Criminal Justice News

Thursday, December 31, 2009

Border Patrol Seizes SUV Loaded with Marijuana

December 31, 2009): Yuma, Ariz. – Border Patrol agents intercepted a drug smuggling attempt and seized more than 900 pounds of marijuana early today near San Luis, Ariz. Border Patrol agents in Arizona were able to chase down this Ford Bronco and seize almost a thousand pounds of marijuana that was loaded in the back cargo area.

At about 1:30 a.m., Border Patrol agents assigned to the Yuma Station observed a 1989 Ford Bronco drive up to the primary border fence several miles east of the San Luis, Ariz. port of entry. When the vehicle stopped near the fence, several individuals who had been waiting atop the fence loaded large bundles into the vehicle.

The driver then sped away from the border at a high rate of speed. Despite attempts by the driver to blend in with local traffic, Border Patrol agents spotted the Bronco and attempted to stop the vehicle. The driver failed to yield to the agents’ emergency equipment and then turned around and headed back toward the border.

Agents successfully deployed a tire deflation device, flattening three of the vehicle’s tires. The vehicle eventually came to a stop just north of the border fence where the driver and two other occupants exited the Bronco and climbed the fence into to Mexico to evade arrest.

Agents discovered 34 plastic-wrapped bundles of marijuana stuffed inside the vehicle. A total of 929 pounds of marijuana with an estimated street value of $743,200 was seized. The marijuana and Ford Bronco were turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration.

During the month of December, Yuma Sector Border Patrol agents prevented more than 5,000 pounds of marijuana from being delivered to American streets.

Wednesday, December 30, 2009

Agents Investigate New Tunnel Found in Nogales



Wednesday, December 30, 2009:A sink hole found in a Nogales city street two days before Christmas, west of the DeConcini port of entry, prompted city officials to contact the Nogales Border Patrol Station on Tuesday to investigate. The city had placed a steel plate over the sink hole as a temporary fix to facilitate street traffic during the pending holiday.

The tunnel originates from the Grand Avenue Storm drainage system in Mexico. A plug of red brick and mortar was used to conceal the tunnels entrance. A rope, a bucket, and digging tools were found inside the incomplete tunnel. Smuggling organizations often use existing drainage tunnels to aide their smuggling attempts. Remediation will be completed on the uncompleted tunnel soon.

“Tunneling attempts present a threat to our homeland security,” said Nogales Station Patrol Agent in Charge Alan F. White, “We aren’t just worried about drugs and illegal aliens, but also about the potential of terrorists and their weapons entering our nation in this manner. We will continue to maintain our vigilance to ensure that we stop any threat before it enters our country.”

This is the second illicit tunnel discovered in Nogales, Ariz., since October this year. Last fiscal year, a total of 20 tunnels were discovered. Cooperation between the Border Patrol and the City of Nogales has proven to be fruitful as they work together to remediate tunnels and repair damaged city infrastructure. Tunneling is a clear indicator of the frustration smugglers are experiencing and illustrates their willingness to use any means to continue illegal operations.

Border Patrol Seizes More than $850,000 of Methamphetamine



December 29, 2009): El Centro Sector Border Patrol agents assigned to the Indio Station and working the Highway 111 checkpoint seized more than 26 pounds of methamphetamine. A red luxury sedan entered the Highway 111 checkpoint on Monday evening for inspection. During the primary inspection, a Border Patrol canine team performed a cursory inspection of the vehicle. The canine alerted to the trunk and the vehicle was referred to secondary for further inspection. A subsequent scan of the vehicle using a large-scale imaging system revealed an anomaly under the spare tire located in the trunk of the vehicle. Agents discovered 12 vacuum-sealed bags of a crystalline substance in the area beneath the spare tire. The crystal substance tested positive for the properties of methamphetamine.

The methamphetamine weighed approximately 27 pounds and has an estimated value of more than $850,000. The driver, the vehicle and methamphetamine were turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration.

El Centro Sector has witnessed a significant increase in the amount of narcotics being seized this year. In the few months since the fiscal year began on October 1, the El Centro Sector has already surpassed last fiscal year’s total amount seized of heroin, methamphetamine, and cocaine.

Tuesday, December 29, 2009

Officers Make First Significant Marijuana Seizure at New Anzalduas Border Crossing



December 28, 2009: U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers working at the Anzalduas and Hidalgo international bridges seized approximately 248 pounds of marijuana in two separate and unrelated enforcement actions. The combined estimated street value of the marijuana is close to $198,000.

On December 23, CBP officers working at the Anzalduas/Reynosa International Bridge came in contact with a northbound 1998 Chevrolet Tahoe towing a utility flatbed trailer. The driver of the Tahoe was identified as David Rodriguez, a U.S. citizen, age 20 from Mission, Texas. Rodriguez was accompanied by his 19-year-old wife and two minor children, ages one and two.

At primary, officers noted discrepancies to the trailer’s undercarriage. After the initial primary inspection, a CBP officer referred the vehicle, flatbed trailer and occupants to secondary for further inspection. In secondary, “Jango," a narcotics detector dog, alerted officers to narcotic odors emanating from the utility trailer. A non-intrusive imaging system scan indicated anomalies under the trailer floor. While conducting an intensive examination of the utility trailer, CBP officers found 104 marijuana packages hidden under the trailer’s floor.

The marijuana packages weighed approximately 123 pounds with an estimated street value of close to $98,000. CBP officers arrested Rodriguez on federal drug charges. After his arrest, Rodriguez was transferred to the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement special agents who continue to investigate this failed smuggling attempt. Rodriguez’s spouse and children were released.

On the same day, CBP officers at the Hidalgo/Reynosa International Bridge came in contact with a northbound 1996 Ford Explorer. The driver of the Explorer was identified as Diana C. Ramirez, a Mexican citizen, age 21 from Houston, Texas. Ramirez was accompanied by a 13-year-old female passenger.

A CBP officer referred the driver, passenger and Explorer to secondary for further inspection. In secondary, officers noted discrepancies to the Explorer’s four tires. While in secondary, "Laika," a narcotics detector dog, alerted officers to narcotic odors emanating from the Explorer’s four tires. A non-intrusive imaging system scan revealed anomalies inside the Explorer’s four tires. CBP officers dismantled the tires and all tires were found to conceal metal containers full of marijuana. In total, CBP officers removed 24 marijuana packages that were found hidden inside the metal containers. The marijuana packages weighed approximately 125 pounds with an estimated street value of close to $100,000. CBP officers arrested Ramirez on federal drug charges.

After her arrest, Ramirez was transferred to the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement special agents who continue to investigate this failed smuggling attempt. The 13-year-old minor was released to the custody of the local office of the State of Texas Child Protective Services. Pending appearance before a U.S. Magistrate, both Rodriguez and Ramirez remain incarcerated.

Hector A. Mancha, CBP port director, Hidalgo/Pharr and Anzalduas said, “The Anzalduas crossing became operational less than 10 days ago and this is the first significant seizure at the Anzalduas International Bridge.” Mancha further said, “I commend our frontline officers and K-9 teams for their great enforcement work during the holiday season and for intercepting these two drug loads.”

Monday, December 28, 2009

Black Tar Heroin Hidden in Woman’s Boots



December 28, 2009: U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Brownsville and Matamoros International Bridge discovered $129,000 in black tar heroin hidden in the boots of a female; one U.S. citizen was arrested. On December 27, primary CBP officers at the Brownsville and Matamoros International Bridge encountered a woman as she applied for entry into the country as a pedestrian. At primary CBP officers referred the pedestrian for secondary inspection. Once in secondary the woman was identified as Jessica Gayle Smith, a 21-year-old U.S. citizen from Brownsville, Texas. CBP officers’ examination of the woman resulted in the discovery of two packages concealed within her boots. "Boger," a narcotics detector dog, further alerted officers to the odor of narcotics emanating from the footwear. CBP removed one package from each boot and seized a combined total of 2.3 pounds of black tar heroin.

The black tar heroin in this enforcement action has an estimated street value of nearly $129,000. Jessica Gayle Smith was arrested by CBP officers and turned over to the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement special agents who continue to investigate the seizure and processed her on federal drug charges.

“Brownsville CBP officers’ enforcement on primary resulted in the discovery of this load of black tar heroin. I congratulate our officers for stopping these dangerous drugs from being brought into the country,” said Michael Freeman, CBP port director in Brownsville.

