Criminal Justice News

Tuesday, October 30, 2007

Tag me

Greetings:

My new book on leadership is up on Amazon. The book image hasn’t appear yet, but things are moving in the right direction. I would appreciate you visiting Amazon and “tagging” the product. This involves you identifying the product for search engines – words like leadership, leader, leading, business
leadership, etc., would be great tags. When it asks you why you have tagged it, you could say something like you are a “friend, business associate, colleague, etc.” and have seen my resume and know I am capable of writing a great book on leadership. Here’s the link:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1419674382/raymonefoster-20

If you want to review my resume you can go to
www.police-technology.net/raymond.foster.cv.html.

Thanks,

Raymond

Iraqi Police Learn Basics During Prep Course

By Spc. Shejal Pulivarti, USA
Special to American Forces Press Service

Oct. 30, 2007 - The Military
Police Platoon from Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, has developed a 10-day preparatory class to implement the basics for Iraqi police recruits before they attend the Baghdad Police Academy, which initiates them as official police officers. This course is designed to give police recruits a basic understanding on what their job will consist of, said Army Sgt. 1st Class Anthony Brinson, the MP Platoon's top sergeant.

The trainees waiting to attend the academy come from various stations in the surrounding area to learn basic
police skills, he added. It's an orientation, ensuring all new police cadets go into the academy with the same level of general knowledge.

"The
training covers basics on ethics, principles, Iraqi law, first aid, basic rifle marksmanship, responding to a crime scene, and search techniques in various scenarios," said Brinson, a Fort Lauderdale, Fla., native. "The recruits follow a structured daily schedule emphasizing teamwork and discipline."

The 10 days are spent introducing the material in the classroom and then actively applying what they've learned. The last two days consist of practical exercises that incorporate the entirety of the course.

"Everything learned has to be applied during the hands-on scenarios. The situations gradually get harder to test their understanding," Brinson said.

"Everything is a perishable skill; they have to practice it in order to retain it," he continued. "They understand the task; they are definitely learning what they need to know to be successful."

"The trainees get better every day. The course helps them become good IPs and work with the coalition forces to do our job," said Iraqi Police 1st Lt. Hesham Saman Ali Sauba Boor, a course instructor.

Each Iraqi
police station is responsible for sending an academy graduated officer to teach the new recruits. Military personnel rotate through as instructors from the MP Platoon and are assisted by Iraqi army liaison officers.

"Having the IP officers teach them accomplishes a lot; it mainly helps the Iraqi police force become self-sufficient," Brinson said. "It's another step in the progress to make security forces stronger."

As he watched the recruits successfully complete a bounding exercise, Brinson noted, "I see the trainees take more pride in themselves. This course is helping them to become a cohesive unit to accomplish the mission."

Staer Gabar Abedallah, a trainee, said he chose to become an Iraqi
police officer to serve his country, secure his community and stop the terrorists.

"The
training is a great opportunity to concentrate on training and help the Iraqi people move forward in self governance," said Stonington, Ill., native Army Sgt. David Ashbridge, a military police leader.

(Army Spc. Shejal Pulivarti is assigned to 1st Cavalry Division's 1st Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs Office.)

Monday, October 29, 2007

Love Caught Speeding

My wife, Janie, and I met when I was a police officer; I caught her speeding.

My heart became captive to her beauty and charm. My weapons held no defense against her prominent and penetrating eyes. It was if two souls had been wandering in the wilderness, lost and without hope, then coming upon a beautiful oasis. We both clung to each other like young voyagers on the high seas, captivated as the tide by a full moon.

Our voyage took us through exciting avenues of life; breathtaking dates on the sands of Lake Michigan as a billion stars applauded high overhead; laughter and tears at the junctions of life as our love carried us over smooth, then bumpy highways.

We still are kept warm by the never ending fire of that first encounter; when our hearts touched and produced a flame that sowed seeds of envy in the depths of a powerful Sun: warmth that keeps out the wintry blasts of approaching age.

Our love has become timeless!

