricted areas, for the time being Hi Tech Criminal Justice Online is leaving this community open. Yes, there will be the occasional knucklehead, but it is up to the community and the moderators to evaluate and screen the information. As with any professional undertaking, it is expected that all community members will treat each other with respect.

Leadership in Criminal Justice
General Leadership Advice
Two of the most popular areas of the Hi Tech Criminal Justice Online are the Police Leadership and Military leadership sections so the staff made this forum is made available to discuss general leadership information and ideas.

Criminal Justice System
Enforcement
This forum is for the first part of the criminal justice system - enforcement, or policing.
Adjudication
The second part of the criminal justice system is adjudication. Prosecutors decide to move cases forward and try them.
Courts
The Courts referee between the adjudicators - prosecutors and defense. They also assign punishment once the case has been decided. Post here about courts.
Corrections
Post about corrections, the people who implement the court's decisions.

Terrorism
General information
Included in this forum are stories and general information about GWOT. Please be mindful of copyright laws!
Open Source Intelligence
A collection of postings, documents and information that is considered OSINT in the Global War on Terrorism

Technology
Basics and Theory
Question, answers and advice on "How Police Stuff Works!"
Strategic Information Systems and Technologies
For technologies like - Computer Aided Dispatch, NCIC 2002, Internet, Interoperability and Crime Analysis.
Tactical Technologies
Fingerprints, DNA, wiretaps, surveillance, disaster response and technologies in the street. Managing Technology
Grants, implementation and management

Criminal Justice Administration
Hiring and Promotion
This forum is for job opportunities and tips on the hiring and promotional process.
Grants
Information on grants, grant making and fundraising for the CJ administrator

Security
Security International
InternationalThe Global War on Terror (GWOT) has placed more responsibility on those in the security arena. As time passes, they are becoming full-partners with law enforcement and the criminal justice system, in general. This forum is for the discussion of international security issues.
Security Domestic
The Global War on Terror (GWOT) and placed more responsibility on those persons in the security arena. As time passes, they are becoming full-partners with law enforcement and the criminal justice system, in general. This forum is for the discussion of domestic security issues.

Education and Training
Education
This forum is for information on higher education. Post your questions and advice regarding undergraduate and graduate work. For a complete list courses from Hi Tech Criminal Justice Online visit "Criminal Justice Online Courses & Student Resources
Training
Post your training opportunities and feedback about same

Employment
Employment Opportunities
This forum is for posting employment opportunities for sworn and civilian personnel in the field of criminal justice.
Retirement Opportunities
This forum is for sworn and civilian personnel who are retired or nearing retirement. This is the place to post second career opportunities for criminal justice practitioners.
Off-duty Opportunities
This is intended to be a pretty free-wheeling space. Given modified work schedules (3/12, 4/10, etc.), sworn and civilian personnel are often looking to supplement their income and build for their retirement. You should research ANY opportunity or offer.

Patch Trading
For patch and memorabilia trading. Know your trading partner. We are not responsible for your trades.

About the Author
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster retired from the Los Angeles Police Department after 24 years of service. He is the author of “Police Technology” (Prentice Hall, July 2004) and number articles on technology, leadership, terrorism and policing. Raymond is a part-time lecture at California State University, Fullerton and a part-time faculty advisor at the Union Institute and University. He has three current book projects. They are on terrorism, policing and leadership. Raymond’s complete CV can be viewed at Criminal Justice Profile and he can be reached by email raymond@hitechcj.com or through the Criminal Justice Online Forum.

Sunday, January 01, 2006

Marine Corps Terrorism Survival Guide

On September 18, 2001, shortly after the terrorist attacks of 9-11, the United States Marine Corps published “The Individual’s Guide for Understanding and Surviving Terrorism.” This 138 page document outlines terrorism and terrorist incidents. It provides the reader with information on detecting terrorists, including practical tactics for detecting surveillance and general information on protection through awareness.

The guide also provides information on what to expect if taken hostage and offers advice on how a hostage should conduct themselves during hostage taking, imprisonment and rescue. A copy of the Guide is availabe at Hi Tech Criminal Justice's Homeland Security site. The Marine Corps' Terrorism guide, along with other open source intelligence is posted at the Homeland Security site and discussed on an Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) forum on Criminal Justice Online.

About the Author
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster retired from the Los Angeles Police Department after 24 years of service. He is the author of “Police Technology (Prentice Hall, July 2004) and number articles on technology, leadership, terrorism and policing. Raymond is a part-time lecture at California State University, Fullerton and a part-time faculty advisor at the Union Institute and University. He has three current book projects. They are on terrorism, policing and leadership.Raymond’s complete CV can be viewed at Criminal Justice Profile and he can be reached by email at mailto:raymond@hitechcj.com or on the Criminal Justice Online Forum.