Criminal Justice News

Tuesday, June 30, 2009

On Wisconsin! Badger State Becomes 30th to Enact Critical Seat Belt Law

New Text Message Bans Also Taking Effect

The Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) congratulates the State of Wisconsin for its passage of a primary seat belt law. This law gives police the authority to pull over a driver solely for not wearing a seat belt. Wisconsin becomes the 30th state to enact this lifesaving law. Based on other states' experiences, Wisconsin can expect its seat belt usage rate to increase 8-12 percentage points and its highway injury and death numbers to significantly decline. Wisconsin joins Florida, Arkansas and Minnesota in passing primary seat belt laws in 2009. All of these laws are now in effect.

On July 1st, new restrictions related to text messaging while driving go into effect in several states. Texting while driving becomes illegal for all drivers in Tennessee, Virginia and Utah. Novice drivers with a provisional or learner's permit will be banned from text messaging while driving in Mississippi. Cell phone and texting while driving restrictions take effect in a number of other states later this year.

GHSA reminds the public that law enforcement will be out in full force this holiday weekend. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, July 3 and July 4 are historically the deadliest days on our roadways. To remedy this, GHSA members, who are the State Highway Safety Offices, are working with police to crack down on drunk drivers, seat belt law violators, speeders and others who drive dangerously. Numerous states are conducting "100 Days of Heat" enforcement crackdowns to provide additional enforcement during the deadly summer driving season.

State highway safety laws are posted online at http://ghsa.org/html/stateinfo/index.html.

Free online event: Parole Violations and Revocations

July 8, 2009
2 pm–4 pm (Eastern Time)

Online event. Registration required, and free of charge

Provisions for community supervision of offenders, including probation, parole, and revocations for violations, vary significantly across the United States. Frustrating at times, this variety provides a valuable opportunity for states to learn from the policies, failures, and the successes in other states.

California prisons release nearly 120,000 prisoners each year, and roughly two-thirds of them will be back in prison within three years—the highest return-to-prison rate in the nation. Six out of ten admissions to California prisons are returning parolees, and on any given day, parole violators make up nearly a third of the state’s prison population.

Unfortunately, scientific knowledge about parole is so limited that, despite the fact that more than a dozen reports have urged an overhaul of California’s parole practices, exactly what needs to be done remains unclear.

This online panel will discuss the results from a three-year study recently completed and supported by the National Institute of Justice that examined the ways in which decision makers respond to parole violations in California. The study represents the largest and most comprehensive study of parole violations ever conducted, and the lessons learned will be instructive to policy makers and practitioners in other states.

The discussion will be moderated by Jeremy Travis, President of John Jay College of Criminal Justice. The panel includes:

Joan Petersilia, Ph.D. - Professor of Law, Stanford Law School, Stanford, California
Ryken Grattet, Ph.D. - Professor of Sociology, University of California, Davis
Thomas Hoffman - Director, Division of Adult Parole Operations, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation
Peggy Burke - Principal, Center for Effective Public Policy
Register today.
http://www.innovations.harvard.edu/spotlight.html?id=2393

Saturday, June 27, 2009

Quintin Peterson PSWA writing competition award winner

The Public Safety Writers Association (PSWA) held its annual conference at the Suncoast Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada from June 18-21, 2009. The annual conference is open to anyone writing crime and mystery fiction or non-fiction, technical writing for public safety magazines in print or online, or anyone interested in writing. On Sunday, June 21st, the winners of PSWA’s 2009 Writing Competition were announced at an award luncheon.

Crime fiction author
Quintin Peterson, who has been a police officer with the Metropolitan Police Department of Washington, DC for almost 28 years, took 2nd Place in the Short-Story Published category for A Dark Place, the story of a serial killer and the D.C. homicide detective tasked to track him down. It is available exclusively from Amazon.com as an Amazon Short.

Quintin Peterson has been writing crime fiction for a number of years. He is the author of two novels, SIN and The Wages of SIN, and several short stories, one of which, Cold as Ice, is featured in the George Pelecanos edited crime fiction anthology, D.C. Noir. He is also a contributor to the anthology, Bad Cop, No Donut, edited John L. French, which is scheduled to be published in 2010.

