Criminal Justice News

Saturday, January 26, 2008

Undercover Angel

January 25, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) The January 16, 2008 program of Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole features an interview with former police officer Lisa Lockwood – the author of Undercover Angel.

Program Date: January 30, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Undercover Angel
Guest:
Lisa Lockwood
Listen Live: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

About the Guest

Lisa Lockwood is a former Chicago area police officer. During her law enforcement career she worked as a police officer, undercover detective and SWAT team member. Lisa Lockwood is the author of Undercover Angel.

According to the book description, “
Lisa Lockwood endured childhood poverty and an abusive marriage to become a soldier in Desert Storm, a police officer, undercover narcotics detective and the first female SWAT team member. A former beauty pageant contestant, Lisa had to suppress her obvious femininity in order to conquer the "Boys Club" of law enforcement, but her beguiling beauty would become her best asset as an undercover narcotics detective. It was in the gritty world of drug rings, Mafia members and child molesters that she rediscovered the power of her femininity and learned to use her disarming sexuality as a professional asset in ensnaring criminals.

Lisa's journey was fraught with inner conflict as she struggled to balance her dangerous profession with a desire to be a complete woman, worthy of genuine love. Undercover Angel is
Lisa Lockwood’s illuminating story of perseverance and unstoppable drive, that took her deep into the heart of a violent world and left her in a place of happiness, self-confidence and inner peace.”

About the
Watering Hole

The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting. During the first half-hour of the show, the host, a nationally recognized expert on law enforcement, interviews a subject matter expert on the topic. During the second half-hour the program is joined by two other cops who give a street-level perspective to the conversation.

About the Host

Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Friday, January 25, 2008

Diamonds, fiction and promotions

January 25, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three police officers: Kelly Ross; Bill DiMonda; and, Mark Adamson.

Constable
Kelly Ross is a 19 year member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police who specializes in investigating the criminal use of diamonds and jewelry; and he coordinates the Diamond Program, Customs and Excise Unit, Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Kelly Ross is also a jeweler and gemologist and has testified in court as an expert on the criminal use of diamonds, gemstones and jewelry. Kelly Ross is the author of The Fifth "C": The Criminal Use of Diamonds.

According to the book description of The Fifth "C": The
Criminal Use of Diamonds, “it exposes why criminals are so drawn to diamonds, how diamonds are used in criminal activity, and why it is difficult to stop this criminal activity. The foundations that diamond values are based on are the Carat, Colour, Clarity and Cut of a diamond. The value of diamonds is also being re-defined by criminals who have sought out diamonds and like commodities in North America for decades. For criminals, diamonds are seen as instruments to facilitate criminal activity and in this age of money tracking and anti-money laundering legislation, they are also used as a hedge against inflation and the authorities. In the world of criminals who profit from diamonds, the Fifth C is Crime.”

Bill DiMonda is a former member of the Nassau County Police Department (New York) and a retired member of the King County Police Department (Washington). As an officer in the Nassau County Police Department he walked a foot beat and drove a district patrol car in the Seventh Precinct. As a member of the King County Police he worked as a Patrolman, a Plainclothes Investigator in the Pro Active Unit and a Detective in Homicide and Robbery. Bill DiMonda is the author of Street Crazy.

According to the description of Street Crazy, “At thirty-eight, Johnny Hardy is not your run-of-the-mill, two-bit punk down on his luck. He is one of the “new breed” of criminals who relentlessly prowl our urban streets in constant search of a helpless victim, a survivor, driven solely by his desire to be free. Word on the street where Johnny made his living is that he’s crazy. Not crazy in the way you and I, or even Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, define it. It is more appropriate to label Hardy as “street crazy.” For this reason he has become one of the most respected and feared figures in the criminal element of the Northwest.”

Captain
Mark Adamson (ret.) retired after a lengthy career with the Bayonne Police Department. Mark Adamson is the author of four books: The Secrets You Must Know to SCORE HIGH on Your Next Promotional Exam; Attorney General Guidelines Quizzer; The Law Enforcement Manual; and, The New Jersey 2C Quizzer.

According to the book description of The Secrets You Must Know to SCORE HIGH on Your Next Promotional Exam, “Have you ever wondered why certain individuals consistently do well on promotional examinations while others always seem to miss the mark? I am sure you have heard all the excuses. They are just smart, they had "inside information," they have more education, they have a "hook" or they are just natural born test takers. The truth is there is no such thing as a natural born test taker. Candidates who have a history of scoring high on promotional exams have learned the secrets of preparation and test taking. By reading this book, you too will learn the secrets you must know to score high on your next promotional exam.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 835
police officers (representing 380 police departments) and their 1765 law enforcement books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Thursday, January 24, 2008

New Thriller by Real Life Cop James O. Born

January 24, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) James O. Born’s new book, Burn Zone, is to be released in mid-February. James O. Born is a Special Agent with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. He has been involved in investigations in such areas as organized crime, violent crimes, economic crimes, drug cartels, and police corruption.