Southbound Operations Seize Nearly $17,000 Exiting the U.S.

December 28, 2009: U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Douglas port of entry stopped an illegal exportation of nearly $17,000 while screening traffic going into Mexico. On December 23 at about 3:30 p.m., CBP officers were screening traffic going into Mexico as part of a southbound operation. The officers selected a 2003 Honda Accord being driven by a 34-year-old man from Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico.

Further inspection revealed that the man was attempting to smuggle nearly $17,000 out of United States. The CBP officers found the illegal currency concealed in the man’s briefcase and the glove-compartment of the vehicle he was driving.

CBP officers seized the illegal currency. The man was turned over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement for further questioning.

Day Before Christmas Officers Seize Marijuana at Naco Port of Entry

December 28, 2009: U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers stopped a drug-smuggling attempt the day before Christmas, when they seized nearly 70 pounds of marijuana concealed in various hidden compartments of a vehicle. On December 24 at about 11 a. m. CBP officers were screening travelers when they became suspicious of a 1998 Chevrolet Pick-up truck being driven by a 72-year-old man from Cananea, Sonora, Mexico.

Using high-tech tools, CBP officers searched the man’s vehicle and discovered that the quarter panels, the third door, the front dash, the bench seat, and the air filter all contained packages of marijuana. The total weight of marijuana was nearly 70 pounds with an estimated street value of $106,000.

CBP officers seized the vehicle and the marijuana. The man was turned over to the custody of Immigration and Customs Enforcement for further investigation and prosecution.

Friday, December 25, 2009

460th Police Department Listed

December 25, 2009: With the addition of the Pittsfield Police Department (Massachusetts), Police-Writers.com now lists books written by police officers from 460 state and/or local law enforcement agencies. The book, Rising Through the Ranks: Leadership Tools and Techniques for Law Enforcement, was written by the current Chief of Police, Mike Wynn; and, is one of the 2379 books written by 1081 police officers in the United States.

For more information, visit the website:
http://www.police-writers.com/

RUDY GIULIANI running scared?

DECORATED NY COP’S New Book, NYPD Blue Lies, sends “AMERICA’S MAYOR” RUDY GIULIANI running scared?

(New York, NY)—Is it possible that the hard hitting, book which has sold out at Barnes & Noble and Amazon, NYPD Blue Lies; by former NYPD Sergeant Charles Castro has send Rudy Giuliani running scared?

Rudy Giuliani has announced that he will not run for office, instead he will give his support to the weak Republican Rick Lazio. Lazio who was defeated years ago by Hillary Clinton is set to challenge a top democrat, either U.S. Senator Gillibrand or the equally weak NY Gov. David Paterson.

Although Castro thinks that Giuliani would have been a stronger candidate he feels that Rudys past is “not all that pretty”.

In Castro’s book he exposes the harmful effects of Giuliani’s lack of leadership, the violation of citizen’s rights, racial tension caused by Rudy, and about how Rudy condoned police corruption. “The Giuliani administration gave the appearance that they were holier than thou, yet they were just as dirty as any administration before them. Cops that committed sickening crimes against women, Latinos, and blacks were treated with kid gloves”. “I dare anyone to challenge my claims”.

“I think Rudy will wait for along time before he considers running for office again, his exploitation of September 11, abuse of power and weakness against dirty cops has come back to haunt him”.

Charles Castro led the fight thirteen hundred blacks & Latinos and ultimately won—a $27 million anti-discrimination class action lawsuit against Giuliani and the city of New York.

Thursday, December 24, 2009

Twas the Night Before Christmas

Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the city
Not a thug was stirring oh my what a pity;
And the flat saps were hung by the jail with care,
In hopes they wouldn’t be used in there.
The brass were nestled all snug in their beds,
While visions of paperwork danced in their heads;

READ ON
http://www.police-writers.com/night_before_christmas.html

South Texas Border Patrol Agents Seize $5 Million Worth of Marijuana

December 23, 2009: Early this morning, U.S. Border Patrol agents assigned to the Zapata, Texas station seized a load of marijuana weighing more than three tons. Responding to reports of suspicious activity in the vicinity of Falcon Shore Drive, agents observed a travel trailer with cellophane-wrapped bundles visible through the windows. A Border Patrol canine team detected the possible presence of contraband in the trailer.

Agents searched the trailer and found 284 bundles. The bundles contained marijuana with a total weight of 6,254 pounds and an estimated street value of $5 million.

Agents also apprehended one male subject who was found in a vehicle parked near the trailer.

The subject, trailer, and contraband were turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Wednesday, December 23, 2009

Spring 2010 Rural Law Enforcement Technology Institute, May 2-7, 2010, Coronado (San Diego), Calif.

Application Deadline: February 1, 2010

Description:
For the eighth year, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is sponsoring a Rural Law Enforcement Technology Institute. This technology institute will be held May 2-7, 2010, in Coronado (San Diego), Calif., and is targeted/designed for the command staff/supervisory personnel of rural and small law enforcement agencies containing fewer than 50 sworn officers. Law enforcement personnel will learn about and discuss technology initiatives and issues affecting the rural and small law enforcement community. Participants will receive information and assistance on existing and developing technologies, work through problems relating to technology implementation, and exchange technology lessons learned that are important to the rural and small law enforcement community.

As part of the program, participants are required to give a brief (no more than 15 minutes) PowerPoint presentation on a technology issue that their department has encountered or is in the process of implementing (e.g., implementation of a crime mapping program, new communications system or automated booking station). The presentation can be either an issues to be dealt with or a lessons-learned format, depending on whether the program has been completed, and must be submitted on CD-ROM with the application.

There is no registration cost and all travel, food and lodging expenses are paid. However, only 35 individuals will be selected to attend. Previous attendees of the NIJ Rural Law Enforcement Technology Institute or the NIJ Technology Institutes for Law Enforcement or Corrections are not eligible to attend.

For a copy of the application form go to:
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/training/rural-institute.htm

The deadline for submitting an application is February 1, 2010. Applications not received by that date and/or applications submitted without a CD-ROM containing the PowerPoint presentation will not be considered. The application and PowerPoint CD-ROM should be mailed to the following address:

Rural Law Enforcement Technology Center
ATTN: Rural LE Tech Institute
101 Bulldog Lane
Hazard, KY 41701
For additional information, please contact Scott Barker, Deputy Director-Rural Law Enforcement Technology Center, at (866) 787-2553 or e-mail ruletc1@aol.com

Border Patrol Agents Seize Cash, Cocaine in Blythe

December 23, 2009: U.S. Border Patrol agents from the Blythe Station seized more than $80,000 in cash and two pounds of cocaine in separate smuggling attempts over the weekend. On December 18, Border Patrol agents arrested two individuals traveling in a 2008 Gray Chrysler 300. During the vehicle stop, a K-9 team alerted to the vehicle. A search of the trunk yielded several bundles of U.S. currency totaling $82,075. The money was turned over to the Blythe Narcotics Enforcement Team and the two individuals were released pending an investigation.

The next day, agents arrested two more individuals traveling in a 2001 Gold Chevrolet Impala. A K-9 team responded to the vehicle stop and quickly alerted to the vehicle. Agents searched the vehicle and found a plastic wrapped bundle of cocaine in the speaker box. The cocaine weighs a little more than two pounds and has an estimated street value of $74,720. The cocaine and suspects were turned over to the Narcotics Task Force Office of Palm Springs.  Since October 1, 2009, the Blythe Border Patrol Station has seized approximately $235,000 in cash.

CBP Seizes $3.2 Million Worth of Belts with Counterfeit Design



December 22, 2009: U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials at Los Angeles/Long Beach seaport complex seized 11,676 belts displaying a counterfeit Burberry design. The belts have an appraised domestic value of $23,954. Had the items been legitimate the value would have been over $3.2 million. On December 18, CBP officials seized the belts for infringing on the Burberry pattern trademark. The shipment arrived from China and the final destination was the state of New Jersey. CBP officers and import specialists work closely with trademark and copyright owners to identify counterfeit and pirated products.

In this case, the Burberry design looked authentic, but the import specialist conducting the inspection was not deceived and forwarded the images to representatives of Burberry LTD to authenticate. Burberry representatives confirmed the belts were not branded to Burberry’s specifications and CBP concluded the design to be counterfeit.