Richard Neal Huffman

About the Author
Richard Neal Huffman was born the son of a sharecropper. At the age of two his parents migrated to southwest Michigan. At 20, Richard was drafted into the United States Army where he served as a medic. After discharge, he joined the National Guard and later the Army Reserves. Richard joined the Bangor Police Department and throughout his career he would serve as a patrol officer, training officer, sergeant, detective and assistant chief of police. Richard Neal Huffman’s first book, “Dreams in Blue: The Real Police,” is an autobiographical journey that takes the reader inside the world of the small town cop. He introduces the reader to people, situations, and a culture that is both interesting and unique. Richard’s second book, “Rubal,” is a fictional account of a Union soldier during the Civil War. Read more about Richard Neal Huffman’s work here.

Sunday, October 28, 2007

Army, Marines Release Counterinsurgency Manual

"Learn" and "adapt" are the key messages of the new Army and Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual, which just hit the streets. The Counterinsurgency Field Manual, FM 3-24 and Marine Corps Warfighting Publication 3-33.5, is a unique joint effort between the Army and Marines to put in place doctrine to help operators as they face the challenges of asymmetric warfare.

The manual codifies an important lesson of insurgencies: it takes more than the military to win. "There are more than just lethal operations involved in a counterinsurgency campaign," said Conrad Crane, director of the
U.S. Army Military History Institute, in Carlisle, Pa., and one of the leaders of the effort.

Download the Manual
http://www.military-writers.com/counterinsurgency_manual.html

Saturday, October 27, 2007

Popularity and Expansion of Online Criminal Justice Programs and Degrees

Let’s not fool ourselves here. Earning an online college degree is quite an achievement in itself. It is an acknowledgement by the student, that at some point in their work career, they made a choice to rise to the sound of their inner voice and seek a greater purpose.

For those who have chosen the path of public service, that inner voice could not be greater. Literally, that vocation can take shape in many forms. In recent years, the world of online education has seen a surge of interest in the field of Criminal Justice. There are many factors involved in this increase. On one end of the spectrum, the political state of the United States civil policies has helped to increase the hiring needs of this field. On the other end, television media and the public fascination with dramas set in and around the fields of Law, Criminal Justice, Forensics and crime in general can also be a significant catalyst.

Online criminal justice degrees are now available to online students in every state and these online degree programs are accredited by their regional accrediting boards. These online degrees are afforded the same respect by police and sheriff departments and correctional facilities. Many police departments encourage their employees in the field, to pursue advanced degrees in criminal justice, thus increasing their potential for advancement as well as their income.

Student at the beginning of their work career may see an online criminal justice degree as the beginning step to a secure career in law enforcement, at a correctional facility or as the first step in a journey to obtaining a masters in criminal justice. Some online programs are so highly regarded at providing such quality education in the field that these institutions have sought and gained the honor of granting a doctorate in criminal justice.

Yes, it is possible in this day and age to progress from bachelors, to masters, to a doctorate degree in criminal justice all in an online learning environment.The fields of study available to the online learner are increasing day by day as online colleges see new areas of growth and develop curriculum to meet these needs.

COMANCHE - 1ST ARMY / 7TH CAVALRY

Editor's Note: The article was written by a retired police officer.

Comanche was tough, fearless, handsome and hardcore - as well as the most famous survivor of the Battle of the Little Bighorn. In truth ... Comanche was not the only horse that survived ... Accounts from warriors at the Little Bighorn say some 7th Cavalry horses also survived and were taken by tribal warriors after the battle. Comanche, was badly wounded and had been left at the battlefield, giving rise to the "Lone Survivor" myth.

The most celebrated survivor of the 1876 Battle of the Little Bighorn was a small bay horse with a very big military service record. Comanche, 925 Lbs. And a 15 hands tall gelding of Mustang and Morgan breeding, ran with a wild horse band that was rounded up and sold to the U.S. Cavalry in Saint Louis in April 1868.

READ ON

Monday, October 22, 2007

California Law Enforcement Writers

October 22, 2007 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists nearly 800 state and local police officers who have written books. The Website added three California Law Enforcement officials who have authored books.

Steven D. Moss is a consultant to law enforcement agencies throughout California and an instructor at the San Diego Regional Law Enforcement Training Facility in Traffic Investigation and Collision Analysis. He designed and implemented revised field procedures for DUI and served as instructor in the techniques for attorneys and law enforcement agencies. He was a police officer for the San Diego Police Department from 1977 until his retirement in 2005. His assignments include patrol, collision, investigation bureau, drinking driver enforcement, off-road enforcement, motors/speed enforcement, detective - traffic investigation unit.