Before working with the
Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Born joined the U.S. Marshals service in early 1986 as a deputy marshal. One year later, he transferred to the Drug Enforcement Administration. In four years with DEA, he was assigned to the West Palm Beach field office, and traveled within the United States and Panama. He spent a great deal of time in Miami during the height of the drug wars. His investigations at DEA generally focused on cocaine smuggling from Colombia. In addition, he worked undercover in a number of situations, in one case volunteering to assist the ATF as an undercover agent in the Ku Klux Klan during an explosives investigation.

According to the description of Burn Zone, “It was supposed to be a low-level bust for ATF agent Alex Duarte, with the hope that he could work it up the ladder to someone important. He just didn’t know how important. In New Orleans to check out a mysterious Panamanian named Ortiz who likes to trade guns illegally and import marijuana by the truckload, Duarte suddenly finds himself in the middle of something bigger than he has ever known. Because guns and drugs are bad enough – but there are other things that are much, much worse. A shadowy colonel who is not what he seems…a white supremacist intent on becoming “the man who changed America”…an attractive FBI agent with a lot of pull and a lot of secrets…Duarte knows he’s in deep with these characters. He just hopes it’s not over his head.”

James O. Born’s previous novels have earned considerable praise:

“Field of Fire jumps Born into the ranks of the major thriller writers,” says W.E.B. Griffin.

"Field Of Fire is a whiz-bang, nonstop thriller, told with the voice of absolute authority. Jim Born never lets the action flag!" Tess Gerritsen.

“Field of Fire is impossible to put down.” Mystery Scene Magazine.

"Jim Born raises the bar for the police procedural thriller."--Joseph Wambaugh.

“Jim Born is the real thing: a South Florida lawman with an authentic sound that puts you at the scene. Walking Money is a winner.” -Elmore Leonard

“Top thrill-work . . .”- Kirkus Review, 3/05

“Putting 17 years of service with various law enforcement agencies to excellent use, Born delivers a riveting, serpentine tale. . . . This is a terrific debut” - Publisher’s Weekly

James has taken his new book on tour and will be available to sign copies at:

2/15–Murder on the Beach, Delray Beach 7 PM
2/16 – Circle Books, Sarasota, 1 PM
2/16 – Haslam’s Books, St Petersburg 4:30 PM
2/17 – Barnes &Nobles, Ft. Myers 1 PM
2/17 – Borders, Naples 4 PM
2/19 – Books & Books, Coral Gables 8 PM
2/20 – Borders, Boca Raton 7 PM
2/22 – South Carolina Book Festival 3 days
2/25 – Coffee Buy the Book, Roswell, GA 7:00
2/26 – Bayou Books/ Library, Niceville, FL 6:00
2/27 – Citrus County Library, Beverly Hills, FL
2/27 – The Muse, Deland, 6 PM
3/1 – Sleuthfest, Ft Lauderdale TBA
3/5 – Vero Beach Book Center, Vero Beach 7
3/8 – Low Country Writers, Charleston S.C.
3/8 – Barnes & Nobles, Charleston, SC 7PM
3/12 – SW Florida Museum fundraiser Evening
3/14 – SW Florida Book Festival TBA
3/18 –Barnes & Noble, Wellington 7PM
3/19 – Barnes & Noble, Plantation 7 PM
3/22 – Hooked on Books, Islamorada 3 PM
3/26 – Poisoned Pen, Scottsdale, AZ 7 PM
3/27 – Murder By The Book, Houston, TX
3/28 – Virginia Festival of Books, 4 PM
4/4 – Vero Beach Literacy Foundation
4/5 – Naples Press Club conference
4/22 – Florida Library Association

Contact information for the speaking tour:
www.jamesborn.com
speakingjamesborn@comcast.net
Agent: Meg Ruley (212) 593-4330 mruley@janerotrosen.com
Publicist: Yamil Anglada (212) 366-2574, G.P. Putnam’s Sons Yamil.Anglada@us.penguingroup.com

Police-Writers.com now hosts 833
police officers (representing 379 police departments) and their 1759 law enforcement books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Police Officer Takes Writing Career Full-time

January 23, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Best selling author and award-winning Police Officer Shane Moore announced his retirement from law enforcement and to pursue his writing career full-time.

Shane Moore grew up poor in rural Illinois. In his youth, he wore Salvation Army clothes and never owned more than two pairs of pants for school. Before began preschool, Shane tested off the charts and was moved to kindergarten at age three. Shane was sixteen when he entered his senior year of High School. After High School, Shane Moore enlisted in the United States Navy.

During his
military service, Shane Moore served in campaigns Provide Hope and Secure Democracy, during the Bosnian civil conflict. After his discharge from the Navy, Shane Moore attended classes to become a police officer. At the time of his retirement he was a detective for the Gillespie Police Department (Illinois).

During his law enforcement career
Shane Moore received: Over 30 letters of commendation from various supervisors, departments, and State's Attorneys; Two citations for bravery; One citation for life saving; One medal for life saving; and, Officer of the year in 2005.

In January 2007 Shane's first fantasy novel titled; "A Prisoner's Welcome" was released. Since then he has been taken on a whirlwind ride across the country signing books in Canada and many states, quickly becoming one of his publisher's best selling books of 2007.
Shane Moore has gathered praise from many other authors of his genre, including Robert Fanney, John Beachem, and Joe Lawson. In addition, several professional artists liked his work so much they voluntarily have began series of artwork depicting characters from his debut novel. Of these artist, the most notable is; "Billy Tackett." Shane has recently met with several companies to produce products from his book.

