Criminal Justice News

Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Investigative & Security Professionals for Legislative Action

Political Action Committee presents its first two PAC checks in Washington D.C.

September 30, 2009: ISPLA, through its newly formed nonpartisan ISPLA-Political Action Committee (PAC), has provided another “first” for Investigative and Security Professionals. On Wednesday, September 23, 2009, ISPLA-PAC presented its first two PAC checks to longtime supporters of our professions.

ISPLA-PAC was officially organized on July 2 to support members of Congress that support the investigative and security professions. With our PAC, ISPLA’s impact on legislation is strengthened by the added ability to support candidates whose positions are aligned with ISPLA’s goals.

These ISPLA-PAC donations are but a small expression of our thanks to these two members of Congress who understand the needs of investigative and security professionals.

For more information regarding this release or ISPLA go to
www.ispla.org.

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

No One Deserves to be Abused

By T.D. Jackson
Special to American Forces Press Service

Sept. 29, 2009 - Some time ago a co-worker of mine came to work with what I thought was a black eye. I noticed it as I was talking to her, and when it registered, my eyes sort of slid away from her face and began looking everywhere but at her. I thought, "I am not going there," and I went on with my day without giving it too much thought. Because I wasn't sure, I didn't feel the need to say something, but the sad part is that if it had been a more obvious black eye, I know I wouldn't have said a thing; I would have been too scared.

Just as I learned in the suicide prevention training we've had here over the past few months, I should have asked those painful but caring questions: "Are you OK?" And in this case, "Did somebody hit you?"

October is National
Domestic Violence Awareness Month. One in every four women will experience Domestic Violence in her lifetime, and women 20 to 24 are at the greatest risk. Here's one you probably knew: Most cases of Domestic Violence are never reported to the police. And one to blow your mind: Men are victims, too. More than 834,000 men report being domestically assaulted annually.

People who are abused often feel as though no one will believe them, or they think they have nowhere to go for help. At Camp Atterbury or at any other military installation, God knows (pun intended) you can call the chaplain at any time. Behavioral Health, too.

Even though this was some time ago, every now and then I still wonder, "What if somebody did hit her? What if she needed to talk, but everyone – for different reasons – was afraid to talk about it?" As a leader, I failed her, but this anecdote is my grasp at redemption.

My former co-worker probably never will set her sights on this article, but if someone did put hands on her, I would tell her I'm sorry -- sorry it happened to her, and sorry I was a chicken. If I had weighed the cost of embarrassment against the cost of caring, I wouldn't be writing this now.

I'm hoping maybe she didn't have a black eye. She may have – as I have on many occasions – caught a pitch with her face during softball practice. She may have – as I have on many occasions – stood a little too close to the top cabinet door as it swung open. For all I know, she could have gotten popped by a feisty rugrat. I don't know, and I never will.

But what I do know is that although I cannot concern myself with every detail of a person's life, I can be aware of changes in behavior, moods and certainly appearance. I was in a leadership position, and along with that title comes responsibility. It is my responsibility to make sure my people are OK at work and at home. The mark of a good leader is the ability to listen, and, my friend, although I am late, I am all ears.

(T.D. Jackson works in the Camp Atterbury public affairs office.)

Friday, September 25, 2009

Departments Negotiate Pact to Help Keep Country Safe

By Gerry J. Gilmore
American Forces Press Service

Sept. 22, 2009 - An agreement between the departments of Defense and Homeland Security that calls for sharing some intelligence data with centers nationwide is part of post-9/11 efforts to harden America against another terrorist attack, senior department officials said recently. The 72 "fusion centers" are managed by state and local agencies. The centers collect information that can be used to combat terrorist threats.

Both the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 and the 9/11 Commission report published in 2004 state "that we were not doing sufficient information sharing between federal agencies and state and local agencies," Michael McDaniel, deputy assistant secretary of defense for homeland defense strategy and force planning, said during a recent interview with The Pentagon Channel and American Forces Press Service reporters.

DHS became involved in helping state and local officials establish fusion centers in their jurisdictions, McDaniel said. "That was great as a first step. But, one of the questions still was: 'How do you share this information?'" he said.

"The whole concept of a fusion center – what's inherent in the word 'fusion' – is a collaboration of information across multiple agencies at multiple levels," McDaniel said, "so that that information comes to a common center-of-gravity, if you will, and at that point is shared," as needed, with analysts from different agencies, including those working at the state and local level.

Much of the nation's intelligence-gathering capability is contained within the Defense Department, McDaniel said. The Defense Department and DHS, he said, have been collaborating over the past few years to provide intelligence information to state- and local-agency analysts.