When his award-winning A Dark Place was first published in November of 2006, many contemporary crime writers praised Peterson’s work.
Quintin Peterson, a working police officer and natural born writer, pens crime fiction that is earned and alive.”
– George Pelecanos, author of THE NIGHT GARDENER and DRAMA CITY
"
Quintin Peterson writes with authenticity and honesty won from years of being a street cop, and in his chilling A Dark Place, he takes readers past the boring CSI or 'profiling' of a serial killer to show us the heart and soul of the badges who bring such monsters to justice."
– James Grady, author of MAD DOGS and SIX DAYS OF THE CONDOR
Quintin Peterson takes his readers into the dark places that only cops are compelled to enter. Then he shows them how such terrible access darkens the souls of those who enter too often. This dark, and well detailed, story is so real and so believable that it becomes a trip you won't soon forget.”
– Retired
NYPD Lt. Ed Dee, author of THE CON MAN’S DAUGHTER and LITTLE BOY BLUE
“You want to know how it's done? Read
Quintin Peterson's A DARK PLACE. Of all the crime writers out there, he's the one wearing the badge. He writes with a sure hand and is certain to please. Sit back and get chilled....”
– Ridley Pearson, author of CUT AND RUN and THE BODY OF DAVID HAYES
"A Dark Place is a chilling, expertly crafted thriller."
– Jim Patton, author of THE SHAKE and DYING FOR DANA
“With a serial killer who'll make your skin crawl, and a REAL inside look at how cops work by this talented Washington, D.C. cop/novelist, 'A Dark Place' is the latest from
Quintin Peterson's fertile, rooted-in-reality mind. He's the real deal.”

– Donald Bain, author of the MURDER, SHE WROTE mystery series, his memoir Murder HE Wrote: A Successful Writer's Life, and the Amazon Shorts selection, Ronnie and Me

All winners of the various categories of the PSWA writing competition receive plaques or certificates and publicity and recognition via a wide variety of public safety-related publications.

Founded in 1997 as the
Police Writers Club, the PSWA is open to both new and experienced, published and not yet published writers. Members include police officers, civilian police personnel, firefighters, fire support personnel, emergency personnel, security personnel and others in the public safety field. Also represented are those who write about public safety including mystery writers, magazine writers, journalists and those who are simply interested in the genre. The association also welcomes publishers, editors, agents and others who help writers realize their writing goals.

More Information
http://www.police-writers.com/peterson.html

Thursday, June 25, 2009

RAD: Rape Aggression Defense

On July 10, 2009, Conversations with American Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion former parole officer and RAD Instructor Kimberly Cheryl Elliot.

Program Date: July 10, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: RAD: Rape Aggression Defense
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/07/11/RAD-Rape-Aggression-Defense

About the Guest
Kimberly Cheryl Elliott spent 17 years and parole and probation officer for Missouri State Division of Probation and Parole. She “is a seasoned marketing professional with 18 years experience in pharmaceutical sales and management. As a victim of crime, she is very passionate about her career as founder and managing partner of Executive Defense Technology, LLC, an anti-victimization education firm. As a speaker, author, consultant and Nationally Certified RAD (Rape/Aggression/Defense) Instructor, she helps clients optimize their personal safety. As a seminar leader, she provides a comprehensive course that begins with awareness, prevention, risk reduction and avoidance, while progressing on to the basics of hands on defense training. Her clients include everyone from elderly church group members and housewives to employees of law firms, TV / Radio Stations and other Fortune 500 Corporations.”

Kimberly Cheryl Elliott is the author of Escape From The Pharma Cartel: My Life as a Member of the Pharmaceutical Drug Cartel; Take This Pill and... Sell It!: A Guide To Getting A Job In The Pharmaceutical Industry; Shattered Reality; and, Are Your Habits Killing You? A Complete Personal Handbook Of Safety Suggestions to Incorporate into Your Everyday Life: Because the Best Defense Is a Good Offensive Plan!

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in Law Enforcement, public policy, Government Technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in Law Enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/07/11/RAD-Rape-Aggression-Defense

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Unsolved Mysteries of our Judicial System and Sexual Assault Victims

We would love to have you help spread the story of our struggles in MO to remove sexual predators from our streets.