Shane Moore has recently finished his second book; "The Breach of Crowns" and is working in his third; "Exodus of the Strong." He lives with his wife Alicia Moore, and his son, Dakota Moore.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 833
police officers (representing 379 police departments) and their 1759 law enforcement books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Monday, January 21, 2008

CBR Weapons and WMD Terrorism News- January 21, 2008

BWC [Biological Weapons Convention] States Tackle National Implementation
“A Dec. 10-14 meeting of member states of the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) offered rhetorical support for stepping up national implementation measures to bring domestic laws, administrative procedures, and regulations into conformity with the bioweapons ban. But the meeting also showcased transatlantic differences that have stymied attempts for more binding measures since the beginning of the Bush administration. Following up on a meeting of experts last August, the final report from the meeting of states-parties agreed on the ‘fundamental importance’ of national measures to implement the BWC. Such measures include controls on transfers of biological agents, biosafety and biosecurity regulations, and penal legislation. However, the meeting did not agree on any joint standards or collective measures. The meeting’s chair, Pakistani Ambassador Masood Khan, pointed out in his opening statement that the task of the meeting was to ‘promote common understanding and effective action,’
not to negotiate binding agreements.” (Arms Control Today, January/February 2008, Oliver Meier) http://www.armscontrol.org/act/2008_01-02/bwc.asp

India claims to have destroyed 93 % of its chemical weapons
India has claimed to destroy its 93 per cent of chemical weapon stockpile and the remaining weapons will be eliminated by April, 2009. Media reports quoting official sources here [in New Dehli] said India had assured the international community [that it will] complete the process of total destruction of chemical weapons by April next year.” (Associated Press of Pakistan, 20Jan08)
http://www.app.com.pk/en/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=26753&Itemid=2

Deadly chemicals hidden in war cache
“For more than 60 years RAAF [Royal Australian
Air Force] veterans Geoff Burn and Arthur Lewis kept silent about the terrible secret hidden in a disused railway tunnel at the foot of the Blue Mountains. Thousands of barrels filled with chemical weapons, including mustard gas, were stored in the tunnel at Glenbrook and other sites around Australia during the Second World War. The men were part of a secret unit formed to look after the deadly stockpile, kept for use against Japanese troops - a fact the Defence Department refused to admit until the late 1980s. And for decades successive governments refused to disclose that the Australian wartime command had conducted chemical warfare experiments on its own soldiers. […] Now, after decades of denials, the military is about to recognise the unit's contribution to the war effort. Next month the Defence Department will publish a book - Chemical Warfare In Australia - detailing the unit's story, including how they and army volunteers were used as guinea pigs by their own commanders.” (Sydney Morning Herald, 20Jan08, Frank Walker) http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/deadly-chemicals-hidden-in-war-cache/2008/01/19/1200620272396.html

Guinea pig’ sailor set for pay-out after 50 years
“A former sailor from York [England] who claims he was used as a guinea pig in chemical warfare experiments finally looks set to receive compensation - half a century later. Sam Smith says he has suffered from chest problems and watering eyes ever since he took part in research in the 1950s at the Ministry of Defence's chemical research centre at Porton Down, Wiltshire, after being led to believe he was helping to find a cure for the common cold.” (York Press, 21Jan08, Richard harris) http://www.thisisyork.co.uk/display.var.1980827.0.guinea_pig_sailor_set_for_payout_after_50_years.php

Porton Down veteran awaits compensation
“A war veteran who says he was duped into having chemical weapons tested on him is waiting with bated breath to see if he has been granted a slice of £3 million compensation. When former Royal Marine Jim Booth (63) agreed to take part in a two-week medical trial at Porton Down research centre in Wiltshire in the ’60s, he thought he would be trialling medication to treat the common cold. Instead, the Market Deeping man claims, he was subjected to mustard gas and was injected with unknown drugs before being made to take part in tests to assess his reactions.” (Peterborough Evening Telegraph, 18Jan08, Kirsty Nicolson) http://www.peterboroughtoday.co.uk/news/Porton-Down-veteran-awaits-compensation.3686704.jp

Plan for chemical
security is delayed
Homeland Security officials have delayed a requirement that farmers register with the agency if they have certain amounts of certain chemicals. Farmers and ranchers had been facing a Tuesday deadline to come up with a security plan and register it. ‘Most producers knew nothing about either the requirements or the deadline; most state agriculture departments had not been told of them,’ said North Dakota Agriculture Commissioner Roger Johnson, who is president of the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture. Homeland Security, in announcing the delay, said the agency is gathering more information on the issue to see if changes to the requirements are warranted, especially in light of a new law that gives the agency authority to regulate the sale and transfer of ammonium nitrate fertilizer. Johnson said anhydrous ammonia, another popular farm fertilizer in North Dakota, also is included in Homeland Security's list of chemicals. The association Johnson heads brought its worries to Homeland Security, and ‘It appears the problem is at least temporarily resolved,’ he said.” (The Bismark Tribune, 21Jan08, AP) http://www.bismarcktribune.com/articles/2008/01/21/news/local/147054.txt