Steven D. Moss has an advanced POST certificate from the State of California and has qualified in both municipal and superior courts for the state of California as an expert witness in all facets of collision reconstruction. Steven Moss has a BPA and an MBA, both from National University. He is a general partner in the firm of C and M Collision Analysis and a college instructor in traffic investigation and collision analysis. Steven Moss is the co-author of Basic Collision Analysis and Scene Documentation.

Steve R. Willard is a 20-year member of the San Diego Police Department. A writer for law enforcement periodicals, Steven Willard also serves as the vice president of the San Diego Police Historical Association, which supplied the vintage photos for his Images of America, San Diego Police Department. Since joining the San Diego Police Department in 1985, Steve Willard has worked “patrol, crime prevention and the detective bureau. In addition to extensive expertise in forensic video and composite artistry and covert alarm systems, Vice President Willard holds a certificate in intermediate Crime Scene Investigation from California State University Long Beach and an advance certificate from the California Department of Justice. He has also obtained certificates in intermediate and advanced courses in fingerprint classification and identification through the Federal Bureau of Investigation.” He is also the author of America’s Finest: The History of San Diego City Law Enforcement.

According to the book description of Images of America,
San Diego Police Department, “The San Diego Police Department dates to 1889, when out-of-control crime forced the end of the highly ineffective city marshal’s office. With violence on every corner and Tombstone’s venerable Wyatt Earp running the marshals’ gambling interests, change was desperately needed. But the first days of the SDPD weren’t easy. Within two years of its formation, the city’s economy tanked, 36,000 of the town’s 40,000 citizens left, and the department’s newly appointed chief refused to take the job. Still, San Diego eventually developed into one of the nation’s largest cities and most popular tourist destination—a multifaceted metropolis perched between the extremes of Los Angeles and Mexico, the Pacific Ocean and the desert. Today more than 2,000 highly trained sworn SDPD officers, 700 support staff, and more than 1,000 volunteers form one of the world’s most innovative and internationally recognized police forces.”

Gary Hoving is the Chief Deputy of the San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Department. He is the author of Crime Scene Investigation: A Manual for Patrol Officers and Journey of Justice.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 780 police officers (representing 351 police departments) and their 1664
law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Thursday, October 18, 2007

Defense Department Consolidates, Redefines Abuse Policies

By Fred W. Baker III
American Forces Press Service

Oct. 18, 2007 - The Defense Department has consolidated 14 previous domestic abuse policies into one document that more clearly defines the roles and
training of those who deal with the problem. The new publication, "Domestic Abuse Involving DoD Military and Certain Affiliated Personnel," was introduced by senior officials this month to coincide with the department's observance of National Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

"Providing a safe and wholesome environment for our families is a key quality-of-life objective. Publication of this instruction is a significant milestone for the department of Defense and represents a major step forward in our efforts to prevent domestic abuse," said Leslye A. Arsht, deputy undersecretary of defense for
military community and family policy. "Domestic violence destroys families, scars children and harms military readiness. ... We will continue to work to ensure that every home is a safe home."

The publication more clearly defines roles and
training requirements for those the department calls "key responders," said Mike Hoskins, a special assistant in the Office of the Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy. Key responders include local commanders, law enforcement officials, legal representatives, health care providers, family advocacy staff and chaplains.

The publication is the result of an effort that started more than six years ago with a congressionally mandated task force formed to help the department stop
domestic violence within its ranks. After three years, the panel made nearly 200 recommendations to the department on how to improve its response to reports of domestic violence.

Most of the recommendations are addressed in the new publication, Hoskins said, and include:

-- The need for a comprehensive, coordinated community response to reports of abuse;

-- The requirement to seek agreements with civilian counterparts to increase information sharing regarding abuse incidents;

--
Training needed for key responders; and

-- The need for the Defense Department to conduct sound
criminal investigations of domestic abuse reported to the system.

Since the task force made its recommendations, there have been several initiatives and additional funding addressing
domestic violence within the department, Hoskins said. Also, initiatives were launched in cooperation with other federal agencies. For example, the Defense and Justice departments teamed to train victim advocates and law enforcement personnel, Hoskins said.