"Now we have a means in which DoD-provided information can be shared" with state and local officials, McDaniel said, noting that information about foreign-terrorist threats and capabilities "will be very helpful" to local and state law enforcement officials.

However, the Defense Department is not a law-enforcement agency, McDaniel emphasized. The department "does not collect, does not store information" about people, he said.

In October 2007, President George W. Bush established the National Strategy for Information Sharing, which mandates that the federal government share information with state and local agencies that can be used to combat terrorism, said D. Joe Johnson Jr., DHS's chief of policy, planning and liaison for its National Security Systems Program.

The two departments last month negotiated an agreement to allow security-cleared fusion center employees the ability to access certain Defense Department Web sites through DHS's data network, Johnson said.

The Defense Department "does a lot of work overseas" gathering intelligence that's used to monitor terrorist threats, he said.

Providing access to this information to security analysts at state and local agencies, Johnson said, enables them "to come to better and more-informed conclusions about threats that are happening outside the United States that could potentially occur inside the United States."

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Sustainability of Victim Assistance Programs

On September 30, 2009, at 2 p.m. (eastern time), the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) will present a Web Forum discussion with Jenifer Markowitz, ND, RN, WHNP–BC, on best practices for sustaining victim assistance programs. Dr. Markowitz manages a project for the National Sexual Violence Resource Center regarding the sustainability of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner programs, which is funded by the Office on Violence Against Women. In addition, she is the Medical Advisor for AEquitas: The Prosecutor’s Resource on Violence Against Women. As such, she presents on a variety of forensic-related topics, including medical-forensic examinations, strangulation, drug- and alcohol-facilitated sexual assault, and expert witness testimony. She also conducts research; provides expert testimony, case consultation, and technical assistance; and develops training materials, resources, and publications.

Visit the OVC Web Forum now to submit questions for Dr. Markowitz and return on September 30 at 2 p.m. (eastern time) for the live discussion. Learn how to participate beforehand so you are ready for the discussion.

http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ovcproviderforum/asp/participate.asp

Sunday, September 20, 2009

Getting Ready: How Arizona Has Created a ‘Parallel Universe’ for Inmates

by Dora Schriro

Throughout my years of working in corrections, I began to notice that some things never changed. The “good” inmate stayed on his bunk, kept his head down and followed orders. Upon release, the same “good” inmate too often became a really lousy ex-offender. Back in the community, the “good” inmate was ill-equipped to make good decisions because the only thing he had learned to do in prison was sit on his bunk and take orders. Not having spent the workday or his leisure time productively while confined, the newly released offender was not prepared to find or keep a job or develop better relationships. Lacking these critical skills, it was more likely that “good” inmates would make bad choices on the outside.

READ ON
http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/226871.pdf

Verbal and Non-Verbal Indicators to Assault

By Tracy E. Barnhart

When we speak about the “use of force,” I notice more and more that officers either need or want the green light to be given to them before they act. Correctional officers deep down have an intimate fear when it comes to the use of force of either reacting too soon, or too late resulting in injury of someone, or not at all. They have a natural ingrained fear of the criminals themselves, their administration not backing them for their actions or decisions as well as their peers not having their backs because of those very same reasons. They have terms thrown at them such as, “Reasonable,” “Excessive,” and “Liability,” with no clear cut explained definitions as well as no clear cut directions or leadership by the administrations. It is often said that it is easier to ask for forgiveness than to request permission, but in today’s litigious society this may be true, but painfully unforgiving on your career.

READ ON
http://www.police-writers.com/articles/indicators_assault.html

Saturday, September 19, 2009

Drug Trafficking, Violence and Instability in Mexico, Colombia, and the Caribbean: Implications for US National Security

October 29-30, 2009
Holiday Inn Pittsburgh at University Center Oakland
Pittsburgh, PA, United States
Open to the General Public
Registration Fee: None

GSPIA’s Matthew B. Ridgway Center and the US Army War College will hold a two day conference on Thursday, October 29, 2009 and Friday, October 30, 2009 from 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. in the Holiday Inn University Center’s Schenley Room located in Oakland. More details and a list of presenters to follow. This event is free and open to all students, faculty, and interested community members.

Partners: U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute (SSI) and the University of Pittsuburgh Matthew B. Ridgway Center for International Security Studies

More Information
http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/events/details.cfm?q=116

PI Community Observes National Domestic Violence Awareness Month

API Community Leaders and Organizations Join Campaign & Call Attention to the Effects of Domestic Violence on Youth

San Gabriel, CA – To mark National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the Asian and Pacific Islander (API) Domestic Violence Task Force announces its fifth annual training event to call attention to the issues of domestic violence in the API community with special emphasis on the effects of domestic violence on youth. The training will be held on October 1st, at the Asian Youth Center, 100 W. Clary Avenue, San Gabriel, CA, beginning with a Press Conference at 9:30 am.