This is our family's struggle but as we fight - one family after another approach us with their struggles and lack of support to prosecute sexual offenders - especially in St Louis. How many children are now victims of not only their abuser but of the legal system that was to protect them? One mother working in the system was just fired in April because she wanted to pursue the case of her nanny video taping her 2 & 4 yr old boys for use in child porn. had video evidence and DNA. They told her to get over it - she is no longer working because she wanted justice. Another father is still fighting 21 years later because nothing has changed within our system - new laws - no follow through or prosecution.

We have a witness, we have other victims who have come forward. We are not a high profile case like the ones Mr. Robert McCulloch chooses. Ones he chooses and then looses because the children are lying and he knows it before going in but it gets him TV time and no one ever hears the outcome (2 such cases since Jan have been that way). Here in Missouri - one woman was just released from jail because as a teen she killed her father due to years of abuse that was never stopped and she saw him harming her siblings and chose to stop it one way or another. A very sad ending to a story that should have had intervention. How many others like her just suffer on a daily basis?

We need to speak out - we need a change.

Dream Catchers Myspace :

"SHATTERED REALITY"

A REAL-LIFE STORY OF A CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE VICTIM WHOSE PERPETRATOR IS STILL ON THE LOOSE DUE TO THE NEGLIGENCE OF OUR CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM!!!!

PLEASE WATCH THESE VIDEOS & EDUCATE YOURSELF---TEACH YOUR CHILDREN THAT IT IS OKAY TO TELL & IT IS NOT OKAY FOR ANYONE TO TOUCH THEM!!!

You Tube: Secret Life of a 15 Year Old Teen


PLEASE write these people and share your disgust and request a change in the way Sexual Abuse Cases are handled not only in Missouri but Nation Wide – this is not just our story – there are so many helpless children that need your voice, please take a moment to help – thank you –

Office of Governor Jay Nixon
P.O. Box 720
Jefferson City, MO 65102
(573) 751-3222
http://governor.mo.gov/contact/

Peter Kinder – Lt. Governor
ltgovinfo@ltgov.mo.gov

contact the victim services division of the Attorney General's office,
email: brenda.porter@ago.mo.gov
or call Brenda Porter at 573-751-1338.
Crime Victims' Rights

Attorney General: Chris Kostner
Missouri Attorney General's Office
Supreme Court Building
207 W. High St.
P.O. Box 899
Jefferson City, MO 65102
Phone: 573-751-3321
Fax: 573-751-0774
ag@ago.mo.gov

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

Public Safety Technology in the News

Private-Prison Plan Raises Concerns
Arizona Republic, (06/14/2009), JJ Hensley

A top Arizona corrections official has raised concerns about a proposal to sell off state prisons and allow private vendors to operate them. A bill introduced in the state senate as part of a budget package would allow private vendors to operate one or more of the Arizona State Prison complexes with a 50-year contract and an upfront payment of $100 million. Concerns cited by Department of Corrections Director Charles Ryan in a letter to Gov. Jan Brewer include the ability of for-profit prison companies to properly control volatile inmates in the state's maximum-security units. He also said that to save money, a private company would pay its employees lower wages and provide less training, which could lead to higher staff turnover, low morale and a risk to public safety.
www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/2009/06/14/20090614politics-doc-0614.html

Cigarette Ban Being Implemented in Va. State Prisons
Washington Post, (06/16/2009), Amy Gardner

Virginia is the latest state to begin banning cigarettes in state prisons. Plans call for a tobacco-free corrections system by February 2010. Eight of the state's 40 prisons are either smoke-free or allow employees to smoke only in designated areas, and employees and inmates can participate in smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy programs. Other states with prison smoking bans include California, Texas, Michigan, Colorado and Maryland. Some officials have expressed concern that a ban on smoking could heighten tensions among inmates. But Marilyn Harris, Virginia's deputy secretary of public safety, said based on her experience in the eight prisons where a smoking ban is in place, there is no cause for concern. Most local jails in Virginia are smoke free, so inmates are accustomed to doing without cigarettes once they enter a state facility.
www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/06/15/AR2009061502330.html