In 1998, the reported rate of spouse abuse in the Defense Department was about 20 per every 1,000 families. In 2006 that dropped by about half, for 313 reports of
domestic violence.

But, Hoskins said, "The true scope of the problem is difficult to understand." He said reporting has historically been inconsistent between agencies investigating incidents. Officials say
domestic violence is one of the most underreported crimes in the country.

"We shouldn't necessarily take comfort in reduced rates of
domestic violence. It is highly likely that is a good-news story, in that prevention, education and awareness efforts are working, but we need to be also cognizant of the possibility that we are making it more difficult for victims to come forward and receive assistance. So we have to interpret with caution those numbers," Hoskins said.

Hoskins said that reported victims of
domestic violence are all ages, sexes and military ranks, but the majority are women. A common misconception, he said, is that abuse can be caused by stress or deployments.

"I think some of the most common misperceptions are that it is caused by stress, anger, alcohol, deployment, and although abusers may certainly experience those, they do not cause domestic abuse. Individuals choose whether or not they are going to be abusive," Hoskins said. "In fact, if everyone in our system who experienced stress, anger, deployment in fact were abusive, we would have numbers that would be so high that we wouldn't know what to do with them."

Hoskins said sometimes victims are afraid to come forward because of the fear of damaging their spouse's
military career. He said a report of abuse doesn't necessarily mean an end to a career or the family, but that the report should be handled as any other reported crime.

"The Defense Department has made it very clear that victims will be treated with dignity and respect and that offenders will be held appropriately accountable," Hoskins said.

"The goals of all the programs in the system haven't changed. Those are to help people live healthy lifestyles and, in those cases where families want to stay together, the focus is on helping them stay together," he said. "What we encourage commanders to do is to respond to reports of domestic abuse as they would the credible reports of any other crime, and to initiate ... a law enforcement investigation to determine if a crime occurred," he said.

Criminal Justice Agencies Expand Search for Missing Persons

The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, NamUs, is the first national online repository for missing persons records and unidentified decedent cases. It was launched in July 2007 by the Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice.

NamUs is made up of two databases: Records of unidentified decedents (select "Unidentified Decedents”); and, missing persons reports (select “Missing Persons”).

Currently, the unidentified decedents database is searchable and available for medical examiners and coroners to upload their cases. The search capability of the missing persons database is in development; the site currently provides resources on State clearinghouses and other
criminal justice agencies.

In 2009, the two databases will be linked. Families, law enforcement agencies, other
criminal justice entities and the general public will be able to search for matches between missing persons and unidentified decedent records.
Visit the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System.

Tuesday, October 16, 2007

NIJ Funding Opportunities
The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) has recently issued the following solicitations. Please be aware that you must submit your application electronically using
Grants.gov. Instructions for the Grants.gov registration process are available at: www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp.

Body Armor for
Law Enforcement and Corrections (Posted 10/15/07)
Due Date: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.
Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Research and Development in the Area of Controlled Substances Detection and Analysis
(Posted 10/15/07)
Due Date: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.
Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Biometric Technologies (Posted 10/15/07)
Due Date: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.
Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Personal Protection Equipment (Posted 10/15/07)
Due Date: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.
Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Electronic Crime and Digital Evidence Recovery (Posted 10/15/07)
Due Date: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.
Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Information-Led Policing Research,
Technology Development, Testing, and Evaluation (Posted 10/15/07)
Due Date: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.
Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Research and Development in the
Forensic Analysis of Fire and Arson Evidence (Posted 10/15/07)
Due Date: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.
Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Geospatial
Technology (Posted 10/15/07)
Due Date: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.
Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Less Lethal Technologies (Posted 10/15/07)
Due Date: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.
Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Sensors and
Surveillance Technology (Posted 10/15/07)
Due Date: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.
Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Research and Development in
Forensic Anthropology and Forensic Odontology (Posted 10/15/07)
Due Date: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.
Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Forensic DNA Research and Development (Posted 10/15/07)
Due Date: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.
Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Communications Technology (Posted 10/15/07)
Due Date: November 14, 2007, 11:59 p.m. eastern time.
Full text of the Solicitation pdf format

Monday, October 15, 2007

Los Angeles County deploys COPLINK® to Support Crime Solving and Anti-Terrorism Initiatives Across the Region

October 15, 2007 --- Knowledge Computing Corp. today announced that its award-winning COPLINK® solution suite will be deployed to support Los Angeles County law enforcement through the Regional Terrorism Information and Integration System (RTIIS) consortium. This follows on the heels of successful deployments with the Los Angeles Police Department, Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department and other major regional deployments in California. The announcement was made today in conjunction with the 114th Annual International Association of Police Chiefs (IACP) conference in New Orleans, Louisiana.