“There is no other crime that impacts society on so large a scale and so thoroughly devastates families as does domestic violence in all its forms. People hear ‘domestic violence’ and they think, ‘it’s between two adults,’ but it is not,” said Maria Foster, Chair of the API DV Task Force. “The courts are heavily burdened with aggressors who inflict pain and injury on their intimate partners. Thousands of homicides are committed every year leaving orphaned children in the care of family members or as wards of the State. Tens of thousands of teens run away every year to get away from the violence in their homes putting themselves at risk of being exploited, of criminal attack and even of death by exposure to the elements. Children are abusing alcohol and drugs in an effort to numb the pain of what they witness in what is supposed to be the safety of their home.”

The API DV Task Force, in conjunction with local government officials, community and social agencies, law enforcement and private citizens, are committed to eliminating domestic violence and reaching out to victims of domestic violence.

Maria Foster adds, “Domestic violence is a learned behavior. We see it cross from generation to generation. With education, support, and resources, we can increase awareness and safety for thousands of persons today, and at the same time and make better lives for families tomorrow.”

The API DV Task Force is supported by Assemblymember Mike Eng, San Gabriel City Mayor Juli Constanzo, Soroptimist International of Monterey Park/Rosemead, the Asian Youth Center, Neighborhood Legal Services of Los Angeles County, Asian Pacific Family Center of Pacific Clinics, the Asian Pacific Women’s Center, Chinatown Services Center Los Angeles, A Window Between Worlds, Center for Pacific Asian Families, Peace Over Violence, and the South Asian Network.

More information and registration
http://www.apidvtf.org/

Friday, September 18, 2009

Commercial Airline Hijack Procedures

On October 8, 2009, Conversations with American Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a former Naval servicemember and retired Commercial Airline Pilot Steve A. Reeves on commercial airline hijack procedures.

Program Date: October 8, 2009
Program Time: 1700 hours, Pacific
Topic: Commercial Airline Hijack Procedures
Listen Live:
www.americanheroesradio.com/commercial_airline_hijack_procedures.html

About the Guest
Steve A. Reeves started flying airplanes from a dirt strip located adjacent to a cotton field in northeast Arkansas. He took great pride in his ability to chase rabbits down the plowed rows of the fields - and live to tell about it. However, it didn't take long for him to realize that chasing rabbits didn't pay very well. He packed his bags and headed to the University of Kentucky. Upon graduating from college, he accepted a commission in the United States Navy. After one tour of duty, he thought that he'd had enough of flying and returned to the civilian world to pursue a career in construction management. One day while standing in the middle of a job site, Steve looked up in the sky to watch a commercial airliner fly over. The attraction was too powerful - he knew that he had to return to the sky. Twenty-one years later, Steve A. Reeves has logged over 12,500 hours in civilian, military, and commercial aircraft. He is a captain for a major airline and resides in Texas with his wife, Stacy, and their two daughters, Keegan and Kayleigh. Steve A. Reeves is the author of Squawk 7500 Terrorist Hijacks Pacifica Flight 762.

According to the book description of Squawk 7500 Terrorist Hijacks Pacifica Flight 762, “This fiction thriller is based on the real life experiences of a commercial pilot and gives you an exciting insider view of what it takes to fly a jet while managing crew, passengers—and a terrorist! Captain Mike Rendell started out his workday like all the workdays before – just another normal day of flying. After spending a raucous night partying with his crew, he and his first officer were looking forward to a nice relaxing flight to the West Coast.”

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
Police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in Law Enforcement, public policy, Public Safety Technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in Law Enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
www.americanheroesradio.com/commercial_airline_hijack_procedures.html

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Amazon Top 50 Reviewer Praises Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style

Editor's Note: The authors are retired law enforcement officials.

Charles Ashbacher, a Top 50 Reviewer on Amazon.com posted a review of Leadership Texas Hold ‘em Style. According to Amazon.com, a “Top 50 Reviewer” identifies Ashbacher as having “helped their fellow customers make informed purchase decisions on Amazon.com with their consistently helpful, high-quality reviews.” Charles Ashbacher has reviewed over 4,800 books and received nearly 14,000 votes from readers with an 88% ranking as finding his reviews helpful.

He said, in part, about
Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style, “This is without question one of the best books on effective leadership ever written and it is profound and entertaining as one of the most unusual yet best possible analogies is used.” And, “Many books on leadership tend to be correct in their content but dull in their delivery. In this case the content is superb and the delivery is even beyond that, the comparisons between poker and quality leadership are apt, educational and make this book one that should be read, re-read and intellectually digested.”