Program Broadened to Enhance Identification and Removal of Criminal Aliens
Imperial Valley (Texas) News, (06/16/2009)
www.imperialvalleynews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=5910&Itemid=1
New Program Enhances Identifying and Deporting Criminal Aliens in Nine Florida Counties
BorderFire Report, (06/20/2009)
www.borderfirereport.net/latest/new-program-enhances-identifying-and-deporting-criminal-aliens-in-nine-florida-counties.php

The Secure Communities program, a program administered by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) that simplifies the process for determining if an arrested individual is a removable criminal, is gaining in popularity across the country. Under this program, the fingerprints of anyone booked into jails in participating jurisdictions are screened in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) immigration databases. If a fingerprint match is found, the technology alerts ICE and the jail that submitted the fingerprints. ICE evaluates each case to determine the individual's immigration status and takes enforcement action after offenders complete their prison terms. Top priority is given to aliens who pose the greatest threat to public safety, such as those with prior convictions for major drug offenses, murder, rape, robbery and kidnapping. Recent news articles have focused on increased implementation of the program in south Texas, where five county sheriffs' offic! es became the latest law enforcement agencies to participate, and in Florida, where nine counties recently joined the project.

Marshall to Study Suspicious Fires
Associated Press, (06/21/2009)

Marshall University, located in Huntington, W.Va., will use a $198,000 federal grant to study the use of flammable liquids in relation to suspicious fires. J. Graham Rankin, an associate professor of forensic science, received the NIJ award for the two-year study. Rankin plans to build a database of kerosene and petroleum distillates commonly sold as charcoal lighters, paint thinners and industrial solvents. This group makes up the second most common class of accelerants used in arson cases behind gasoline. He will analyze samples to identify their chemical fingerprints for later use in fire investigations.
sundaygazettemail.com/News/200906210113

Would You Contact 911 Via a Text Message?
The Gazette, (0/21/2009), Jeff Raasch

Black Hawk County, Iowa, will become the first county in the nation to use text messaging in its emergency communications in July 2009. However, there are some drawbacks and for now, the capability is limited to customers using iWireless. It is thought that the tool will be very useful for teenagers, such as someone who is in a car with another teenager who has been drinking. It has also been touted as a viable alternative for residents with speech and hearing disabilities. A major concern is that texting, unlike phone calls and telecommunications device for the deaf technology, does not automatically provide a location and time lags are possible.
www.gazetteonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090622/NEWS/706229960/1006

Lancaster, Pa., Keeps a Close Eye on Itself
Los Angeles Times, (06/21/2009), Bob Drogin

In Lancaster, Pa., approximately 165 closed-circuit TV cameras soon will provide live, round-the-clock scrutiny of nearly all public space in this city of 55,000. This system includes more outdoor cameras than major cities such as San Francisco and Boston. Lancaster has outsourced this widespread surveillance system to a private nonprofit group whose civilian employees will call police as needed, with no direct government involvement. Hundreds of municipalities, including many major cities, have built or expanded camera networks since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Many have been funded by U.S. Department of Homeland Security grants. In Lancaster, however, business owners, civic boosters and city officials formed the Lancaster Community Safety Coalition, which installed its first camera in 2004.
www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-spycam-city21-2009jun21,0,3641451.story

Intergraph Deploys CAD System at MWAA Facilities
Trading Markets.com, (06/22/2009)

A computer-aided dispatch (CAD) system will improve security at Ronald Reagan Washington National and Washington Dulles International airports. Intergraph, a provider of engineering and geospatial software, has deployed a system that will integrate multiple security systems at the two airports and thus improve the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority's (MWAA) ability dispatch emergency assistance at both airports more quickly.
www.tradingmarkets.com/.site/news/Stock%20News/2382760/

Hillsdale Police Department Now "Tweeting" Notifications to Residents Through Twitter
Bergen Now, (06/22/2009), Carmine DeMarco