N.J. [
New Jersey] security chief says state needs boost in federal funding
“New Jersey's mass transit system remains a potential target for a
terrorist attack and needs additional federal funding to ensure safe passage for thousands of daily commuters, the state's top security official said yesterday. ‘Anything that happens here has implications for New York City,’ said Richard Cañas, director of the state Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness. ‘Yet every year we feel like deadbeats asking for federal handouts to protect ourselves against what we all agree is a national threat.’ Cañas' remarks came during a visit from U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security, which controls how funds are distributed to states. Thompson visited the State Police Regional Operations Intelligence Center in West Trenton before taking a helicopter tour of potential terror targets in North Jersey. Those sites included Newark Liberty International Airport, the Lincoln Tunnel, the chemical facilities and oil refineries along the New Jersey Turnpike and Port Newark.” (The Star-Ledger, 20Jan08, John Holl)
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-9/1200807357158880.xml&coll=1

Students learn to be prepared for crises
“About 20 sophomores donned protective mesh vests, each with a piece of paper attached containing the title of an emergency worker. They gathered around a 20-by-6-foot table with a miniature city displayed on it and played roles. Their job was to evaluate a stream that reportedly had a contaminant in it. […] The students were answering […] questions during a
homeland security and emergency preparedness class being piloted at Joppatowne High School [in Maryland] this school year. […] The students take the second part of the program during their junior year, when they select a specialty area of study from one of three topics: homeland security sciences, law enforcement and criminal justice, and information and communications technology. Depending on which area the students select, they study such topics as chemical and biological warfare, research methods, the justice system, law processes, first responders to emergency scenes, and evidence collection and analysis, and even learn how to use a geographic information system.” (Baltimore Sun, 20Jan08, Cassandra A. Fortin) http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/harford/bal-ha.homeland20jan20,0,703936.story

CNS ChemBio-WMD
Terrorism News is prepared by the Chemical and Biological Weapons Nonproliferation Program of the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies in order to bring timely and focused information to researchers and policymakers interested in the fields of chemical, biological, and radiological weapons nonproliferation and WMD terrorism.

CNS presents these keywords and links for the convenience of the recipients of ChemBio-WMD
Terrorism News, but CNS does not endorse these sites or the veracity of their information and cannot be responsible for the maintenance of the links listed here. For a searchable archive of the CBR-WMD Terrorism News listserv, please visit the Nuclear Threat Initiative's website, at http://www.nti.org/db/cbw/index.htm

Thursday, January 17, 2008

Sexual Victimization in Prisons: Moving Toward Elimination

February 7, 2008: 2pm–4pm EST
Free online event. Registration required.

According to a report released in December of 2007 by the Bureau of
Justice Statistics, an estimated 60,500 state and federal prisoners reported one or more incidents of sexual victimization within the year. Nationwide, 2.1 percent of inmates reported an incident involving another inmate, and 2.9 percent reported an incident involving facility staff members.

The results come from research mandated by the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA), which establishes a zero-tolerance standard for the incidence of rape in U.S. prisons.

Previously only a few, small research studies investigated
sexual assault in correctional institutions. Further, as the rate of women's imprisonment has increased over the past 20 years, so has the interest in women's prison research — the studies conducted highlight a culture of sex and adverse effects of victimization that are unique to female correctional settings, and must be considered.

This expert chat, sponsored by the Harvard Kennedy School's Government Innovators Network and the National Institute of
Justice, features a panel of experts who will discuss the state of PREA research — what data is available and what's yet to come — and examine how we will move from better understanding to reliable prevention and eventual elimination. Ample time will be allocated for audience Q&A.

View a detailed description of the event and register today.

Wednesday, January 16, 2008

International and Domestic Cop Books Added

January 15, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added one international police author and two domestic police authors.

Gerry Mackey is a retired police officer from the Miami Beach Police Department. Gerry Mackey is the author of A Necessary End.

According to the book description of A Necessary End, “When 23 year old Katie Maguire graduated from the Miami police academy, she was ready to begin her new career with the South Beach Police Department. That's when Sergeant Steve Callaghan approached her for a special undercover assignment - as an underage prostitute. An easy detail, with very little danger. That is, until Murphy's Law took over.”

Greg Miraglia is the Dean of the Criminal Justice Training Center and Police Academy at Napa Valley College in California. He oversees one of 39 state certified law enforcement training centers in the state. Greg Miraglia began his career as a police explorer scout at the age of 15 and has since served three law enforcement agencies in positions including 9-1-1 dispatcher, reserve police officer, supervisor, division manager, and most recently as a deputy chief with the Napa Valley Railroad Police Department.

Greg Miraglia is active as a member of the Matthew Shepard Foundation Advisory Board, a faculty member of the “Stop The Hate!” program, and as a mentor for Positive Images of Santa Rosa, California. Greg Miraglia has a Masters Degree in Education Administration, a Bachelor’s Degree in Business, and is a graduate of the California P.O.S.T. Master Instructor Development Program. Greg Miraglia is the author of Coming Out From Behind The Badge: Stories Of Success And Advice From Police Officers "Out" On The Job.