ABOUT THE BOOK
Using poker as analogy for
leadership, Captain Andrew Harvey, CPD (ret.), Ed.D. and Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA found the right mix of practical experience and academic credentials to write a definitive book for leaders. Working together, Harvey and Foster have written Leadership: Texas Hold em Style. Most often leaders find they are given a set of resources people, equipment, funds, experience and a mission. As Foster noted, "You're dealt a certain hand. How you play that hand as a leader determines your success."

MORE INFORMATION
www.pokerleadership.com

President Announces Plan to Expand Fight Against H1N1 Flu

American Forces Press Service

Sept. 17, 2009 - President Barack Obama announced today that the United States will continue to act aggressively to stop the global spread of the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus. The nation also is prepared to make 10 percent of its H1N1 vaccine supply available to other countries through the World Health Organization, he said.

There is broad, international recognition that the 2009 H1N1 pandemic presents a global health risk," Obama said in an announcement released today. "Millions of people around the world have been affected, thousands have died, and the virus continues to spread across international borders. The United States recognizes that just as this challenge transcends borders, so must our response.

"We invite other nations to join in this urgent global health effort," the president continued. "Working together, we can ensure that this vaccine limits the spread of the disease, reduces the burden on health care systems, reduces the risk of an even more virulent strain emerging and, most importantly, saves lives -- in the United States and around the world."

White House officials said the United States is taking this action in concert with Australia, Brazil, France, Italy, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, recognizing that diseases know no borders and that the health of the American people is inseparable from the health of people around the world. The United States will make the H1N1 vaccine available to the World Health Organization on a rolling basis as vaccine supplies become available, in order to help countries that otherwise will not have direct access to the vaccine.

The Food and Drug Administration officially licensed the 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine this week. The Department of Health and Human Services and the National Institutes of Health announced last week that one dose of the vaccine -- rather than two -- will be effective in developing immunity in most adults, and that the vaccine would be available in the coming weeks, earlier than originally anticipated.

White House officials said they are confident that the United States will have sufficient doses of the vaccine to ensure that every American who wants a vaccine is able to receive one. They recommend that early priority at home and abroad should be given to pregnant women, health care workers, peolple caring for infants less than 6 months old and other high-risk populations.

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

2009 NIJ Conference Highlights

The NIJ Conference brings together criminal justice scholars, policymakers and practitioners from the local, state and federal levels. They share research findings, ideas ,and practical and policy implications from the most recent studies about crime and justice.

NIJ has posted the following videos from the 2009 NIJ Conference:
· Adam Gelb on Reallocating Prison Expenses To Fund Stronger Probation and Parole Programs (2:25).
· Dr. Michael Kenney on How Terrorists Learn (1:48).
· Pamela K. Lattimore on Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative (2:38).
· Gary Slutkin on The Chicago Project for Violence Prevention (2:30).
· Dr. Aileen Wiglesworth and Detective Cherie Hill on Research in Action: An Elder Abuse Study Impacts How Law Enforcement Work Their Cases (10:59).
· The Honorable Steven S. Alm on 'Swift and Certain' Consequences in Probation and Parole (1:54).

To see additional highlights from the 2009 NIJ Conference including speeches by the Attorney General and Acting Assistant Attorney General, go to:www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/events/nij_conference/2009/welcome.htm.

Monday, September 14, 2009

Sheriff's Office Earns Award for Military Support

By Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael J. Carden
American Forces Press Service

Sept. 14, 2009 - Law enforcement and military service "go hand in hand" in Louisiana, and the Jackson Parish Sheriff's Office truly believes in selfless service, Sheriff Andy Brown said. That sort of thinking and culture of support for citizen troops has earned Brown's department a 2008 Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award. The department is one of 15 employers receiving the award, which recognizes exceptional support to employees serving in the National Guard or Reserve.

Winning a Freedom Award is a "tremendous honor," Brown said. But he added that supporting the needs of his National Guard and reservist employees is just a way for him and his department to contribute to the military's missions at home and abroad.

Whether it's continued health and pay benefits while deployed, it's Brown's policy to ensure his military employees and families are cared for, he said. The department gives full pay to its servicemember employees who are called away on duty for more than 12 months. It also provides indefinite health care, dental and life insurance benefits.

Brown also ensures that every supervisor and employee in his department thoroughly understands and implements servicemember rights spelled out in the Uniform Services Employment and Reemployment Act.

He said he demonstrates a positive attitude and displays concerns of support so that all leaders in the department understand his position.