The Hillsdale (N.J.) Police Department has launched a Twitter account under the name of "HillsdalePDNJ. " Twitter is a free real-time short messaging service that works across multiple networks and wireless devices, in particular through the Web site http://twitter.com. Twitter offers the ability to post brief updates about daily activities in 140 characters or less. These message postings are then forwarded to anyone who has tuned in to that specific Twitter account via a computer or handheld device. Hillsdale thus joins a small group of police departments nationwide that have created Twitter accounts to inform citizens. Anyone can browse the Twitter Web site at anytime and use the search function to read HillsdalePDNJ updates.
bergennow.com/index.php/20090622386/Hillsdale/Hillsdale-Police-Department-NJ-New-Jersey-Twitter-tweet-tweeting-HillsdalePDNJ.html

Lake Ozark Police Get New Surveillance Cameras
Newsdesk KCRG, (06/19/2009)

Using a $100,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the Lake Ozark (Mo.) Police Department has purchased new surveillance cameras located of Business Route 54 overlooking the Bagnell Dam. The department will have access to three different cameras positioned at various locations to track license plate numbers and perform 24-hour surveillance.
www.connectmidmissouri.com/news/news_story.aspx?id=315311

Webinar on Interoperable Voice Communications, June 30, 2009

The NLECTC Communications Technologies Center of Excellence (COE) will be hosting a webinar on Interoperable Voice Communications on Tuesday, June 30th at 1:30 PM EDT.

To register for the event go to:
www.livemeeting.com/lrs/8001859620/Registration.aspx?PageName=pl0s1w7j57j16n34

Certified Field Search Instructors Training Course, August 13-14, 2009, Denver, Colorado
NLECTC-RM is pleased to announce we will be sponsoring a course which will qualify individuals as Certified Field Search Instructors (CFSI). Once certified, these individuals will be able to teach and certify Field Search users within your department or agency.

When: August 13 and 14 - 08:00-17:00
Where: Denver, CO, University of Denver Campus
Instructor: Dr. Jim Tanner, KB Solutions, Inc.
Cost: Free (attendees are responsible for their own travel costs).

Eligibility: The class is open to any representative of a Federal, State, or local governmental agency. Experience and proficiency with Field Search must be demonstrated by the applicant. Individuals who have attended an NLECTC sponsored Field Search class (“Managing Sex Offenders’ Computer Use”) will be given priority in selection. Other Field Search training (i.e. APPA, ICAC, HTCIA, or conference labs) will also be weighted in the selection process.

Applicants must provide a letter from their agency that states they are authorized to be trained as a Field Search Instructor.

Benefits: Individuals holding the CFSI qualifications are licensed to use the Field Search Curriculum and class practicals developed by KBSolutions. This allows them to teach one-day classes certifying government agency staff in the use of Field Search.

How to Apply: Contact Sue Kaessner (sue.kaessner@nlectc-rm.org) for an application.

Course Content: The course is a two day intensive seminar taught by the Field Search Project Manager. Students will utilize and test every aspect of FSWin and FSMac while learning the one day course curriculum. At the end of the course, students will demonstrate their expertise in Field Search through examination.

Space is limited, apply early.

June 24, 2009—Join an Online Discussion

Working with LGBTIQ Survivors of Violence

Today, at 2 p.m. (eastern time), in commemoration of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) will present a Web Forum discussion with Avy Skolnik on best practices for assisting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersexed, and queer (LGBTIQ) survivors of violence. Mr. Skolnik is the Coordinator for Statewide and National Programs at the New York City Anti-Violence Project, which serves New York’s LGBTIQ communities. He also facilitates the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs, a network of grassroots organizations dedicated to ending violence against LGBTIQ people; and serves as the coordinator for the New York State LGBT Domestic Violence Network. In addition, Mr. Skolnik provides training and technical assistance to community groups, schools, hospitals, clinics, and law enforcement on LGBTIQ violence-related issues, including intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and bias-motivated violence.

MORE
http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ovcproviderforum/index.asp

Monday, June 22, 2009

Forensic Investigator

On July 24, 2009, Conversations with American Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion with Esther McKay, a former Detective Senior Constable and Forensic Investigator with the New South Wales Police Force (Australia).