“CBP maintains a very aggressive program to intercept shipments containing commodities which violate any trade laws of the United States,” said Kevin Weeks, director of CBP Los Angeles Field Operations. CBP officers and import specialists in cooperation with other law enforcement agencies and the trade community are working together to reduce the importation of counterfeit products.

The items have been seized and following the normal forfeiture procedures, the belts will be destroyed if they are forfeited to the government.

Tuesday, December 22, 2009

Mastermind of ‘La Tómbola,’ Massacre in Toa Baja

Alexis Candelario Arrested on Armed Career Criminal Charges Alleged Mastermind of ‘La Tómbola,’ Massacre in Toa Baja, P.R.


December 16, 2009: On November 10, a sealed complaint against Alexis Candelario Santana was authorized by U.S. Magistrate Judge Justo Arenas charging federal firearms violations under Title 18, United States Code, Sections 922(g)(1) and (924)(e). Last night Candelario Santana was arrested by Customs and Border Protection agents in Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. The announcement of the arrest was made today by Rosa Emilia Rodríguez-Vélez, United States Attorney for the District of Puerto Rico, along with federal and state law enforcement agents.

Candelario Santana is the alleged mastermind of the massacre which occurred on October 17, 2009, in the business establishment known as “La Tómbola” in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, where eight people were killed and 20 injured.

“The arrest of Candelario Santana is the result of the joint efforts of a task force of federal and state prosecutors and law enforcement agents who worked tirelessly to locate and capture him. We will continue working with our state and federal law enforcement partners to conclude the ongoing investigation into the events of October 17,” said U.S. Attorney Rosa Emilia Rodriguez-Vélez.

This arrest was part of the joint efforts of the FBI, DEA, Puerto Rico Police Department, ATF, ICE, the U.S. Marshals Service and the Puerto Rico Department of Justice.

"Thanks to our continuous collaboration with federal, state and local partners we are able to protect the U.S. borders from criminals, while facilitating legal trade and travel". Miguel Isaac, director of Marine Operations for CBP. Penalties for the firearms offenses alleged in the complaint range from 15 years to life imprisonment, and fines up to $250,000.

The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Jose A. Contreras, of the Violent Crimes Unit. The investigation into Candelario Santana’s criminal activities is ongoing.

CBP Officers Seize More than 600 Ecstasy Pills at Brownsville Port of Entry

December 21, 2009: U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Brownsville and Matamoros International Bridge discovered $12,400 in Ecstasy concealed under the clothing of a male body carrier; one U.S. citizen was arrested. On December 19, CBP officers at the Brownsville and Matamoros International Bridge referred a pedestrian for secondary inspection. At secondary the man was identified as Oscar Javier Rodea, a 23-year-old U.S. citizen from Brownsville, Texas. CBP officers’ examination of the male’s clothing and person resulted in the discovery that the male had a package containing a total of 620 pills of Ecstasy hidden under his clothing.

The Ecstasy, also known as methylenedioxymethamphetamine or MDMA, in this enforcement action has an estimated street value of $12,400. Oscar Javier Rodea was arrested by CBP officers and turned over to the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement special agents who continue to investigate the seizure. After thorough review of the case, the pedestrian was processed by the Cameron County District Attorney’s Office on state drug charges.

“CBP officers working the primary inspection area maintained their alertness and applied their experience and inspection skills which greatly contributed to the interception of this load of narcotics. The continued training our officers receive has had outstanding result with this seizure of hundreds of Ecstasy pills,” said Michael Freeman, CBP port director, Brownsville.

CBP Officers Seize Cocaine Found Hidden in Commercial Bus, Marijuana in Spare Tire – Drugs Valued at $5.1 Million



December 22, 2009: U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers working at the Hidalgo/Pharr, Texas port of entry seized approximately 158 pounds of cocaine and 41 pounds of marijuana in two separate, unrelated enforcement actions this weekend. The combined estimated street value of drugs seized is close to $5.1 million.

On December 18, CBP officers working at the Hidalgo/Reynosa International Bridge came in contact with a northbound 1995 Dina passenger bus. The driver of the bus was identified as a 37-year-old male U.S. citizen from Houston, Texas. After the initial primary inspection, the driver and bus were referred to secondary for further inspection.

While in secondary, “Laika”, a narcotic detector dog, alerted officers to the odor of narcotics emanating from the bus. A non-intrusive image scan revealed anomalies within the bus’s floor. While conducting an intensive examination of the undercarriage, CBP officers found 62 cocaine packages hidden within the bus’s floor. The driver, who was not immediately arrested, was issued at $10,000 civil penalty. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement special agents continue to investigate this failed smuggling attempt. CBP officers seized the 1995 Dina bus. Packages of cocaine are found in a commercial bus.

On December 20, CBP officers working at the Pharr/Reynosa International Bridge came in contact with a northbound 1996 Toyota Tacoma pickup truck. The driver was identified as Adrian Gomez, a U.S. citizen, age 20 from Pharr, Texas. A CBP officer referred the driver and pickup truck to secondary for further inspection. In secondary, officers noted discrepancies to the vehicle’s spare tire and had the tire dismantled. CBP officers discovered within the spare tire a metal container full of bulk compressed marijuana.

The marijuana weighed approximately 41 pounds and the estimated street value was close to $32,000. After his arrest, Gomez was transferred to the custody of ICE special agents who continue to investigate this failed smuggling attempt. Pending appearance before a U.S. Magistrate, Gomez remains incarcerated. CBP officers seized the Tacoma pickup truck.

Hector A. Mancha, CBP port director Hidalgo said, “I commend our frontline officers and K-9 units for their vigilance and for intercepting these two drug loads.” Mancha further said, “K-9 Laika continues to do great work in alerting to the presence of narcotic odors.”

Friday, December 18, 2009

CBP in Charleston Intercepts Counterfeit Shirts

December 18, 2009: Charleston, S.C. — U.S. Customs and Border Protection at the Port of Charleston seized 701 cartons of counterfeit “Gap” and “Faded Glory” polo shirts, along with other commingled merchandise on December 3, officials announced today. The shipment had a total domestic value of $28,129 and a manufacturers suggested retail price of $415,306.

CBP officers discovered the shipment of counterfeit merchandise in a container that was selected for examination. A total of 10,842 boy’s polo shirts bearing the Gap logo and 8,014 men’s polo shirts bearing the Faded Glory logo were seized.

“CBP has a lead role in protecting both the American consumer and domestic businesses,” said Robert A. Fencel, area port director in Charleston. “This seizure is an excellent example of the steps CBP has taken in the area of enforcing IPR laws. We will continue to educate our officers and work with our stakeholders in the trade community to continue these efforts to combat the importation of illegitimate trade items."

P has designated intellectual property rights enforcement as a Priority Trade Issue. Our strategic approach to IPR enforcement is multi-layered and includes seizing fake goods at our borders, pushing the border outward through audits of infringing importers and cooperation with our international trading partners, and partnering with industry and other government agencies to enhance these efforts. CBP devotes considerable resources and diverse personnel to the enforcement of IPR.

For more information on intellectual property rights dealing with trademarks, please go to the CBP Web site.

Thursday, December 17, 2009

Unconventional Delivery of Deadly Force in a Correctional Facility

On January 21, 2010, Conversations with American Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion with corrections official Tracy E. Barnhart on the Unconventional Delivery of Deadly Force in a Correctional Facility

Program Date: January 21, 2010
Program Time: 1710 hours, Pacific
Topic: Unconventional Delivery of Deadly Force in a Correctional Facility
Listen Live: www.americanheroesradio.com/unconventional_delivery_deadly_force.html

About the Guest
After completion of a Marine Corps combat tour of duty in Iraq in 1991, Tracy E. Barnhart completed the National Registry requirements as an Emergency Medical Technician. He responded to calls of emergency medical nature for over three years until he became a police officer for the City of Galion (Ohio). After three years on patrol he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant. Later leaving the City of Galion Tracy E. Barnhart was hired as the Chief of Police for the City of Edison (Ohio). After 3 years as chief of police, and with a total of ten years experience in law enforcement he changed careers leaping into the realm of corrections where he is currently employed at the Marion Juvenile Correctional Facility.

Tracy E. Barnhart is the Law Enforcement coordinator the Tri-Rivers Public Safety Adult Education where he designs and coordinates continuing educational courses for law enforcement and correctional officers. He has established courses on verbal de-escalation, criminal behavior analysis, use of force, and ground fighting and take down techniques for law enforcement.