According to the book description, Coming Out From Behind The Badge: Stories Of Success And Advice From Police Officers "Out" On The Job is “about how police officers can overcome law enforcement's unwritten "don't ask, don't tell" policy and live their lives as they were made to be. The book includes a collection of autobiographies of highly successful police officers from all over the country. These rarely published coming out stories of real police officers are intended to inspire the thousands of law enforcement officers who are still in the closet and who are searching for the courage to come out.”

Kuldip Sharma, joined Indian Police Service in 1976 and was allotted the Gujarat cadre. He has served as Superintendent of Police in four different districts of Gujarat including the border district of Kachchh. He has had a first hand experience of metropolitan policing during his assignment as Commissioner of Police at Rajkot, Vadodara and Surat. During the high noon of militant activity in the country, he was chosen to head the Anti-Terrorist Squad at a time when Gujarat was categorized as one of the six most hypersensitive states. Sharma Kuldip is Bachelor of Science and Laws and a PhD in Public Administration and the author of Heaven’s Light Our Guide- The Genesis of Indian Police.

According to the book description of Heaven's Light Our Guide- The Genesis of
Indian Police, “The police system in India springs from the Police Act of 1861. This was a statute created by the British in the immediate aftermath of the uprising of 1857. The field of executive police functions is enormous and covers all branches of civil administration. It has to protect human life, property, honor, religion and everything that man has created out of his constructive genius. It has to restrain every thing that degrades or destroys or arrests its progress. And it has to unite and streamline various forces to form into a smooth stream leading to the final realization of happiness and prosperity.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 830
police officers (representing 377 police departments) and their 1752 law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Tuesday, January 15, 2008

Defining Terrorism: A Difference of Opinion

In order to successfully combat terrorism around the world, there must be a universal method of identifying potential terrorists or terrorist organizations. In order to accomplish this task, nations must come to an agreement on an objective definition of the word terrorism. Unfortunately, many nations around the world define terrorism differently. The lack of a common definition of terrorism may allow one nation to identify an organization as terrorist group, while another nation identifies the same organization as a legitimate group. This is often referred to as, "one man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter."

READ ON
http://www.police-writers.com/defining_terrorism_difference_opinion.html

Chasing Speed

In the Spring of 1999, couple of my Task Force officers, along with myself, were sitting in our office writing reports and discussing several cases that we had just made. Suddenly our supervisor walked in and said "Boys I think we have a meth lab around here somewhere". Wow, did we give him the once over. We called him everything but a crazy man. We were very familiar with methamphetamine but the concept of a meth lab went completely over our heads.

READ ON
http://www.police-writers.com/chasing_speed.html

Sunday, January 13, 2008

Behind the Badge in Atchafalaya Swamp

January 5, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) The January 16, 2008 program of Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole features an interview with a retired police officer Dee Dee Serpas, who is the author of Behind the Badge in the Atchafalaya Swamp.

Program Date: January 16, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Behind the Badge in Atchafalaya Swamp
Guest: Police Officer
Dee Dee Serpas (ret.)
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

About the Guest

Following in the footsteps of her great-grandfather, Sheriff Paul Berthelot, Sheriff of St. John the Baptist Parish, and that of her father, who was president of FOP Lodge 2 in the late 1950s,
Dee Dee Serpas became a Police Officer. First with the East Jefferson Levee Board Police, she also joined the Kenner Police Department and was the only female to graduate from the academy that year. Later, she joined the Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office as a street cop. This makes her the only known female in Louisiana to have held three commissions by the age of 21. Dee Dee Serpas is the author of Behind the Badge in Atchafalaya Swamp.

According to
Dee Dee Serpas, in Behind the Badge, “names, places and incidents have been changed to protect the innocent and the guilty.” The small Parish of Atchafalaya is nestled in the bayous and swamps of Louisiana. Here, Behind the Behind, five children are orphaned by Hurricane Dakota in 1962. It’s a story of twins that follow their family's footsteps into law enforcement; Childhood sweethearts that are partners on the force and fall in love; and, being torn apart by a line-of-duty death.

About the
Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting. During the first half-hour of the show, the host, a nationally recognized expert on law enforcement, interviews a subject matter expert on the topic. During the second half-hour the program is joined by two other cops who give a street-level perspective to the conversation.

About the Host
Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond is currently a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Thursday, January 10, 2008

Public Safety Technology in the News

Public Safety Technology News Recap (January 10, 2008)

Border Patrol Ready To Test 'Virtual Fence' Towers
Arizona Daily Star, (12/8/2007), Brady McCombs

Border Patrol agents in the Altar Valley southwest of
Tucson have been given "conditional possession" of the prototype system of camera towers that spans 28 miles of border territory. The system, which was turned over to the Border Patrol for a 45-day test, was designed by Boeing. Each tower is equipped with video surveillance and radar sensors, and the information gathered by the towers is sent to command centers and to agents' vehicles.
www.azstarnet.com/metro/215338

With New Device, Police Shake, Rattle, and Roll
Washington Post, (10/29/2007), Allison Klein