"It is very important to me to try and give the Guardsmen [and] reservists and their family members a peace of mind during times of deployment by providing them with pay and benefits during that time," he said. "I feel that way there is one less thing they have to be worried about."

The department employs six part-time servicemembers. But many of its 110 employees formerly served on active duty or in the military's reserve components. Brown said his department actively recruits former and part-time military members, because he greatly values military experience in his officers.

"I take advantage of the discipline and training that [current and former servicemembers] have received or will receive," he said. "Law enforcement and the National Guard go hand in hand in our state due to the number of natural disasters which have occurred in our state in the last several years."

Army National Guard Command Sgt. Maj. Brent Barnett, a K-9 handler in the department, nominated Brown and the department for the Freedom Award. He said that although Brown has never served in the military, he should be described a "defender of freedom."

"Sheriff Brown's unwavering support to both veterans and current servicemembers is invaluable and a direct cause to deputies' success in their careers as citizen-soldiers," Barnett said in his nomination letter. "His practice of hiring retired and current servicemembers is a testament of his support to his community, state and country."

The National Committee for Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve was established in 1972 to promote cooperation and understanding between reserve-component members and their civilian employers and to assist in the resolution of conflicts arising from an employee's military commitment. It is the lead Defense Department organization for this mission.

Guard Joins Texas Rangers in Border Mission

By Air Force Master Sgt. Mike R. Smith
Special to American Forces Press Service

Sept. 14, 2009 - Texas Gov. Rick Perry has asked his state's National Guard to support a special group of Texas Rangers called "Ranger recon teams" at high-traffic and high-crime areas along the Mexican border, state Guard officials said Sept. 11. "The role of the Texas Joint Counter Drug Task Force Team is to support those operations," said Army Col. William Meehan, a public affairs officer with the Texas National Guard. "But then, this is something that we have been doing well for nearly 20 years with our counterdrug operations."

The only difference in this mission from the task force's normal counterdrug operation is that it's supporting the Texas Rangers, who launched this reconnaissance initiative to reinforce law enforcement along the Texas-Mexico border, Meehan said.

The task force, made up of about 200 Guard soldiers and airmen, can provide aviation, communications, security, medical, logistics, observation and planning support to the Rangers.

The Guard members, along with the Texas Rangers and Ranger recon teams, will be supported by Operation Border Star Unified Command, which includes Texas sheriffs, highway patrol strike teams and Department of Public Safety Aviation resources, according to a release from the governor's office. The effort was launched in early August to address the increase in burglaries of rural homes, ranches and hunting camps in remote areas along the border, state officials said.

Perry said the state's proven border security strategy is based on putting boots on the ground and equipping those personnel with the technology, training and funding to stem the flow of contraband across the border.

"Deploying Ranger recon teams to high-traffic, high-crime areas along the border will enhance our efforts," he said.

(Air Force Master Sgt. Mike R. Smith serves in the National Guard Bureau.)

States Need Federal Support to Address Distracted Driving

By: Barbara Harsha, Executive Director, Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA)

High-profile crashes and tremendous media coverage have dramatically increased the interest in distracted driving, particularly crashes involving cell phone use and texting. GHSA recognizes that all cell phone use and texting while driving are extremely dangerous and, therefore, strongly discourages anyone from using a cell phone for any purpose while driving. Drivers need to focus on the driving task and restore some common sense to driving.

To address this growing problem, the federal government does not need to sanction states that do not pass cell phone or texting while driving bans. Rather, there are a variety of actions the federal government can take to help states best respond to distracted driving.

These include:

Fund research to develop effective methods for enforcing texting and cell phone bans. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has already committed to such a project which is expected to begin this fall. While a number of states currently have banned texting and hand-held cell phone use, enforcing such bans has proven difficult. Additional study of the effectiveness of state bans is needed.

Fund research to determine the nature and scope of the distracted driving problem. It is very difficult to ascertain the scope of the distracted driving problem given that the public is not likely to readily admit guilt in a crash investigation. Special studies are needed using subpoenaed phone records to determine the involvement of phoning or texting in a crash. Further, there are contradicting research findings about the benefits of hands-free devices, and more study are needed on this issue.

Fund a media campaign to alert the public to the dangers of distracted driving. This effort is needed to help develop a culture that will make the practice socially unacceptable, similar to how drunk driving has come to be perceived with the vast majority of the public.

Develop model policies for employers encouraging them to ban cell phone use/texting by all employees driving for business purposes. Employers should be encouraged to communicate safe driving practices with their employees. These policies and programs should be evaluated for their effectiveness, best practices should be indentified, and a model policy should be developed and promoted.