About the Subject
Tracy E. Barnhart & co-author Gary T. Klugiewicz wrote an article on Unconventional Delivery of Deadly Force in a Correctional Facility which appeared in the December 2009 issue of the American Heroes Press Newsletter. The article began, “We wanted to write an article on a topic that you might have thought that you never would read about in print. This article is going to discuss how and when to use deadly force in a correctional facility and most importantly how to defend your actions. Since most corrections officers are not trained or equipped with weapons designed to deliver deadly force the techniques we are going to discuss will need to be unconventional. The following information is the kind of stuff we talk about before roll call when we hear about an assault on an officer from the previous shift. This type of violent assault against a corrections officer could happen anywhere. It could even happen in your facility. These life threatening assaults could happen to a friend or someone who you went to the academy with or it could happen to you. Hopefully it’s doesn’t end up like the incident referenced below with an officer being killed.”

The entire article can be found at:
http://www.police-writers.com/articles/unconvential_delivery_deadly_force.html

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in Law Enforcement, public policy, Public Safety Technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in Law Enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
www.americanheroesradio.com/unconventional_delivery_deadly_force.html
Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Memorial Services to be Held for Recently Slain CBP Officer Funds Established for Surviving Children

December 16, 2009: Memorial Services for recently slain U.S. Customs and Border Protection Officer Maribel Arteaga will take place on Saturday, December 19, at 10 a.m. at the Holy Trinity Church located at 405 Ballard Street, El Cajon, Calif., 92019. A public viewing will take place on Friday, December 18, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Humphrey’s Mortuary located at 753 Broadway, Chula Vista, Calif., 91910. A rosary will also take place at this location at 7 p.m.

All services are closed to members of the media.

Savings accounts have been established to provide support for CBP Officer Arteaga’s two surviving children, ages 4 and 6, at Cabrillo Credit Union; individuals may reference account number 192541. For more information, interested parties may wish to contact Tyree Davis, Branch Manager, at 858-547-7400 ext. 540 or visit their Web site.

CBP Officers Seize Marijuana Concealed on Body of Teenager



December 17, 2009: U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers stopped a drug smuggling attempt when they apprehended a 15-year-old boy trying to smuggle marijuana taped to his body.

On December 16 at about 7:30a.m., CBP officers were screening travelers when they observed a 15-year-old boy wearing a bulky coat. The boy was identified as a U.S. citizen and a student at the Douglas High School.

The CBP officers searched the boy and found that he had a package of marijuana taped to his lower back and another package taped to his thigh. The marijuana weighed about 1.5 pounds and had an estimated street value of more than $2,000.

CBP officers seized the marijuana. CBP officers held the boy for questioning. The boy was released to the custody of his father.

Latest scams camouflaged as military calls for assistance

December 17, 2009: The latest attempts to part innocent persons from their money or sensitive information, just in time for the holidays, could be called "Operation Desert Scam." One recent scheme strikes close to home, as a scam artist used the name and other personal information of a deployed Wisconsin Army National Guard Soldier, obtained from a news article, to attempt to sell a vehicle on-line to a potential buyer in Oklahoma. The potential buyer became suspicious and reported the incident to the Wisconsin National Guard.

Maj. Joseph Adamson, provost marshal for the Wisconsin National Guard, said that to date, the Soldier in question has not suffered financial loss as a result of the scam attempt.

According to Adamson, the scammer obtained only limited personal identification information from the news article.


"There are no steadfast ways to protect against [identity theft resulting from scammers reading] properly vetted and released news articles," he warned, adding that the best protection was vigilance - monitoring personal finances, investigating unexpected charges, contacting all three credit report agencies if necessary, and filing a police report immediately if identity theft is suspected.

"It takes time to recover from a bona fide identity theft where there is a loss to the victim," Adamson explained. "And in some cases it can cost the victim money to recover from the negative impact of being an identity theft victim."

Adamson said there are no confirmed cases of Wisconsin National Guard members suffering actual losses from identity theft. Guard families, however, have been victimized, he said. In some cases, the scam artist will call someone from the Guard member's extended family - a grandparent, for example - seeking money on behalf of the Guard member for some type of emergency.

"[Scammers] manipulate a sense of urgency," Adamson said. He urged anyone receiving this type of surprise contact to verify the information - phone numbers for the hospital or police station, the police report file number, exact time and location of the alleged incident - and also recommended contacting someone who can verify that the relative may be in the location the caller claims.

"Very seldom will a relative get a [legitimate] call from a stranger about an injured family member," he said.

Another scheme has been around for some time and bears striking similarities to the "Nigerian prince" scams of the 1990s. This particular scam claims that a handful of U.S. Marines have discovered millions in cash in the mansion of a militant leader in Iraq and need your help to bring the money back to the states.

"This is a very serious deal and I wouldn't be asking for your help if I am not convinced that this is not going to bring any harm to you or your family, or put you in a risky position," states the author of the scam, allegedly a Marine named Williams Barnes. The reader is asked to provide their full name, mailing address and private telephone number, and advised to wait for further instructions.

Adamson said the lure of easy money, along with the belief that responding could aid a service member, blinds some people to warning signs of a scam known as a "confidence swindle."

"They fall into a downward spiral," he explained. "It's 'what am I going to lose by doing this?' That's the first part of the process. Next, [the scammers] will ask for your birthday, or your account number. It's a way of getting the victims invested."

"I hope I can rely on your sense of discretion," the alleged Marine writes. "If for some reasons you don't want to or can't help us, I want you to delete this message immediately and assume we never had this conversation."

The state Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection's Bureau of Consumer Protection encourages anyone who receives such offers to ask themselves two questions: Why would a perfect stranger pick you to share a fortune with, and why would you share personal or business information with a perfect stranger?

"If it sounds too good to be true," Adamson said, "then it is too good to be true."

The provost marshal's office serves the members of the Wisconsin National Guard and their families, and is a conduit between victims and law enforcement. The provost marshal's office does not complete identity theft reports, but does work with Guard members and their families to get that information to the correct law enforcement agency.

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

CBP Officers in Buffalo Stop Bird Smuggling Attempt

December 16, 2009: U.S. Customs and Border Protection Field Operations announced the seizure of five birds which were being smuggled into the United States by a United States citizen.

On December 15, CBP officers encountered a 41-year-old United States citizen and resident of Oceanside, N.Y., as he applied for admission into the United States at the Peace Bridge border crossing in Buffalo, N.Y. The subject advised CBP officers that he was returning from a one day trip visiting friends in Toronto and had nothing to declare. During initial questioning, the subject aroused the suspicion of CBP officers, and was subsequently referred for an enforcement exam.

During the course of the secondary inspection, the subject recanted his initial declaration and advised CBP officers that he was in possession of five birds concealed in his vehicle. CBP officers conducted an inspection of the vehicle and discovered five live canaries contained in a wooden box behind the passenger seat.

Agents from Immigration and Custom Enforcement and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service assisted CBP officers and agriculture specialists in the initial investigation of the smuggling case. The interview revealed that the subject is a collector of birds, allegedly having more than 200 as pets at his home in Oceanside. He admitted that his sole purpose for traveling to Canada was to acquire the birds and that he knew it was illegal to import birds without proper documentation and the required USDA veterinary exam, but did so because they were cheaper in Canada.

The undeclared birds were seized by CBP and transferred to the custody of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Division of Veterinary Services.

“A monetary penalty of $300.00 was assessed and the case was referred to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and USDA Investigative and Enforcement Services for further action and possible criminal prosecution," said Kevin Corsaro, CBP public affairs liaison for the Buffalo Field Office. "The smuggling of such birds increases the chances that a communicable bird disease, such as Exotic Newcastle or Avian Influenza, could enter the United States. CBP officers and agricultures specialists continue to execute their responsibilities which include protecting the United States food crops and livestock from agricultural pests and diseases."

CBP Officers Seize Crystal Meth Valued at $270,000, Arrest Laredo Man

December 16, 2009:Laredo, Texas – U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Laredo port of entry seized nearly 18 pounds of crystal methamphetamines Monday in an enforcement action that resulted in the arrest of a Laredo man.

CBP officers arrested a 27-year-old male U.S. citizen from Laredo, Texas and turned him over to the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents after CBP officers discovered nearly 18 pounds of crystal methamphetamine hidden inside a spare tire.