"COPLINK’s proven performance solving crimes and thwarting
terrorism in Los Angeles, San Diego, and Orange County to date, combined with its national footprint serving over 600 jurisdictions across the country offers the most compelling value proposition to law enforcement agencies with information sharing and intelligence led policing initiatives,” said Robert Griffin, CEO of Knowledge Computing Corp. “We are pleased to expand our support across Los Angeles and increase the county’s success in thwarting crime and terrorism with COPLINK’s tactical lead generation and actionable intelligence capabilities.”

"This initiative will speed the discovery process in
criminal and terrorism investigations by discovering relationships and associations between criminal activity and suspects that would otherwise be difficult to detect,” said Commander John Radeleff of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. “This will help law enforcement agencies across Los Angeles County get violent and repeat offenders off the street faster.” Radeleff continued, “In addition, the RTISS initiative will increase our ability to share information with other neighboring agencies to catch criminals who operate across multiple jurisdictions.”

COPLINK provides unparalleled analysis and decision support for rapidly identifying criminal suspects, relationships and patterns that help solve crime and thwart
terrorism. Using a GJXDM compliant interface, it works by allowing vast quantities of structured and seemingly unrelated data - including data currently housed in various incompatible databases and records management systems - to be securely organized, consolidated and rapidly analyzed over a highly secure intranet-based platform.

One search using known or partial facts from an ongoing investigation can produce qualified leads that would otherwise be unapparent in seconds - a process that prior to COPLINK was not possible or often takes days or weeks to accomplish. Through sophisticated analytics, including powerful visualization tools, COPLINK builds "institutional memory," reduces knowledge gaps and prevents criminals from falling through the cracks.

COPLINK will be used for
law enforcement purposes only, utilizing 45 public data sources from an assortment of disparate records management systems used by law enforcement agencies across the county. Los Angeles County is the most populous in the United States. Police departments contributing data include: Arcadia, Azusa, Baldwin Park, Bell, Bell Gardens, Claremont, Culver City, Downey, Glendora, Long Beach, Monrovia, Palos Verdes, Pomona, Santa Monica, Sierra Madre, South Pasadena, and West Covina.

Access to LA County’s RTIIS will be restricted based on individual user security clearance levels, and the sensitivity of the data itself based on strict policy protocols spelled out in a memorandum of understanding between participating agencies. COPLINK also creates a detailed audit trail for every search conducted. This serves two purposes. Officers seeking to question or obtain a warrant on suspects identified through COPLINK are able to clearly demonstrate with hard facts how that person fits the criminal profile and how others were excluded. The Systems Administrator is also able to monitor use for audit purposes to identify any abuse that would result in suspension of a user's access privileges under the privacy and use protocols established by RTIIS participants in accordance with local, state and federal laws.

COPLINK is currently deployed in major strategic deployments across California including: the
Los Angeles Police Department; Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department: across Orange County through the Orange County Integrated Law and Justice (OCILJ) consortium of county police agencies, and across San Diego through the Automated Regional Justice Information System (ARJIS) Network which supports federal, state and local law enforcement agencies across San Diego. Each COPLINK “node” within California is or will be linked to provide for cross jurisdictional information sharing and collaboration to solve crimes.

When COPLINK is used to create regional or statewide networks, each participating agency has real-time control over what data is shared, with whom and when. In addition, data continues to reside and be updated at its existing source, with automatic refresh mechanisms triggering updates within COPLINK. These safeguards help protect the integrity of the data and sensitive information while allowing for the creation of ad hoc regional task forces to address specific
criminal activity.