Provide financial incentives for states that pass comprehensive graduated licensing laws that include cell phone/texting bans for new drivers. Congress has a history of providing incentives to get states to enact seat belt and other safety laws. A similar approach should be employed for teen driving. States should be incentivized to pass strong, three-tiered teen licensing laws that include a ban on using all electronic devices while driving. This approach makes sense for new drivers because parents/guardians can be the ones to enforce the restrictions. Additionally, these bans encourage new drivers to "get off on the right foot" when it comes to driving and not pick up dangerous habits.

Support technological solutions that minimize driver distraction. Technology has created this issue, but it can also be part of the solution. GHSA is very interested in systems that automatically disengage a driver's cell phone while the driver is driving. These voluntary systems could be particularly useful tools for parents of teen drivers or for employers who want to monitor their employees' cell phone use while on work business.


Distracted driving did not become a problem overnight, and it will not be solved overnight. There is a not likely to be a one-size-fits-all solution. The Secretary of Transportation's upcoming distracted driving summit offers an excellent start toward developing a comprehensive solution that embraces technology, legislation and educational approaches.

Sunday, September 13, 2009

Domestic Violence Training

API Community Observes National Domestic Violence Awareness Month API Community Leaders and Organizations Join Campaign Call Attention to the Effects of Domestic Violence on Youth

San Gabriel, Ca – To mark National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, the Asian and Pacific Islander Domestic Violence Task Force announces its fifth annual training event to call attention to the issues of domestic violence in the API community with special emphasis on the effects of domestic violence on youth.

The training will be held on: October 1st, at the Asian Youth Center, 100 W. Clary Avenue, San Gabriel, Ca, beginning with a press conference at 9:30 am.

“There is no other crime that impacts society on so large a scale and so thoroughly devastates families as does domestic violence in all its forms. People hear ‘domestic violence’ and they think, ‘it’s between two adults,’ but it is not,” said Maria Foster, Chair of the API DV Task Force. “The courts are heavily burdened with aggressors who inflict pain and injury on their intimate partners. Thousands of homicides are committed every year leaving orphaned children in the care of family members or as wards of the State. Tens of thousands of teens run away every year to get away from the violence in their homes putting themselves at risk of being exploited, of criminal attack and even of death by exposure to the elements. Children are abusing alcohol and drugs in an effort to numb the pain of what they witness in what is supposed to be the safety of their home.”

The API DV Task Force, in conjunction with local government officials, community and social agencies, law enforcement and private citizens, are committed to eliminating domestic violence and reaching out to victims of domestic violence.

Maria foster adds, “Domestic violence is a learned behavior. We see it cross from generation to generation. With education, support, and resources, we can increase awareness and safety for thousands of persons today, and at the same time and make better lives for families tomorrow.”

The API DV Task Force is supported by Assemblymember Mike Eng, Mayor Juli Constanzo, Soroptimist International of Monterey Park/Rosemead, Asian Youth Center, Neighborhood Legal Services of Los Angeles County, Asian Pacific Family Center of Pacific Clinics, Asian Pacific Women’s Center, Chinatown Services Center Los Angeles, A Window Between Worlds, Center for Pacific Asian Families, Peace Over Violence, and the south Asian Network.

Contact: Maria Foster (951) 313-7531

Patriots Day 2009

I was a D.C. cop for 35 years and in that capacity I have experienced many different protests and demonstrations. I was always on the other side of the fence and made arrests or processed 100s of demonstrators and protesters. I believed that most of these people were misguided into believing that their protest would make a difference. Many of these people were very passionate about their cause, while others were there for the thrill or just to say they were there. The only protest that I thought made a difference was the Vietnam Veterans who marched and then lobbied their individual congress members. They changed a few minds and opened a few more.

Today, I was part of history. I stood on the West lawn of the United States Capitol along with thousands of other concerned Americans. My participation was easy as I only live 25 minutes from the Capitol. Of course, I was there because, like so many of the other patriots around me, I wanted to have a voice. These patriots sacrificed much more coming from all over the country to show our Congress and our President how we feel about the Healthcare Bill, Cap and Trade, Immigration, Deficits, acorn and higher taxes.

America has awakened from being Nixon’s silent majority to being a loud voice for Freedom and fair representation of our values and beliefs. Speaker after speaker spoke of our country’s history, our country’s future and how this public Tea Party in the Nation’s Capitol would make a difference with our elected leaders.

People sang songs and lead chants of USA, USA and Don’t Tread on Me. Signs accused President Obama of lying, promoting socialism and trying to cripple the CIA and our heroic troops. Nancy Pelosi and Barney Frank were also deserved targets of ridicule for their ignorant remarks and deceit. Taxes and the Healthcare Bill were the main focus of descent, while immigration and the deficit seemed to creep into every oratorical lament.