The seizure occurred Monday, December 14 at the Lincoln-Juarez International Bridge. A CBP officer referred a 1998 Dodge Caravan for a secondary examination. During the examination, a CBP officer noted discrepancies in the spare tire area. A CBP narcotics detection dog, “Hank,” alerted to the odor of narcotics emanating from the same area. CBP officers conducted an X-ray examination of the spare tire that resulted in the discovery of five bundles containing nearly 18 pounds of crystal meth with an estimated street value of $270,000.

CBP officers seized the crystal meth and the vehicle. ICE agents investigated the seizure and processed the driver on federal drug charges.

“Even though this is the season when we experience an upsurge in traffic, our CBP officers remain vigilant and capable of intercepting significant narcotics loads such as this one,” said Gene Garza, port director, Laredo, Texas.

Juvenile Arrests 2008

Summarizes 2008 juvenile crime and arrest data reported by local law enforcement agencies across the country and cited in the FBI report Crime in the United States 2008. Overall, there were 3 percent fewer juvenile arrests in 2008 than in 2007 and juvenile violent crime arrests fell 2 percent, continuing a recent decline. One area that merits continued attention is the persistently disproportionate rate of minority contact with the juvenile justice system. The arrest rate for robbery in 2008, for example, was 10 times higher for black youth than for white youth.

More Information
http://www.ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/publications/PubAbstract.asp?pubi=250498

Associate Chair of Criminal Justice

I am interested in serving as an online instructor for any type of criminal justice program. The contact address is: Barry.Goodson@columbiasouthern.edu

Thanks

7 Marijuana Seizures, Confiscate Thousands of Dollars

December 14, 2009: U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers working at ports of entry along the California border with Mexico over the weekend made 17 marijuana seizures valued at $558,000, confiscated $46,434 on its way southbound into Mexico, and stopped 243 illegal aliens from entering the country.

The enforcement actions occurred from 6 a.m. on Friday through 6 a.m. on Monday.

The largest marijuana seizure occurred on Friday, December 11 at the Otay Mesa cargo facility when a 39-year-old Tijuana man driving a supposedly empty 1995 Freightliner Tractor entered the port for inspection. A CBP officer and his detector dog were screening conveyances and when the dog alerted to the tractor. The driver and tractor were sent for a more an in-depth examination.

Officers subsequently discovered compartments within both fuel tanks and extracted 10 wrapped packages of marijuana weighing 232 pounds. The driver was arrested and transported to San Diego County jail. CBP seized the vehicle and narcotics.

At the Andrade port of entry on Saturday, December 12, at about 9 a.m. a CBP officer encountered a 39-year-old male U.S. citizen driving a 1991 Toyota pick-up truck. During the course of the inspection, the officer noticed discrepancies with the driver’s answers and referred him and the truck for further investigation.

An intensive inspection of the truck, which included a canine screening, led officers to the discovery of 73 wrapped packages of the narcotic concealed inside the bed of the pick-up truck.

The driver, a resident of Yuma, Ariz., was arrested for the alleged narcotic smuggling attempt and turned over to the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents for further processing. CBP seized both the vehicle and narcotics.

In five of this weekend’s 17 marijuana seizures, officers discovered marijuana strapped to the bodies of individuals entering the country as pedestrians.

Officers with the San Ysidro port of entry conducting outbound inspections on the I-5 freeway made two currency seizures equaling $46,434.

The largest currency seizure occurred on Sunday afternoon at about 1:30 p.m. when the ports Anti-Terrorism Contraband Enforcement Team was conducting southbound inspections and stopped a 30-year-old U.S. citizen from Compton, Calif., driving a 2003 Suzuki motorcycle.

The man claimed he did not have any currency on him, but a subsequent search of his person and the motorcycle revealed $9,642 in his inside jacket pocket and left front pant pocket. An additional $20,000 was found on the Suzuki underneath the seat on top of the battery compartment.

He was arrested and transported to the Metropolitan Correctional Center by ICE agents. CBP seized the money and motorcycle.

On Saturday afternoon at 1 p.m., A-TCET officers also seized $16,792 in U.S. dollars and Mexican pesos from a 32-year-old Tijuana man driving a 2007 Gold Chevy Malibu on his way into Mexico on the I-5 freeway.

Officers at ports of entry in San Diego and the Imperial Valley also intercepted 243 violators of immigration law that included cases of illegal aliens hidden in vehicles, aliens who presented fraudulent documents and those who presented valid documents not legally issued to them.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the unified border agency within the Department of Homeland Security charged with the management, control and protection of our nation's borders at and between the official ports of entry. CBP is charged with keeping terrorists and terrorist weapons out of the country while enforcing hundreds of U.S. laws.

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

CBP Officers Seize $300,000 in Undeclared Currency at Arizona Border

December 15, 2009: Nogales, Arizona - U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers working at the Mariposa, Ariz. port of entry yesterday discovered $300,032 in undeclared currency hidden inside a suitcase and arrested two men from Sonora, Mexico.

On Monday afternoon, CBP officers were conducting routine inspections of vehicles leaving the United States when they selected a 1994 Chevy pick-up truck for inspection. The truck was occupied by two Mexican men, ages 19 and 46.

While conducting their inspection, CBP officers opened a suitcase that was inside the truck and discovered 30 packages wrapped in black electrical tape. After a CBP Currency/Weapons Detector Dog alerted to the suitcase, officers removed the packages and seized $300,032 as undeclared currency.

Both occupants of the truck were arrested and turned over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement for further investigation.

Crime Mapping

On January 28, 2010, Conversations with American Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion with Michael R. King on Crime Mapping.

Program Date: January 28, 2010
Program Time: 1700 Hours Pacific
Topic: Crime Mapping
Listen Live:
www.americanheroesradio.com/crime_mapping.html

About the Guest
Michael R. King is a National Law Enforcement Account Manager for ESRI, the Environmental Systems Research Institute, a worldwide leader of GIS software. He was a Product Planning Manager for Motorola, Inc. from 2004-2006. In 2004, Michael R. King retired from full-time Law Enforcement and has over 28 years of service. He began his law enforcement career in 1979. After 8 years of experience with the Ogden Utah Police Department, Michael R. King became the Chief of Staff for Weber County Attorney, Reed M. Richards. He served in that capacity and as lead investigator for 8 years.

In 1993,
Michael R. King became an investigator with the Utah Attorney General’s Office where he investigated sexual offenses, cult activity and white-collar crimes. He was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant and eventually promoted to Chief of Staff under Attorney General Jan Graham. During this time, King was trained as a criminal profiler through the FBI. He served as the co-chair of the FBI’s Violent Criminal Apprehension Program National Board. Michael R. King has consulted on hundreds of complex criminal cases around the world.

Michael R. King has a Master of Criminal Justice Degree and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Criminal Justice. He is an adjunct faculty member for the school of Criminal Justice at Salt Lake Community College and Weber State University. He is a member of the Harvard Medical School Program in Psychiatry and the Law (2003-present) and is a Visiting Scholar for the School of Nursing at Boston College (2005-present).

Mike has authored, in part or whole, a number of books, including: Analyzing Criminal Behavior; Cold Case Methodology; and, Predators: Who They are and How to Stop Them.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
Police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. American Heroes Radio brings you to the watering hole, where it is Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in Law Enforcement, public policy, Public Safety Technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in Law Enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Crime Lab Casts Net Ahead of Cyber Criminals

By Judith Snyderman
Special to American Forces Press Service

Dec. 15, 2009 - Public fascination with television's "CSI" forensic detectives and with the virtual reality depicted in the "Matrix" films may be partly responsible for the high level of interest garnered by a Defense Department contest to solve cyber crimes. The Digital Forensics Challenge was created by Jim Christy, director of future exploration at the Defense Department Cyber Crime Center, better known as DC3.

"We had 1,153 teams play from 61 different countries [in this year's contest], so it was kind of amazing," Christy said in a Dec. 9 "Armed with Science: Research and Applications for the Modern Military" podcast interview.

Though contestants work on invented puzzles, researchers harvest real crime-solving tools from their efforts. Those tools can help them stay ahead of criminal activity ranging from hacking to espionage to child pornography.

Christy is a veteran in the field of solving digital crimes. In 1986, at the dawn of the digital age, he cracked his first major case.