Program Date: July 24, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic:
Forensic Investigator
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/07/25/Forensic-Investigator

About the Guest
Esther Mckay served seventeen years in the New South Wales Police Force, attaining the rank of Detective (technical) Senior Constable. She worked in the area of Forensic Services for fifteen years, attaining expert status in crime scene examination and vehicle identification. She also worked in Training and Research, as well as Document Examination. She has a Diploma of Applied Science in Forensic Investigation (NSW Police), and was awarded the National Medal for service in 2001 and the Ethical and Diligent Police Service medal with fifteen-year clasp in 2008.

Esther Mckay was discharged from the force in 2001 with post-traumatic stress disorder as a direct result of her forensic work. Her best-selling autobiography, Crime Scene: True Stories from the Life of a Forensic Investigator.

Esther Mckay works actively in supporting traumatized serving and former Police and is the President of the Police Post Trauma Support Group. She was awarded the Pride of Australia Medal in 2007 for Community Spirit for her work with traumatized Police, and regularly speaks to various groups and schools about her life experience, writing and former forensic work. Esther is patron of the Australian Missing Persons Register and has been an Australia Day Ambassador since 2007. She lives in the Southern Highlands with her husband and two children.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
Police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles
Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in Law Enforcement, public policy, Public Safety Technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in Law Enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/07/25/Forensic-Investigator

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Friday, June 19, 2009

Careers in Corrections

On June 26, 2009, Conversations with American Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion with corrections official Tracy E. Barnhart.

Program Date: June 26, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Careers in
Corrections
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/06/27/Careers-in-Corrections

About the Guest
After completion of a Marine Corps combat tour of duty in Iraq in 1991, Tracy E. Barnhart completed the National Registry requirements as an Emergency Medical Technician. He responded to calls of emergency medical nature for over three years until he became a police officer for the City of Galion (Ohio). After three years on patrol he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant. Later leaving the City of Galion Tracy E. Barnhart was hired as the Chief of Police for the City of Edison (Ohio). After 3 years as chief of police, and with a total of ten years experience in law enforcement he changed careers leaping into the realm of corrections where he is currently employed at the Marion Juvenile Correctional Facility.

Tracy E. Barnhart is the
Law Enforcement coordinator the Tri-Rivers Public Safety Adult Education where he designs and coordinates continuing educational courses for law enforcement and correctional officers. He has established courses on verbal de-escalation, criminal behavior analysis, use of force, and ground fighting and take down techniques for law enforcement.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in Law Enforcement, public policy, Public Safety Technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in Law Enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/06/27/Careers-in-Corrections

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

Making Arrests in Domestic Violence Cases: What Police Should Know

By David Hirschel, Ph.D.

Police have been making more arrests in domestic violence incidents. In 2000, about 50 percent of intimate partner violence cases1 resulted in arrests, compared to 7 to 15 percent in the 1970s and 1980s. Research has revealed that some aspects of the change cause problems: too many victims are arrested and too few cases are accepted by prosecutors. The problem appears to arise in part from the practice of dual arrests - situations in which police arrest both parties involved in the altercation rather than trying to identify the primary aggressor. About 2 percent of domestic violence incidents result in dual arrests.

READ ON
http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/225458.pdf

Automatic License Plate Recognition

Dennis J. Lau

In an era of increasing threats to public safety and shrinking city budgets, judicious application of modern technologies are a force multiplier for police agencies who need to do more with less. Automatic License Plate Recognition (ALPR) is a case in point. ALPR uses cameras to capture digital images of license plates, then a computer to convert plate image into alphanumeric characters. That information, also referred to as “plate code”, can then be stored in a database and compared to other databases.

READ ON
http://www.police-technology.net/automatic_license_plate_recognition.html

National Southwest Border Counternarcotics Strategy

Drug trafficking across the Southwest border remains an acute threat to our homeland security and one of the top drug control priorities for the United States. Mexican drug trafficking organizations have come to dominate the illegal drug supply chain, taking ownership of drug shipments after they depart South America and overseeing their transportation to market and distribution throughout the United States. It is now estimated that 90 percent of the cocaine that is destined for U.S. markets transits the Mexico/Central America corridor. Mexico is the primary foreign source of marijuana and methamphetamine destined for U.S. markets and is also a source and transit country for heroin. Mexican drug trafficking organizations dominate the U.S. drug trade from within, overseeing drug distribution in more than 230 U.S. cities. These organizations also control the southbound flow of other forms of drug related contraband, such as bulk currency and illegal weapons.