This crowd believes in America. Believes in what she means to the world. Believes in our sacred Constitution and our individual rights. Although this massive gathering of concerned and dedicated Americans will undoubtedly send a clear message to Congress and the President. The real message will be experienced in 2010 when the voters of America exercise their right to be represented by someone who believes in the people, the Constitution and Freedom.


Joseph B. Haggerty Sr.

Wednesday, September 09, 2009

Providing Campus Crime Awareness

Today, (9.9.09) at 2 p.m. (eastern time), the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) will present a Web Forum discussion with Alison Kiss, M.S., on best practices for providing campus crime awareness.

Ms. Kiss is the Director of Programs at Security On Campus, Inc. (SOC), in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where she provides support to victims of college campus crime and oversees all SOC programs, including National Campus Safety Awareness Month and the Safe On Campus Peer Education Program. She is a faculty member with the Jeanne Clery Act Compliance Training Program, where she teaches the Victim Support Services Module, and has presented internationally on trauma, crisis response, and issues specific to sexual assault on college campuses. She also has served as an expert witness for court proceedings on sexual assault on college campuses.

Visit the OVC Web Forum now to submit questions for Ms. Kiss and return at 2 p.m. (eastern time) for the live discussion. Learn how to participate beforehand so you are ready for the discussion.

MORE INFORMATION
http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ovcproviderforum/index.asp

Monday, September 07, 2009

Retired Investigator Nails Profile of North Side Strangler

In the middle of July, Steven Spingola, a retired Milwaukee Police Department lieutenant of detectives, authored the e-magazine article The Killer in Our Midst: the Case of Milwaukee’s North Side Strangler exclusively for Amazon.com.

The primary investigator for two of the homicides linked to the North Side Strangler serial killer, Spingola provided this profile of the yet identified perpetrator:

  • An African-American male nearing age 50;
  • A person who has committed acts of violence but has “fallen through the cracks” of the system;
  • A suspect who kills outside his residence because he resides with a significant other;
  • A man others would describe as a regular Joe; and,
  • An individual employed at a menial job.

As the publisher of The Killer in Our Midst: the Case of Milwaukee’s North Side Strangler, Badger Wordsmith congratulates Steve Spingola for the accuracy of his work. On September 7, the Milwaukee Police Department annoucned the arrest of Walter E. Ellis, an African-American male, age 49, for crimes committed by the North Side Strangler.

“It’s great to know that the Milwaukee Police Department’s tremendous effort to identify a suspect in these horrific offenses has paid-off,” said Spingola. “It will be interesting to see how many other crimes are ultimately cleared.”

In recent weeks, Mr. Spingola’s e-magazine article climbed as high as #12 on Amazon.com’s Kindle formatted “crime and criminology” list.


Read Killer in our Midst

Technology on the Battlefield

Editor's Note: Very similar to police simulation training

MILES 2000 training system which records the Soldiers in training which in turn adapts their movements and actions into an animated simulation of their exercises. Produced by Staff Sgt. Douglas Salewsky.



Sunday, September 06, 2009

Marines helping Marines

Editor's Note: The video is about the career of former USMC Servicemember Bob Hamer and featuring some of the undercover tape in a NAMBLA investigations. This was put together by Sgt Daniel Asmelash of the Wounded Marine Career Foundation. The WMCF teaches injured servicemen the skills needed to get work in Hollywood.



More about Bob Hamer at:
http://www.military-writers.com/marinecorps/bob_hamer.html

Wednesday, September 02, 2009

Ohio Public Safety Department Goes Beyond Call of Duty

By John J. Kruzel
American Forces Press Service

Sept. 2, 2009 - More than one in 10 employees of the Ohio Department of Public Safety is a member of the National Guard or reserves. So when citizen-soldiers on staff are called to active duty and asked to trade their civilian attire for a military uniform -- as 155 currently are -- the department also fulfills its obligation to the country -- and then some.

As is the case with all law-abiding civilian employers, the Ohio Department of Public Safety, or ODPS, promises to keep servicemembers' jobs in place until they return. But the Columbus-based ODPS also goes above and beyond the call of duty.

"I'm a Vietnam vet myself, and I knew how important it was to get letters from home, get letters from loved ones. It was contact with what we called 'the world' back then," said ODPS Director Henry Guzman.

Bringing with him the lessons he learned during his years of service, Guzman created a military and veterans committee of current and former servicemembers to oversee related issues at the department.

"We meet every month, and we talk about issues for our employees; we talk about programs that might be a benefit for our employees," he said.

Some of the topics the committee oversees are the additional benefits the department offers, including differential pay and continued family medical and life insurance benefits. In addition, deployed members continue to receive annual raises, seniority and promotion opportunities.