In order for
law enforcement to respond to emergencies quickly, agencies have traditionally relied on lights and sirens. With the added distractions of loud music and cell phones, police need a little something more to get drivers' attention. In 49 cruisers across Washington, D.C., police have added the Rumbler, developed by Federal Signal, to go along with traditional lights and sirens. When activated, the Rumbler emits a low frequency vibration that lasts about 10 seconds and can be felt by drivers up to 200 feet away, allowing officers to get through traffic safer and faster.
www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/10/28/AR2007102801465.html

PSU Considers High-Tech Van
Daily Collegian Online, (12/12/2007), Alex Weisler

A $1 million van, nicknamed the Network
Emergency Response Vehicle (NERV), will hopefully become part of Penn State's College of Information Sciences and Technology's program as their "extreme events laboratory." The van would serve as a learning tool for students in the program, and would provide them the chance to go through various security scenarios involving potential campus-related terrorist targets, such as the football stadium. NERV comes equipped with voice over Internet Protocol (IP), radio over IP, video over IP, a hi-definition video conferencing system, and a wireless mesh incident network. NERV has been used after such disasters as Hurricane Katrina and the San Diego wildfires.
www.psucollegian.com/archive/2007/12/12/psu_considers_hightech_van.aspx

Gordon's Meth Cleanup Bill Passes
Times-Gazette, (12/13/2007)

Legislation to assist localities with the clean up of former methamphetamine lab locations is closer to becoming law. The Methamphetamine Remediation Research Act (H.R. 365) will require the Environmental Protection Agency to develop a set of guidelines that can be used in an effort to reclaim meth lab locations and make them safe for habitation. This effort is needed because of the toxic nature of the chemicals used to create meth and their ability to permeate into walls and carpeting, which presents a health risk for those who later live in the dwelling. This bill also authorizes the National Institute of Standards and
Technology to conduct research into the development of meth detection equipment for use by officers and first responders to quickly detect active meth labs and determine contamination levels.
www.t-g.com/story/1297300.html

Sweden: Volvo Group Invests in Tiredness-Detection Technology
Automotive World, (12/19/2007), Glenn Brooks

Due to collision investigation research conducted by Volvo Group, Volvo
Technology Transfer has invested in Seeing Machines. Seeing Machines, from Australia, has created a system capable of detecting and alerting drivers to fatigue warning signs. The company has experience with technology capable of tracking and analyzing head movement, eye movement, and facial expression. The system is equipped with a video camera that is trained on the driver and records driver activity at the wheel. The recorded information is passed to an on-board data processing unit that recognizes the signs of distraction and fatigue and signals the driver.
www.automotiveworld.com/ACM/content.asp?contentid=65402

Technocops Learn How To Dig for Cell-Phone Clues
The Express Times, (12/14/2007), Tom Quigley

Warren County Community College in New Jersey conducted training on digital evidence collection from cell phones for investigators from State and local jurisdictions as well as private investigators. Students learned about concepts such as "nibble switches," codes, and the task of digging through a cell phone's memory to find things that criminals thought were deleted. The techniques taught are designed to ensure the admissibility of any evidence that is found.
www.nj.com/news/expresstimes/nj/index.ssf?/base/news-6/1197609719295300.xml&coll=2

Facial Recognition Security Launched in Metro Schools
NewsChannel5.com, (12/5/2007)

In an effort to make Metro Nashville Public Schools more secure and safe, the district has implemented facial recognition cameras in one metro school, with two additional schools and district administrative offices set up to become active in the coming weeks. Cross Match developed the system, which stores facial images in a database and alerts a staff member if a facial scan matches an individual on the school's watch list. The district plans to use mobile units at after-school events. If this initial phase produces positive results, the district plans to add additional camera units to more schools in the coming years.
www.newschannel5.com/Global/story.asp?s=7455047

Intensified Efforts To Combat Identity Theft
HSDailyWire.com, (12/19/2007)

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) provided the House Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Crime,
Terrorism, and Homeland Security with testimony that indicated identity theft as one of the commission's high priorities. FTC efforts in this area include consumer/business education, as well as being a key participant on the President's Identity Theft Task Force. Since 2001, the commission's law enforcement efforts include 14 cases against businesses that had not enacted measures necessary to protect consumer information. The commission, along with 16 agencies on the President's task force, has developed 31 initiatives, most of which have been or are in the process of being implemented. Also, the FTC informed the House Judiciary Committee that it received up to 20,000 calls weekly seeking assistance with guarding against or recovering from identity theft. In addition, the FTC is pursuing actions that involve the National Do Not Call Registry.
hsdailywire.com/single.php?id=5256

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Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center, supported by Cooperative Agreement 2005-MU-CX-K077 awarded by the U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice (NIJ). Regular postings to JUSTNETNews include abstracted news articles on law enforcement and corrections technology topics, upcoming NLECTC and NIJ events, NLECTC services and activities, new publications, and other technology-related announcements. Please note that providing information on law enforcement and corrections technology or the mention of specific manufacturers or products does not constitute the endorsement of the U.S. Department of Justice or its component parts.

Tuesday, January 08, 2008

Sneak Peak at Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style

January 8, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Dr. Andrew J. Harvey and Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA announced that portions of their book, Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style, were available for public review using the “Search Inside” function on Amazon.com. Go to www.pokerleadership.com and click on the image of the book and you will be taken directly to the Amazon.com page.