"We had five hackers from West Germany that were working for the Soviet KGB and hacking [Defense Department] systems," he said. Christy soon realized the emergence of a new risk associated with storing information on computers instead of on discrete pieces of paper tucked away in file cabinets. "Unclassified information in aggregation can have an impact on national security," he said.

Today, he said, virtually every aspect of every crime has a digital component.

"Everybody has a PDA, everybody has a smartphone, everybody has a GPS device, and I don't know too many people who don't have a computer in their office and a computer in their house," Christy said.

Four years ago, the DC3 was receiving broken CDs from Afghanistan and Iraq. Since they didn't have the tools to recover data from the disk fragments and were short on resources, Christy started the digital challenge to cast a wide net for solutions.

"When people registered, we'd send them a broken CD knowing what was on it, and 11 teens actually came back that first year with a solution," Christy said.

This year's challenge was more difficult because entrants were not told exactly what they were looking for, said Curt Barnard, a cyber operations graduate student at the Air Force Institute of Technology. Bernard is part of a civilian cyber corps fellowship program connected to the National Science Foundation, and he's a member of the team that recently won the 2009 Digital Forensics Challenge.

"They gave us a hard-drive image and told us to look for evidence regarding a crime," Barnard said. He said it took a standard forensics tool kit plus free programs and some original computer programming scripts written by team members to complete the analysis and decipher hidden information.

DC3 ran this year's contest in partnership with the SANS Institute, a high-tech security firm, and a cyber crime group called IMPACT. Bernard and his teammates won a trip to DC3's upcoming cyber crime conference that starts Jan. 22 in St. Louis.

But the real reward may come after DC3 completes testing the investigative methods developed by a number of teams in the competition.

"Part of forensics is to be accurate, repeatable, and predictable," Christy said. "So everything has to be really documented well so that another forensic examiner can pick up your report and come to the same conclusion, with the same evidence."

DC3 shares its new discoveries and tools that are proven to work with the law-enforcement and digital-forensics communities. After more than two decades solving cyber crime, Christy said, he's learned never to become complacent.

"If you don't like change, you don't want to be in this environment," he said. "You always have to strive to look at the next threat that's coming down the pike -- what is the next vulnerability that's coming down the pike, and how do we address it? Because, unfortunately, we don't solve cases like they do on television, in 15 minutes."

(Judith Snyderman works in the Defense Media Activity's emerging media directorate.)

Treasury Designates Sinaloa Cartel Members Under the Kingpin Act

The U.S. Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) today designated two Mexican nationals and one Colombian national as Specially Designated Narcotics Traffickers (SDNTs) for providing material support to the drug trafficking activities of the Sinaloa Cartel. OFAC also today designated two Mexican companies and two Colombian companies as SDNTs. Today's action, pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (Kingpin Act), prohibits U.S. persons from conducting financial or commercial transactions with these entities and individuals and freezes any assets the designees may have under U.S. jurisdiction.

The Sinaloa Cartel, a powerful and violent Mexican drug trafficking organization identified by the President pursuant to the Kingpin Act in April 2009, is led by Joaquin Guzman Loera (a.k.a. "El Chapo"), Ismael Zambada Garcia (a.k.a. "El Mayo"), and Ignacio Coronel Villareal (a.k.a. "Nacho"), all previously identified by the President as Significant Foreign Narcotics Traffickers pursuant to the Kingpin Act.

"Today's action builds on the President's identification of the Sinaloa Cartel in April and OFAC's commitment to working with our partners in Mexico to disrupt and deter the illicit activities of this dangerous organization," said OFAC Director Adam J. Szubin. "We will continue to aggressively track and expose those who support the Sinaloa Cartel in Mexico, Colombia and elsewhere."

Mexican nationals Agustin Reyes Garza (a.k.a. "Don Pilo") and Hector Contreras Novoa were designated today due to their material support to the drug trafficking activities of the Sinaloa Cartel. Reyes Garza, a fugitive from Honduran drug trafficking charges, owns or controls two businesses identified in today's action, Estetic Carr de Occidente S.A. de C.V. and Estetica Car Wash S.A. de C.V., located in Zapopan, Jalisco, Mexico. Contreras Novoa was indicted in 2005 on cocaine conspiracy charges filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. Both individuals operate from Guadalajara, Mexico.

Colombian national Nestor Alonso Tarazona Enciso was designated today due to his material support to the drug trafficking activities of the Sinaloa Cartel. Tarazona Enciso owns or controls Agropecuaria La Cruz S.A. and Criadero Las Cabanas Ltda., two livestock companies registered in Bogota, Colombia that were also designated today. Tarazona Enciso was convicted on federal cocaine trafficking charges and served a prison sentence in the United States. After completing his sentence in 1995 and returning to Colombia, Tarazona Enciso once again became involved in drug trafficking activities. He operates from San Martin, Meta, Colombia.

This action is part of ongoing efforts under the Kingpin Act to apply financial measures against significant foreign narcotics traffickers worldwide. Internationally, more than 500 businesses and individuals associated with 82 drug kingpins have been designated pursuant to the Kingpin Act since June 2000, 37 of which are based in Mexico. Penalties for violations of the Kingpin Act range from civil penalties of up to $1.075 million per violation to more severe criminal penalties. Criminal penalties for corporate officers may include up to 30 years in prison and fines up to $5 million. Criminal fines for corporations may reach $10 million. Other individuals face up to 10 years in prison and fines pursuant to Title 18 of the United States Code for criminal violations of the Kingpin Act

Monday, December 14, 2009

Border Patrol Seizes More than 15,000 Pounds of Marijuana in Single Day

December 11, 2009: The U.S. Border Patrol of the Rio Grande Valley Sector seized 15,662 pounds of marijuana in multiple unrelated seizures throughout South Texas in a 24-hour period.

These seizures took place at the checkpoints as well as stations along the Rio Grande. The seizures ranged in quantity from 775 pounds to more than 5,000 pounds. All narcotics and suspects were turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration for further investigation.

To report suspicious activity, contact the Rio Grande Valley Border Patrol Sector’s toll-free telephone number at 800-863-9382.

Friday, December 11, 2009

Border Patrol Agent's Instinct Leads to Marijuana Seizure

December 11, 2009: Border Patrol agents arrested a U.S. citizen attempting to smuggle marijuana through the immigration checkpoint on Interstate 8 late Tuesday evening.

At about 5:30 p.m., agents assigned to the Interstate 8 checkpoint near Dateland encountered a 1998 Ford sport utility vehicle driven by a young male.

As the driver pulled up to the checkpoint’s primary inspection lane, agents noticed that the driver was acting in a manner inconsistent with normal traffic. After observing several suspicious behaviors, agents referred the driver and vehicle to secondary inspection.

Once in secondary inspection, a K-9 team performed a cursory inspection of the vehicle. The inspection produced an alert by the K-9 team indicating the possibility of hidden persons or contraband located within the vehicle. The K-9 team led agents to the spare tire located underneath the SUV. Agents inspected the spare tire and noticed that the tire was too small to support the large SUV.

A closer examination of the tire by agents revealed seven plastic-wrapped bundles of marijuana. Agents arrested the 19-year-old driver and seized 26.9 pounds of marijuana with an estimated street value of $21,520. Border Patrol agents turned the driver and marijuana over to the Yuma County Narcotics Task Force.

The Border Patrol’s strategy to secure U.S. borders is based on a “defense in depth” philosophy. This includes the use of interior checkpoints to interdict terrorists, illegal narcotics and illegal aliens attempting to egress away from the border area into the interior portions of our country. Border Patrol immigration checkpoints are within the constraints of the Constitution and have been upheld numerous times by the U.S. Supreme Court. Immigration checkpoints are a valuable tool to secure our borders and have helped agents across the country stop dangerous smugglers of humans and narcotics.

Border Patrol Halts 500 Pounds of Marijuana at Checkpoint

December 10, 2009: Border Patrol agents from the Indio, Calif. station working the Highway 111 checkpoint seized approximately 500 pounds of marijuana with an estimated value of more than $400,000. A truck entered the Highway 111 checkpoint on Wednesday for inspection. During the inspection, a Border Patrol canine team alerted to the cargo box of the truck and the vehicle and was referred for further inspection.