COPLINK first catapulted into the national spotlight for its proof of concept role following the Montgomery County, Maryland sniper investigation. Today, the solution is in use in over 600 jurisdictions nationwide spanning across 20 states, including four of the nation’s five largest cities, helping police officers fight crime, thwart terrorism and improve community safety. A powerful force multiplier, COPLINK is documented as conservatively providing a 14:1 investigative time advantage, reducing the time it takes to identify qualified suspects, thereby enabling
law enforcement to keep more feet on the streets.

Winner of numerous awards, COPLINK was recognized twice by the
International Association of Chiefs of Police for deployments in Tucson, Arizona and across the State of Alaska. The Center for Digital Government also recognized COPLINK as one of the best-of-breed and most innovative IT projects undertaken by cities in the nation.

About Knowledge Computing Corporation
Knowledge Computing Corp. provides
technology-based crime-fighting solutions to leading edge law enforcement agencies nationwide. Its critically-acclaimed COPLINK®, solution, in use since 1998, is based on knowledge management technology first prototyped by top-ranked researchers in the Artificial Intelligence Lab at the University of Arizona in Tucson through a grant by the National Institute of Justice. The technologies developed at Knowledge Computing Corporation have been tested and proven by law enforcement agencies around the country. For more information: www.knowledgecc.com or www.coplink.com.

Saturday, October 13, 2007

Management, Investigations and the Inner Mind

October 13, 2007 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists over 760 state and local police officers who have written books. The website added cops who have written on management, investigations and the inner mind.

Charles Lushbaugh was a lieutenant with the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department (California). He is the co-author of Criminal Investigations: Basic Perspectives. According to the book description, Criminal Investigations: Basic Perspectives is “designed to help readers discover both the art and science of criminal investigation, this book explores the legal significance of evidence in the field, outlines the fundamentals of inquiry, and then carefully details each element of investigation—from the preliminaries to case preparation for prosecutor review. Reflecting the most recent changes in techniques and their application to various crimes, it features real-life case studies that give readers practice in developing their abilities to analyze, evaluate, and reason. Subjects covered are: Ethical Awareness; The Crime Scene; Witnesses and Evidence; Recording the Crime Scene; Basic Investigative Leads and Informants; Major Investigative Techniques; Laboratory and Technical Services; Interrogation of Suspects; Arresting the Accused Person; Physical Assaults; Sexual Assaults; Robbery; Arson; Bombing and Hate Crimes; Property Crimes; Dangerous Drugs; Vice/Gambling; and Organized Crimes.”

Fred R. Ferguson became the chief of police for the Salinas Police Department in the summer of 1977. He is the co-author of The Managing of Police Operations. According to the book description, “The Managing of Police Organizations, now in its fifth edition, is still THE essential text for any course in police organization and management, as well as for officers studying for promotional exams. While most texts in this area focus only on the basics on how to pass a promotional exam, this text takes a stronger and more prescriptive approach that teaches the reader exactly what he or she can do to create a stronger and more effective agency.

With a complete look at how to manage a police organization, including
leadership strategies, stress management, and police community relations, The Managing of Police Organizations is the only choice for a complete understanding of police management.”

A.L. Ward is a highly acclaimed experienced Hypnotist, Healer and Instructor with a 51-year track record. His contribution to a massive research project proved that hypnosis corrected 'non-medically responsive' health problems and that a universally consistent pattern of negative emotions caused the physical deficiencies. He was educated in schools in California, and served with the Navy on the aircraft carrier Intrepid from 1943-1945. On returning home he obtained a commercial pilots license with a flight instructors rating. He joined the San Bernardino Police Department in 1955 and retired in 1980. Following retirement he earned a lifetime California Community College teaching credential in police science.

He is the author of two books: The Inner Mind Revisited and Heaven: The Road Back Home. According to The Inner Mind Revisited, it “is a unique book whose direct approach brings thought provoking testimony to the growing evidence that the mind of man is capable of penetrating into the world beyond. It is a significant contribution to the better understanding of hypnosis and the Soul of man. The author prods the mind of the reader into a new spiritual awareness and the certainty that a pattern and purpose in life lies within the inner mind of every individual. The book also lists over forty different medical problems, some determined incurable by the medical profession, which were resolved in his one-hour hypnotic process.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 771 police officers (representing 350 police departments) and their 1654
law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Friday, October 12, 2007

A Cop’s Life

A man once asked me, besides the tickets and the donuts,
What’s it like being a cop?