About the Book:
Using poker as analogy for
leadership, Captain Andrew J. Harvey, CPD (ret.), Ed.D. and Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA found the right mix of practical experience and academic credentials to write a definitive book for leaders. Working together, Harvey and Foster have written Leadership: Texas Hold em Style. Most often leaders find they are given a set of resources people, equipment, funds, experience and a mission. As Foster noted, You are dealt a certain hand. How you play that hand as a leader determines your success

More than a book: A fun and entertaining journey through
leadership that includes an interactive website to supplement knowledge gained from the book.
Proven and Tested: Not an academic approach to
leadership, but rather a road-tested guide that has been developed through 50-years of author experience.
High Impact: Through the use of perspective, reflection, and knowledge, provides information that turns
leadership potential into leadership practice.
Ease of Application: Theory is reinforced with real-life experience, which results in accessible and practical tools leaders can put to use immediately.
High Road Approach: Personal character and ethical beliefs are woven into each leadership approach, so leaders do the right thing for the right reasons.
Uses Game of Poker: Rather than a dry approach that is all fact and no flavor, the game of poker is used as a lens through which to view leadership concepts.

About the Authors:
Andrew J. Harvey served in law enforcement for 25 years, the last 12 as a captain with a Southern California police agency. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Cal State Los Angeles, and an educational doctorate in the field of organizational leadership from Pepperdine University. He is a graduate of the FBI National Academy, the California POST Command College, the West Point Leadership Program, and is recognized in California as a master instructor.

Dr.
Andrew J. Harvey is an experienced college educator, currently serving as a professor at the University of Phoenix, and as a faculty advisor at the Union Institute and University. He has been published numerous times in national and international publications. He is a recognized expert in leadership and career development, and has served as an instructor in command leadership at the Los Angeles Police Department Academy.

Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton. He has completed the course work for his doctorate in Business Research. Raymond is a graduate of the West Point Leadership program and has attended law enforcement, technology and leadership programs such as the National Institute for Justice, Technology Institute, Washington, DC.

Raymond E. Foster is currently a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond E. Foster is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

For more information about the authors, send and email to
editor@police-writers.com

Monday, January 07, 2008

1737 Law Enforcement Books

January 5, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. With the addition of three police officers, the website now lists 1737 books written by 823 police officers.

Dorothy Schulz is Professor of Law, Police Studies, and Criminal Justice Administration at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. She was the first woman captain to serve with the Metro-North Commuter Railroad Police Department and its predecessor department, the Conrail Police Department. Dorothy Schulz is a member of numerous police and academic associations, and has spoken at conferences of the International Association of Women Police, Women in Federal Law Enforcement, the National Center for Women & Policing, the Senior Women Officers of Great Britain, and the Canadian Police College. Dorothy Schulz is the author of From Social Worker to Crimefighter: Women in United States Municipal Policing and Breaking the Brass Ceiling: Women Police Chiefs and Their Paths to the Top.

According to a review of Breaking the Brass Ceiling:
Women Police Chiefs and Their Paths to the Top, in Law Enforcement News, “Schulz has written a readable, straightforward book about female police chief executives. The subject is the changing role of women in the traditionally male-dominated field of law enforcement, and the book includes numerous biographical sketches of women who have risen to the top in the challenging world of policing. Schulz notes that it is only in the last two decades that women have moved into the top ranks of police management, whether as municipal police chiefs, county sheriffs, or colonels in state police agencies. Currently about 1 percent (200 or so) of the chiefs and sheriffs are women--unique trailblazers who have managed to break the "brass ceiling." Schulz clearly predicts that other women will inevitably follow in their footsteps. This well-written, well-researched book should be read by anyone interested in the changing face of policing in the US.

Joseph Anthony Travers is a graduate of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Academy and a former Hawthorne Police Department (California) police officer. Joseph Travers is the author of Introduction to Private Investigation.

According to the description of Introduction to
Private Investigation it “is designed to provide the essential knowledge and procedures needed to operate successfully as a private investigator. It is both an instructional textbook for those individuals desiring a career as a private investigator, and a resource manual that can be an invaluable tool for later reference. The approach is a direct, concise style, which facilitates comprehension by novices as well as experienced private investigators, and makes possible competent and professional performance of all types of private investigation.”

Detective Sergeant
Peter Caram, (ret.) Port Authority Police Department of New York/New Jersey is the former commander and creator of the PAPD Counter-terrorism Unit. This unique unit was responsible for conducting vulnerability studies throughout the Port of NY/NJ district and was responsible for investigating terrorism and target hardening for the PAPD and its vast properties, bridges, tunnels, airports, buses, trains and related ports and transportation systems in the NY/NJ region. The unit collected terrorist information and conducted proactive counter-terrorist investigations in conjunction with the FBI’s Joint Terrorist Task Force and affiliated law enforcement agencies. Sgt. Peter Caram retired after 25 years of service that were primarily spent in the counter-terrorism intelligence field developing intelligence operations and training programs for the Port Authority Police Department.