A physical search of the cargo area revealed a discrepancy between the front interior and exterior walls. Indio Station agents discovered approximately 80 bundles of marijuana within a non-factory compartment. The marijuana weighs approximately 500 pounds and has an estimated value of more than $400,000. The driver, the vehicle and marijuana were turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Thursday, December 10, 2009

National Youth Gang Survey Analysis

Since 1996, the National Youth Gang Center (NYGC) has conducted an annual survey of law enforcement agencies to assess the extent of gang problems by measuring the presence, characteristics, and behaviors of local gangs in jurisdictions throughout the United States. The National Youth Gang Survey (NYGS) is based on a nationally representative sample of law enforcement agencies serving larger cities, suburban counties, smaller cities, and rural counties. This Web resource contains analysis and findings from the ongoing National Youth Gang Surveys. Numerous charts and descriptions are provided as a resource for understanding gang problems.

http://www.nationalgangcenter.gov/Survey-Analysis

Attention to Duty: What Separates the Good Cops from the Status Quo

By Andrew G. Hawkes

Yesterday I was reminded one thing. That no matter how routine you think this job is on a daily basis you just can’t think that way. I’m a sergeant, with seniority, so with that seniority comes my pick of the day, evening, or graveyard shifts. After nearly 20 years on the job I’m taking the day shift, thank you very much. But with the day shift comes supervising mostly veteran cops. Veteran cops that have seen a lot, been through a lot, and quite frankly want to do very little.

Read On
http://www.police-writers.com/articles/attention_to_duty.html

Unconventional Delivery of Deadly Force in a Correctional Facility

By Tracy E. Barnhart & Gary T. Klugiewicz

We wanted to write an article on a topic that you might have thought that you never would read about in print. This article is going to discuss how and when to use deadly force in a correctional facility and most importantly how to defend your actions. Since most corrections officers are not trained or equipped with weapons designed to deliver deadly force the techniques we are going to discuss will need to be unconventional. The following information is the kind of stuff we talk about before roll call when we hear about an assault on an officer from the previous shift. This type of violent assault against a corrections officer could happen anywhere. It could even happen in your facility. These life threatening assaults could happen to a friend or someone who you went to the academy with or it could happen to you. Hopefully it’s doesn’t end up like the incident referenced below with an officer being killed.

READ ON
http://www.police-writers.com/articles/unconvential_delivery_deadly_force.html

My Supervisor is an Idiot

There are plenty of books and articles on being a good leader and being a good follower. Indeed, excellent followership starts with leadership. Moreover, there are a lot of good books because there a lot of people who need leadership training and mentoring. But, what do you do when your supervisor is an idiot? Here are ten tips:

www.pokerleadership.com/supervisor_idiot.html

CBP Officers Seize $1.4 Million Worth of Cocaine

Thursday, December 10, 2009: U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers enforcement efforts resulted in the seizure of more than 55 pounds of Cocaine and the arrest of a 40-year-old man just yesterday. On December 9, CBP officers while processing travelers and conducting routine inspections encountered the U.S. citizen and escorted him to the secondary lot for further inspection. During the inspection process cocaine packages were found inside the gas tank of the Isuzu Rodeo he was driving after it was x-rayed and weighed more than 55 pounds. The man was immediately arrested and turned over to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement for further investigation.

New CBP San Ysidro Port Director Sworn in During Change of Command Ceremony

Will Oversee all Passenger Processing Operations at San Ysidro, Otay Mesa Ports of Entry

Wednesday, December 09, 2009: Christopher D. Maston, a career federal law enforcement officer with more than 24 years experience managing the processing of international travelers and trade, was formally sworn into office this morning as U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s new port director at the busy San Ysidro and Otay Mesa passenger ports of entry.

Maston, 45, succeeds interim Port Director David J. Murphy, who has filled the position for the past six weeks while a replacement was found for long time Port Director Oscar Preciado. Preciado recently assumed a new role as a liaison to the U.S. Government Services Administration during the port’s upcoming $577 million reconstruction project.

Maston was formally posted to his new position during a well attended change of command ceremony at the San Ysidro facility on Wednesday morning. Family, law enforcement colleagues from local, state and federal agencies, and area dignitaries watched Maston recite the oath of office during the 45-minute ceremony inside a port building.

He is the second CBP executive in San Diego to participate in a formal change of command ceremony, following a similar ceremony in June for Paul M. Morris, CBP’s Field Operations director in San Diego. CBP Field Operations recently adopted formal change of command ceremonies as one way to unify the workforce and highlight the agency mission.

Maston brings to the key San Diego position in-depth experience in overseeing large scale passenger and cargo processing programs. He most recently served more than two years as port director at the Miami international airport, managing more than 1,300 employees at the largest international operation in the U.S. for air cargo and the second largest for international traveler processing.

Maston’s recent responsibilities overseeing international traveler inspections, trade enforcement and tactical enforcement operations will provide the tools he needs to manage the busy 24-lane port of San Ysidro and nearby 13-lane Otay Mesa border station where, on average, 63,000 vehicles and 134,000 travelers enter the U.S. each day, CBP DFO Morris said.

Maston served from 2004 to 2006 as the assistant director of border security at CBP’s Miami Field Office. In this position, he oversaw border security operations for the Miami, Port Everglades, Key West and West Palm Beach ports of entry.

He began his federal career in 1985 as a Border Patrol agent in El Paso, Texas, later became a U.S. Customs Service inspector at the Calexico port of entry and served in progressively more responsible positions over the past two decades.

While mindful of the agency’s important border security mission, Maston said he will continue to support operations that have proved successful for the field office while striking a working balance between facilitation of legitimate travelers and the need for strong enforcement.

The CBP San Diego Field Office manages the work of more than 1,800 front-line federal officers at border stations in San Ysidro, Otay Mesa, Tecate, Calexico, and Andrade as well as the federal inspection stations at the San Diego seaport and international airports. The ports performed almost 66 million inspections of people, seized more than 145 tons of illegal narcotics and apprehended more than 42,000 immigration violators during the last fiscal year.

Wednesday, December 09, 2009

Secretary Napolitano Unveils “Virtual USA” Information-Sharing Initiative

December 9, 2009: Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Janet Napolitano today officially launched Virtual USA, an innovative information-sharing initiative—developed in collaboration with the emergency response community and state and local governments across the nation—that helps federal, state, local and tribal first responders communicate during emergencies.

“Our first responders need interoperable tools to make accurate and timely decisions during emergencies,” said Secretary Napolitano. “Virtual USA makes it possible for new and existing technologies to work together seamlessly during disaster response and recovery and gives the public an opportunity to contribute information in real-time to support the efforts of police officers, firefighters and other emergency management officials.”

The announcement came as part of the White House Open Government Initiative and reflects President Obama and Secretary Napolitano’s shared commitment to making government more efficient and fostering a culture of transparency, participation and collaboration.

Virtual USA links disparate tools and technologies in order to share the location and status of critical assets and information—such as power and water lines, flood detectors, helicopter-capable landing sites, emergency vehicle and ambulance locations, weather and traffic conditions, evacuation routes, and school and government building floor plans—across federal, state, local and tribal governments.

Virtual USA:
• Integrates Existing Frameworks and Investments: Virtual USA utilizes current information-sharing platforms to permit new and existing technologies to seamlessly exchange information with one another.
• Draws on Local Input: Virtual USA is based on the needs of local and state first responders to manage data access within their own jurisdictions and to share information with relevant jurisdictions across the nation.
• Employs a Comprehensive Approach: Virtual USA is not limited to information exchanges between two agencies; instead, the initiative fosters dynamic information sharing among all federal, state, local and tribal practitioners.
• Provides a Flexible, Accessible Platform: Because Virtual USA uses open data standards and open source software, more states and localities can join this information exchange project.
• Involves Everyone: Virtual USA allows Americans in their own communities to contribute information—in real-time—to support the efforts of police, fire and emergency management officials during disasters and recovery efforts.

Developed by the DHS Science and Technology Directorate (S&T), Virtual USA currently operates as a pilot in eight states—Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas, Virginia and Tennessee—with plans to incorporate additional states underway. In Virginia alone, Virtual USA has reduced response times to incidents involving hazardous materials by 70 percent.

For more information, visit www.dhs.gov.

Halfway House Escapee Also Wanted for Possession of Tailgate, Tires Concealing Marijuana Don’t Get Past Brownsville CBP Officers

December 09, 2009: U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers at the Veteran’s International Bridge discovered marijuana hidden in the tailgate of a pickup and concealed in four tires mounted on the truck and within the spare tire; one female U.S. citizen was arrested.