READ ON
http://www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/publications/swb_counternarcotics_strategy09/swb_counternarcotics_strategy09.pdf

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Public Safety Technology in the News

Sci-Fi Writers on Mission to Imagine Unimaginable
Boston.Com, (05/23/2009), David Montgomery

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has enlisted the knowledge of science fiction writers, who as a group generally have extensive knowledge of science, to work with federal and commercial research and development departments. Members of Sigma, a writers' group, provide pro bono consultant services, receiving travel expenses only. Members have addressed meetings organized by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Army and Air Force, and others. Nearly one-third of Sigma members have doctorates, such as Catherine Asaro, author of two dozen novels, who has a doctorate in physics.
www.boston.com/news/nation/washington/articles/2009/05/23/sci_fi_writers_on_mission_to_imagine_unimaginable/

Standard Updated for Reporting Suspicious Activity
Federal Computer Week, (05/22/2009), Ben Bain

The federal government recently announced changes to its standard for how government law enforcement organizations should report observations on potentially suspicious activities concerning terrorist activities and how this information should be shared. These changes were driven by feedback from law enforcement and others.

Suspicious activity reporting (SAR) is now defined as "observed behavior reasonably indicative of pre-operational planning related to terrorism or other criminal activity. Civil liberties advocates believed the prior definition to be too broad. Also, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence's Program Manager for the Information Sharing Environment (PM-ISE) will continue with a pilot SAR information-sharing program using state and local intelligence fusion centers. The updated standard went into effect May 21.
fcw.com/articles/2009/05/22/web-suspicious-activity-report-update.aspx

Oklahoma Enlists a Program to Identify Remains From DNA
Associated Press, (05/24/2009)

The Center for Human Identification at the University of Texas offers free DNA testing to law enforcement agencies and medical examiners on a nationwide basis. Recently, the Oklahoma State Medical Examiner's Office began cataloging all of its unidentified remains and found 125 cases that could be sent to the center. The service is offered free of charge. A 2007 National Institute of Justice report stated there might be as many as 100,000 active missing persons cases in the country on any given day.
www.nytimes.com/2009/05/25/us/25dna.html?_r=1&ref=us

Crime Stats at the Click of a Mouse
Santa Monica Daily Press, (05/20/2009), Kevin Herrera

The Santa Monica Police Department recently launched a new crime mapping system that gives citizens direct access to crime data for nearly all crimes reported within the last 90 days. The system is updated daily and may be accessed at www.santamonicapd.org/crimemapping. Users can enter an address and a specified period of time ranging from one to 90 days, and the system will create an informative map of the area. The system may be searched by crime type, with a variety of geographic options.
www.smdp.com/Articles-c-2009-05-19-59320.113116_Crime_stats_at_the_click_of_a_mouse.html

Technology Lets Troopers Stay on the Highway
WALB News 10, (05/20/2009), Jim Wallace

Starting in July, the Georgia State Patrol is implementing an in-car computer system that will allow troopers to do most of their reports and work from the road. Computer-aided dispatch systems are being installed in offices and mobile computer terminals are being added to cars to help troopers be more efficient. The new dispatch system is needed to run the in-car system, which will include a GPS component that lets dispatch know where the vehicles are located at all times. The new system is expected to improve response time, increase efficiency and make the state patrol greener by cutting down on paper use.
www.walb.com/Global/story.asp?S=10397733&nav=menu37_2

Police Radar for Measuring Speeding Cars Improved
Science Daily, (05/29/2009)

Down-the-road (DTR) radar used in speed enforcement and the ballistic chronograph, which measures the speed of bullets, may soon be improved as a result of research recently conducted by the Office of Law Enforcement Standards at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Researchers John Jendzurski and Nicholas Paulter examined the four common methods used and developed and published uncertainty measurement formulas for each method. The formulas will help DTR radar users clearly understand the need for proper calibration. Also, researcher Donald Larson and Paulter have developed a ballistic chronograph to measure the velocity of a fired bullet that is 20 times more precise than is common. These chronographs are used during ballistic-resistant body armor testing.
www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090521112824.htm