Peter Caram is a member of the International Counter-Terrorist Officers Association and author of The 1993 World Trade Center Bombing: Foresight and Warning, There is No Failure in the World of Jihad, published just after the tragedy of 9/11. This work has become required reading in many criminal justice courses at universities and police academies. He has been a guest on many television and radio programs as an expert on fundamentalist-terrorism and has been consulted frequently by many governmental agencies including the US Department of State Middle Eastern Crisis Desk. Sergeant. Peter Caram currently teaches Criminal Justice related courses at Rutgers University in New Jersey.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 823
police officers (representing 370 police departments) and their 1737 law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Saturday, January 05, 2008

Advancement and Promotion in Law Enforcement

January 5, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) The January 9, 2008 program of Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole features a nationally recognized expert on promotion and advancement in law enforcement.

Program Date: January 9, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Promotion and Advancement in Law Enforcement
Guest: Lieutenant
Paul Patti (ret.)
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

About the Guest
Lieutenant
Paul Patti (ret.) has over 27 years of law enforcement experience in southeast Florida. His policing experience includes over sixteen years as a department commander; four years in charge of hiring and interviewing; and, more than seventeen years as a permanent member of the department's Oral Interview Panel where he was the "Hardass" member that interviewed OVER 500 applicants for law enforcement positions. Lieutenant Paul Patti’s training and education includes a BA in Criminal Justice and he is a graduate of the Southern Police Institute and many other certifications, and thousands of hours of law enforcement training.

Additionally, Lieutenant
Paul Patti’s police experience also includes Personnel Commander, Police Firearms and Academy Instructor, Training Supervisor, Patrol Commander, SWAT Commander, Criminal Investigations Commander, Acting Chief of Police, Acting Deputy Chief of Police, and many other department assignments.

Lieutenant
Paul Patti is a published author of fiction and non-fiction books, magazine articles and special features, and has over 20 years of experience in résumé writing, employment interviewing and job counseling. Lieutenant Paul Patti is the author of three books: Silhouettes: An Andy and Gabrielle Amato Mystery; Death Mate; and Dead Time. According to the books description of his latest book, Dead Time, “In this mystery-science thriller, dead people are spilling government secrets, via their computer-stored consciousness! The government wants to shut everyone up, permanently, but an FBI Agent and a beautiful scientist fight to keep the dead people talking.”

About the
Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting. During the first half-hour of the show, the host, a nationally recognized expert on law enforcement, interviews a subject matter expert on the topic. During the second half-hour the program is joined by two other cops who give a street-level perspective to the conversation.

About the Host
Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond is currently a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Wednesday, January 02, 2008

Police History, Korea and Community Relations

January 2, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. Police officers who have written on history and community policing were added to the website.

Todd L. Shulman is a seven-year member of the Napa Police Department, (California) currently serving as a detective. An avid historian, Todd Shulman founded the Napa Police Historical Society in 2006 and has culled their archives for many of the photographs included in his book, Napa County Police. According the book description of Napa County Police, “with dazzling vintage imagery and rich historical text, Todd Shulman tells the tale of policing Napa County - from the Wild West days of the 1850s, through the boom era of the 1940s, and into the 21st century.”

Alfred F. McDonald, a retired Buffalo Police Department (New York) Lieutenant, was born and raised in Buffalo, New York. He served his country in the United States Navy during World War II from 1944 – 1947, was placed on inactive reserves and was called back to duty during the Korean Conflict in 1950. He served in the Navy again from late in 1950 through 1952. After being honorably discharged from the Navy, Alfred McDonald returned to civilian life as a husband and father. Having been brought up with strong family values and work ethic, Al worked hard at the railroad as a brakeman, until becoming a police officer in 1956. From there, Al’s career flourished and he advanced until reaching his retirement rank of Lieutenant. Alfred McDonald is the author of Korea ‘Operation War Dance.’

According to the book description, Korea – Operation War Dance is “one man’s personal account of shipboard life of the men on the U.S.S. Silverstein. It’s about being under attack, living conditions on the ship, every aspect of a sailor’s life during the time period; and, is a tribute to the brave men and women who served their country during the
Korean Conflict.”

Rick Braziel has been a member of the Sacramento Police Department for 28 years, and a Deputy Chief since 2002. In December 2007, he was appointed as chief of police of the Sacramento Police Department. He is a second generation police officer with his father Dick serving the Department for over 20 years. Rick Braziel consults and instructs for Humboldt State University in Teambuilding, Communication Skills, and Leadership. He received his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees in Communication from California State University, Sacramento.

In 2006, Rick Braziel received a Master of Arts in Security Studies (
Homeland Security and Defense) from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School. Rick is also a 2002 graduate and class spokesperson of the California Peace Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) Command College; and 2004 graduate of the Police Executive Research Forum’s (P.E.R.F.) Senior Management Institute for Police.

Rick Braziel is co-author of the book titled COP Talk: Essential Communication Skills for Community Policing.

According to Kevin Brown, of Montana State University-Northern, in the American Communication Journal, “In this text for
police officers the authors lay out the basics of the communication process with helpful vignettes derived from actual police experience to illustrate the principles. The authors lead the reader through a tour of contemporary communication contexts. The authors start with interpersonal communication and cover work groups, public speaking, community meetings, problem solving, network building and finally, public relations. The book is written for a beginning communication student and reflects an understanding that many police officers have had no formal communication training.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 820
police officers (representing 367 police departments) and their 1731 law enforcement books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.