On Monday, December 7, at the Veteran’s International Bridge, CBP officers working primary operations encountered a white 1995 Dodge Dakota driven by 22-year-old Elizabeth Naomi Almazan, a U.S. citizen and resident of Brownsville, Texas. A CBP officer’s primary inspection revealed inconsistencies in the tires of the Dakota. The primary CBP officer referred the Dodge to secondary for an intensified examination.

“Vice,” a narcotic detector dog, further substantiated officers’ suspicions and alerted to the odor of narcotics emanating from the tailgate and tires of the pickup. In secondary, a non-intrusive imaging system scan indicated anomalies within the suspected areas of the Dodge. CBP officers dismantled the tailgate and tires and removed 33 packages from the tailgate and man-made compartments within the tires of the Dakota. The 33 packages contained a total of more than 107 pounds of marijuana.

The marijuana from this seizure has an estimated street value of more than $107,000. CBP officers arrested Elizabeth Naomi Almazan and turned her over to the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement special agents who investigated the seizure and processed her on federal drug charges.

“CBP officers working primary continue to stop smuggling attempts at the border. Our officers used their training and tools to prevent these dangerous drugs form entering the country. The interception of this load of marijuana is another great example of the outstanding job our officers are doing,” said Michael Freeman, CBP port director, Brownsville.

$1 Million Worth of Marijuana Seized by Agents at Strategically Placed Camp Grip

December 09, 2009: For the fourth time in a week, U.S. Border Patrol agents assigned to work out of Camp Grip prevented backpackers from smuggling drugs through a desolate area of southwest Arizona.

Early Tuesday morning, agents detected the illegal entry of six individuals about 30 miles west of the Lukeville. While tracking the set footprints across the desert, Border Patrol agents located six abandoned makeshift backpacks of marijuana along the groups’ path. Agents secured the contraband and continued tracking the group. The group of suspected smugglers doubled back and returned to Mexico.

Agents seized 286 pounds of marijuana with an estimated street value of $229,200. The marijuana was turned over to the Drug Enforcement Administration. Tuesday’s seizure brings the total amount of marijuana seized since Thursday to 1,371 pounds with an estimate street value of $1,096,800.

Camp Grip is Yuma Sector’s tactically deployed forward operating base that is designed to maintain operational control of the seam between the Yuma and Tucson Sectors. The success of Camp Grip demonstrates the Border Patrol’s ability to mobilize its enforcement stance along the southwest border where needed. These bases act as a deterrent and an additional detection platform, ensuring that smuggling organizations understand that if they operate in these areas, they will be pursued and apprehended.

The Sixth Session

The following is a review of The Sixth Session, written by Lieutenant Joe Hefferon, Essex County Sheriff’s Office:

ForeWord Clarion Review Four Stars (out of Five)
By Elizabeth A. Allen

The most hardened investigators are disturbed when they come across the corpse of a child; they’re even more disturbed when they find out it’s a baby who is partially dismembered. This gruesome specter starts off
Joe Hefferon’s Sixth Session, a mystery with supernatural inflections, and continues to haunt it till the last page.

Hefferon currently works as a lieutenant in the Essex County Sheriff’s office in New York State. The Sixth Session is his first novel; he is currently working on a second, due out in 2010. Having been a police officer for over two decades, Hefferon states that his experience in law enforcement informs his fiction.

One hopes, though, that the author has never had an experience like that of his protagonist, reporter Carter Jackson, who comes across the aforementioned tiny body near a Chinese restaurant. Because he is still deep in mourning for his dead wife (who visits him occasionally with amusingly foul-mouthed greetings), Carter feels a personal drive to involve himself in the murder case headed up by his brother, police officer Dalton Jackson. Carter’s quest for justice becomes downright weird, however, when a psychic tells him what’s really going on: a recapitulation of Herod’s killing of firstborns in an effort to erase the Messiah.

The mythological elements seep slowly into The Sixth Session, however. At first the novel grounds itself in the shadowy world of noir detective stories. The weather’s
always grey; the nights are always seamy; Carter’s grief hangs ponderously over him; and even such innocuous things as tropical scents are described in a macabre fashion: “The light rode along a vapor of incense. It smelled acrid and fruity, like a piña colada with a burnt finger in it.” Walking a fine line between grittiness and overdoneness, The Sixth Session, for the most part, pulls off a richly detailed, slightly hallucinatory atmosphere.

Besides strong writing, The Sixth Session also boasts affecting characters and masterful pacing. As a main character, Carter is drowning in sadness enough to be sympathetic, but not so much as to be a pathetic stick-in-the-mud. His thoughts of his dead wife flesh out both his personality and hers, while moving quickly enough that they don’t bog down the story.

The book’s pace is neat and quick, with scenes only as long as they need to be, and the dialogue is snarky and to-the-point. Hefferon, who seems familiar with classic detective stories, synthesizes the noir genre’s rapid timing with a penchant for earthiness pushed to the point of nastiness. The result is a mystery that, in its best moments has shades of supernatural horror. The book is an exceptional first effort.

About the Author
Lieutenant
Joe Hefferon of the Essex County Sheriff’s Office is a 22 yeaer veteran of law enforcement who is currently assigned to the office of the chief. He “has been a police officer for more than twenty-two years. His experiences have given him access to the scarier hallways of the human psyche, helping to layer his narrative with poignancy, grit, and dark humor. Joe is the proud parent of two beautiful children, Jack and Kaitlin.” Lieutenant Joe Hefferon is the author of The Sixth Session.

More Information about the book:
Joe Hefferon

CBP Officers at Hidalgo/Reynosa International Bridge Seize $1.9 Million in Cocaine

December 08, 2009: U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers working at the Hidalgo/Reynosa International Bridge seized approximately 60 pounds of cocaine with an estimated street value of close to $1.9 million last Friday afternoon.

On December 4, CBP officers and K-9 units working enforcement operations at the Hidalgo/Reynosa International Bridge came in contact with a northbound 1992 Chevrolet pick-up truck. The driver was identified as Luis Carlos Luna Romo, a Mexican citizen, age 18 from Reynosa, Tamaulipas, Mexico. While in secondary, “Laika”, a narcotic detector dog, alerted officers to the presence of narcotic odors emanating from the truck.

A non-intrusive image scan revealed anomalies within the truck’s interior rear cab wall. While conducting an intensive examination of the pickup truck, officers removed 25 cocaine packages that were found hidden within the truck. After his arrest, Luna Romo was transferred to the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement special agents who continue to investigate this failed smuggling attempt. Pending appearance before a U.S. Magistrate, Luna Romo remains incarcerated.

Hector A. Mancha, CBP port director, Hidalgo/Pharr said, “I commend our K-9 units and officers for their work in seizing this drug load.” Mancha further said, “K-9 Laika was instrumental in alerting officers to the presence of drug odors. Great work by all involved.”

Tuesday, December 08, 2009

Age Determination Practices for Unaccompanied Alien Children in ICE Custody

The Department of Homeland Security Immigration and Customs Enforcement enforces United States immigration law by apprehending, detaining, and deporting individuals who are not authorized to remain in the country. Children are sometimes among those encountered, and the Department of Homeland Security must ensure that they are not detained with unrelated adults.

To separate unaccompanied children from detained adults, the Department of Homeland Security attempts to establish the date of birth of anyone it cannot readily identify as an adult or child. Immigration officials collect information on possible juveniles to ascertain their correct ages. Information may include professional opinions based on dental or skeletal radiographs. However, the use of radiographs to determine chronological age—age from a person’s date of birth—has been criticized by some in the medical and advocacy communities as unreliable.

We reviewed Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s approach to age determinations at the request of the House Appropriations Committee. In House Report 110-862, the committee said that the department had “not ceased its reliance on bone and dental forensics for child age determinations, as directed” in a previous report. In its request, the committee asked us to report on any cases in which Immigration and Customs Enforcement used bone and dental forensics in 2008 or 2009.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement does not track age determination data; therefore, we were unable to identify all cases where it used radiographs for age determinations. Based on interviews with officials, and our review of selected files and guidance, we concluded that Immigration and Customs Enforcement recognizes the limits of radiographs and strives to obtain additional information when making age determinations. We are making recommendations to track age determination data better, update guidance for field offices, and ensure that radiographic exam results include all required information and are properly documented.

MORE INFORMATION
http://www.dhs.gov/xoig/assets/mgmtrpts/OIG_10-12_Nov09.pdf