Michigan to Shutter Eight Prisons in Budget Cutbacks
Detroit News, (06/06/2009), Mark Hornbeck

Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm has announced plans to close three prisons and five prison camps to reduce a state budget deficit. The closures would save $120 million and help erase a $1.7 billion budget deficit, but lawmakers say the plan could put the public at risk. Approximately 4,000 prisoners who have served at least their minimum sentence will be freed and 1,000 employees would be laid off, which will have a ripple effect on communities near the prisons. Inmates still serving terms will be shifted to other facilities. Corrections officials say a decline in felony convictions, more paroles and sentence commutations and double-bunking of some maximum security inmates are driving down the need for prison space. There are currently about 1,500 empty prison beds.
www.detnews.com/article/20090606/POLITICS02/906060362/1009/rss02

Obama Administration Announces New Tactics in International Drug War
Associated Press, (06/08/2009), Tim Korte

U.S. officials are ramping up plans to combat Mexican drug cartels. More than 10,800 people have been killed in Mexico by drug violence since December 2008, despite the deployment of more than 45,000 Mexican soldiers to fight the cartels. Steps planned along the U.S.-Mexico border to detect drug smugglers include building visual shields near border-crossing points so drug cartel spotters can't alert approaching motorists about inspections; improving nonlethal weapons technology to help officers incapacitate suspects and disable motor vehicles and boats used by traffickers; reviving an interagency working group to coordinate intelligence; and using more intelligence analysts to detect drug-dealing networks.
www.star-telegram.com/279/story/1417770.html

DCF Task Force Opts Against DNA Sampling
TampaBay Online, (06/04/2009), Katie Coronado

A Florida state task force has decided not to collect DNA samples from children in state care. The task force in the Department of Children and Families rejected the proposal made by law enforcement task members, who said collecting DNA could help provide information for locating or identifying foster children. But foster care advocates spoke against the proposal, saying it was a violation of privacy. Officials said as of early June, 309 foster children were missing in the state.
www2.tbo.com/content/2009/jun/04/dcf-task-force-opts-against-dna-sampling/news-breaking/

Monday, June 08, 2009

10th Crime Mapping Research Conference

For the first time, the MAPS Program is offering needs-based scholarships for the 10th Crime Mapping Research Conference.

Criteria: Applicant should not currently be involved in mapping or spatial analysis in the public or non-profit sector (unless new to the field and just getting started). Current NIJ grantees are ineligible.

Application process:
In 750 words or less: Describe why you are interested in implementing mapping or spatial analysis in your organization; Tell us how you expect the conference to benefit your goals in using mapping or spatial analysis in your organization's mission; You must provide the document in:

MS Word 97-2005 .doc format.
Use 12 point Times New Roman font.
Double-spaced lines.

Your supervisor must write a letter approving your attendance on your organization's letterhead.

Amount of scholarship: The awarded applicant will receive the following: Hotel room covered for 3 nights, airfare to the conference, as well as modified per diem of $150. Scholarship winners must cover any other incidental expenses.

We will award up to five scholarships.

Deadline: Monday, July 6, 2009. E-mail the required documents to Ronald.Wilson@usdoj.gov no later than 5 p.m. EDT.

Monday, June 01, 2009

The NIJ Conference 2009

June 15-17, 2009
Arlington, VA

For more than a decade, NIJ’s annual conference has brought together criminal justice scholars, policymakers, and practitioners at the local, state and federal levels to share the most recent findings from research and technology.

The conference showcases what works, what doesn't work and what the research shows as promising. It puts a heavy emphasis on the benefits to researchers and practitioners who work together to create effective evidence-based policies and practices. The DNA Grantees Workshop, formerly a separate event, is now an integral part of the NIJ Conference. Combining the former DNA Grantees Workshop with the NIJ Conference allows us to feature innovations in forensic sciences and related policy and resource issues.

Who Should Attend

Researchers interested in criminal justice
Policymakers responsible for shaping public safety or social services
Practitioners in criminal justice interested in technology and DNA
Students interested in criminal justice issues

MORE INFORMATION
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/events/nij_conference/welcome.htm