READ ON
http://www.police-writers.com/hawkes_cops_life.html

COPLINK® Expands Across Arizona Helping Law Enforcement Thwart Criminal and Gang Activity Across Multiple Jurisdictions

COPLINK® Expands Across Arizona Helping Law Enforcement Thwart Criminal and Gang Activity Across Multiple Jurisdictions

IACP, New Orleans, LA and Tucson, AZ --- October 12, 2007 --- Knowledge Computing Corp. today announced that its award-winning COPLINK® solution suite will be deployed to support the East Valley
Gang and Crime Information Fusion Center in Mesa, Arizona. This follows successful deployments in Tucson, Pima County, Phoenix and Maricopa County that support law enforcement agencies in those and other neighboring jurisdictions as well as cross-jurisdictional crime solving initiatives. The announcement was made today in conjunction with the 114th Annual International Association of Police Chiefs (IACP) conference in New Orleans, Louisiana.

"COPLINK’s first commercial deployment in the
Tucson Police Department five years ago, and the successes they’ve achieved in solving crime and thwarting gang activity, have inspired over 600 jurisdictions nationwide across 20 states to adopt COPLINK,” said Robert Griffin, CEO of Knowledge Computing Corp. “We are pleased to support the efforts of the East Valley Gang and Crime Information Fusion Center to combat crime and gang activity across their jurisdictions and to have another major deployment in our home state.”

Gangs and criminals are more mobile today than ever, making it far more difficult to detect the scope of their operations and apprehend them,” said Mesa Police Chief George Gasc√≥n.” COPLINK turns the tables by giving law enforcement the advantage, identifying relationships, associations and patterns that will help us reduce criminal and gang activity across the East Valley by getting offenders off the street faster.”

“In Tucson, COPLINK has been an essential tool in our arsenal from the detective’s desk - to the patrol car - to officer’s on the beat who use hand-held devices - rapidly identifying suspects from petty to violent crimes,” said
Tucson Police Department’s ISD Administrator James Wysocki. “A study conducted by the Tucson Police Department shows that COPLINK annually creates a return on investment that vastly exceeds the investment we made in the program.”

COPLINK provides unparalleled analysis and decision support for rapidly identifying criminal suspects, relationships and patterns that help solve crime and thwart
terrorism. Using a GJXDM compliant interface, it works by allowing vast quantities of structured and seemingly unrelated data - including data currently housed in various incompatible databases and records management systems - to be securely organized, consolidated and rapidly analyzed over a highly secure intranet-based platform.

One search using known or partial facts from an ongoing investigation can produce qualified leads that would otherwise be unapparent in seconds - a process that prior to COPLINK was not possible or often takes days or weeks to accomplish. Through sophisticated analytics, including powerful visualization tools, COPLINK builds "institutional memory," reduces knowledge gaps and prevents criminals from falling through the cracks.
COPLINK currently supports 19
law enforcement agencies across Arizona that participate through deployments in Tucson, Pima County, Phoenix and Maricopa County. With the addition of the East Valley Gang and Crime Information Fusion Center, COPLINK will also provide support to jurisdictions across the East Valley region to thwart crime and gang activity.

Currently, the Tucson and Phoenix Police Departments are also able to share information through their COPLINK deployments. In addition, Tucson has interagency agreements with San Diego, California’s Automated Regional Justice Information System (ARJIS) and the Orange County, California Integrated Law and Justice Consortium (OCILJ) that allow participating agencies to share information across their COPLINK deployments. These interagency networks make it far more difficult for criminals and gangs to operate across multiple jurisdictions undetected and have enabled participating agencies to increase their effectiveness in getting violent and repeat offenders off the street.

When COPLINK is used to create regional or statewide networks, each participating agency has real-time control over what data is shared, with whom and when. In addition, data continues to reside and be updated at its existing source, with automatic refresh mechanisms triggering updates within COPLINK. These safeguards help protect the integrity of the data and sensitive information while allowing for the creation of ad hoc regional task forces to address specific criminal activity.