The committee also provides special recognition. "Every quarter, we select an employee that has prior service to be the employee of the quarter, and from that group we select a military employee of the year," he said. "And that's our way of thanking the men and women who have served."

The committee also implemented a comprehensive "ODPS Military Heroes" Web site and published an extensive guide for military members, their families, fellow employees and agency leadership.

Additionally, the ODPS information technology team created a unique modification to a popular personnel software called "PeopleSoft" that establishes an electronic platform for managing their support of uniformed services employees, veterans and their families.

"The system requires that the supervisors enter pertinent data about the military employee, and it automatically generates notices for monthly follow-ups with the families," Guzman said. "It reminds the supervisor, 'Have you contacted Joe Smith's family this month?'

"In the minutiae of all the work that needs to be done," he continued, "people are busy and need those kinds of reminders. And so we created this system that helps us track their employees and reminds them to call their family members."

ODPS will receive the Freedom Award along with 14 other employers in a ceremony here Sept. 17. The Freedom Award, instituted in 1996 under the auspices of the National Committee for Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve, recognizes exceptional support from the employer community.

The Freedom Award recognizes U.S. employers that rise above the requirements of the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act. ODPS previously received numerous ESGR state awards for their support for National Guard and reserve employees, including the Above and Beyond Award and Pro Patria Award.

Providing Campus Crime Awareness

On September 9, 2009, at 2 p.m. (eastern time), the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) will present a Web Forum discussion with Alison Kiss, M.S., on best practices for providing campus crime awareness. Ms. Kiss is the Director of Programs at Security On Campus, Inc. (SOC), in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where she provides support to victims of college campus crime and oversees all SOC programs, including National Campus Safety Awareness Month and the Safe On Campus Peer Education Program. She is a faculty member with the Jeanne Clery Act Compliance Training Program, where she teaches the Victim Support Services Module, and has presented internationally on trauma, crisis response, and issues specific to sexual assault on college campuses. She also has served as an expert witness for court proceedings on sexual assault on college campuses.

Visit the OVC Web Forum now to submit questions for Ms. Kiss and return on September 9 at 2 p.m. (eastern time) for the live discussion. Learn how to participate beforehand so you are ready for the discussion.

http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ovcproviderforum/asp/participate.asp

Tuesday, September 01, 2009

Making Money with a Computer Virus

Running a large number of websites and a small office network has certainly given me a lot of experience in being exposed to the dangers of Viruses, Trojans and other MalWare. Also, having taught an introductory course in computer crime and written a book on technology - well, I have at least a pretty good idea about the dangers of the Internet. But, I didn’t think I would ever fall into a way to make money with computer viruses.

It started over a year ago. The first indication was the network slowing - then, several of the more popular websites were hacked. How a keylogger program became installed - well, I have my suspicions. I did some research and found an online computer repair company. Rather than take all the computers in or call a technician to the office, I figured I’d roll the dice.

I was very pleased an hour later. Remotely, the company found, killed and then restored - for a single - very reasonable price - my computer. Heck, I signed up with for year which included tuning and optimizing all computers. For the next year, every once a while, we went online and the company remotely scanned and optimized.

The year was great - but, not having had any recurrences, I let the contract lapse. Six months later, I did it this time. In an effort to improve broadcast sound quality - I did something stupid. I disable the firewall and virus protection. Really, it should have been okay. I had I remembered to re-activate the programs. The next day - we were slammed.

My fault. I contacted the remote technicians. This time - same great service, but the Trojan had burrowed deep into a single machine. It took longer - but they were able to restore everything. I was so pleased, I told the technician via chat that I would be blogging about my satisfaction; and, link to them. This honest guy says, “You ought to just become an affiliate.”

That was an easy decision. Over the last 18 months I have referred dozens of people to them - each one was as satisfied as I was. I never imagined I could become an affiliate. Because of my websites, I am an affiliate with several companies. None was this easy - nor, do I have such a personal connection. I signed up, they created a page - at no cost to me. I then registered a domain, pointed to the sub-domain they had created - and, well I am in business.

There is one last cool part - I can sign up people to be affiliates and - well, get a small commission of the people they refer. Can you imagine - all the people, all the computers, all the knotheads creating viruses - now I can make a little money helping people clean their machines!

First, if your machine is infected, or slow, I strongly recommended these technicians - it’s done remotely and very cool to watch your cursor move on its own. Second, if you would like be an affiliate - that’s right, make money with computer viruses, I encourage to click on the link and sign up!

Computer Repair

If you scroll down, on the right hand bottom you will see a link to become an affiliate.