COPLINK first catapulted into the national spotlight for its proof of concept role following the Montgomery County, Maryland sniper investigation. Today, the solution is in use in over 600 jurisdictions nationwide spanning across 20 states, including four of the nation’s five largest cities, helping
police officers fight crime, thwart terrorism and improve community safety. A powerful force multiplier, COPLINK is documented as conservatively providing a 14:1 investigative time advantage, reducing the time it takes to identify qualified suspects, thereby enabling law enforcement to keep more feet on the streets.

Winner of numerous awards, COPLINK was recognized twice by the
International Association of Chiefs of Police for deployments in Tucson, Arizona and across the State of Alaska. The Center for Digital Government also recognized COPLINK as one of the best-of-breed and most innovative IT projects undertaken by cities in the nation.

About Knowledge Computing Corporation
Knowledge Computing Corp. provides technology-based crime-fighting solutions to leading edge law enforcement agencies nationwide. Its critically-acclaimed product, COPLINK®, in use since 1998, is based on knowledge management technology first prototyped by top-ranked researchers in the Artificial Intelligence Lab at the University of Arizona in Tucson through a grant by the National Institute of Justice. The technologies developed at Knowledge Computing Corporation have been tested and proven by
law enforcement agencies around the country. For more information: www.knowledgecc.com or www.coplink.com.

Tuesday, October 09, 2007

HERO'S NEVER DIE

Written by: Thomas A. Tully (Reserve Captain, Westwego Police Department)

A time will come when you're called away
To serve your Country day by day.
You joined the Marines the Proud the Brave
To fight for this Country known as the USA.

READ ON
http://www.police-writers.com/heros_never_die.html

Monday, October 01, 2007

Sheriff Deputy Books

October 1, 2007 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists over 750 state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three Sheriff Deputies from Los Angeles County.

Charles A. Sennewald, CMC, CPP, CSC is an independent security management consultant. He has been the Director of Security for Broadway Department Store, Chief of Security for the Claremont Colleges and a deputy sheriff with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. Additionally, Charles Sennewald is the founder and first president of the International Association of Professional Security Consultants (IAPSC), a graduate of the California State University at Los Angeles and the U.S. Army's Military Police School. Charles Sennewald is the author of six books: Effective Security Management; The Process of Investigation; Security Consulting; Shoplifters vs. Retailers: The Rights of Both; Shoplifting: Managing the Problem; and, The Last Volkswagen.

According to the book description of The Process of Investigation, it “is a book written to address the needs of the private investigator in the security field. Continuing in the tradition of its previous editions, this book covers essential topics which are often overlooked in works that concentrate on the public aspects of investigation. Investigative skills such as surveillance techniques, interviewing and interrogation, evidence, and confessions and written statements are all discussed, and supplemented with updated case studies and examples from the authors own experiences.”

James D. Whaley began his law enforcement career in 1967 as a deputy sheriff when he joined the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. In 1975, a little over a year after his graduation from law school, he joined the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In 1980, he was promoted to Supervisory Special Agent. James Whaley retired from the FBI in 1999. He continues to be active in law enforcement as a special consultant to the California Department of Corrections, Deadly Force Review Board and as an attorney in private practice. He is the co-author The Field Guide to Law Enforcement.

According to the description of The Field Guide to
Law Enforcement, “it provides clear, concise, and up-to-date statements of the rules of law applicable to situations commonly encountered by police officers in the field. Rules are stated from the point of view of an officer on duty. Officers who familiarize themselves with the layout and contents of the Field Guide should have no difficulty understanding the rules and applying them to "street" situations. The Field Guide has been designed for easy reference.”

In 1970,
Richard Valdemar began his law enforcement career as a military policeman in the United States Army; which included a tour in Vietnam. After his discharge he joined the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. He retired at the rank of sergeant in 2004. During the last 20 years on the job, “he was assigned to Major Crimes Bureau. He was also cross-designated as an FBI agent for 10 years of his career when he served on the Federal Metropolitan Gang Task Force. From 1995 until his retirement in 2004, Richard Valdemar was a member of the California Prison Gang Task Force, helping prosecute members of the Mexican Mafia.” He is the author of Siege at Waco.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 762 police officers (representing 347 police departments) and their 1643
law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.