Criminal Justice News

Tuesday, July 29, 2008

Hunter Adopted by Hopkins

July 29, 2008, (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. James H. Lilley, the Police-Writer.com Author of the Year (2008), has had his book, The Eyes of the Hunter, adopted by Johns Hopkins University.

James H. Lilley is a former Marine and Police Sergeant with the Howard County Police Department (Maryland). He worked in the Uniformed Patrol Division, Criminal Investigations Division, Forensic Services (CSI) and Drug Enforcement Division. His Street Drug Unit was featured in the book "Undercover" by Hans Halberstadt and published by Simon and Schuster. Some of his awards include The Medal of Valor, Four Bronze Stars, Four Unit Citations and the Governor's Citation. He is also an 8th Degree Black Belt in Shorin Ryu Karate. James Lilley is the author of seven books: A Question of Honor; The Eyes of the Hunter; The Far Side of the Bridge; Just Retribution; A Miracle for Tony Clements; Death Knocks Twice, and, A Tony Clements Christmas Miracle.

According to Sheldon Greenberg, Ph.D. (Associate Dean, School of Education, Johns Hopkins University), “The Eyes of the Hunter will be used as a text for the Communications course in the Master of Science in Intelligence Analysis degree program at Johns Hopkins University.” Dr. Sheldon continued that Lilley’s book will help the students “focus on creativity and critical thinking, research, understanding the audience, and formulating meaningful written documents.”

The course The Eyes of the Hunter will be used in is “Communications: Fact, Opinion, Significance, and Consequence.” According to the course description, “Within the intelligence community, findings are of little value unless they are communicated well. Dissemination of findings is essential to the success of any analysis or research. Students learn to deliver written, oral, and visual presentations for maximum effect by considering factors such as intended outcome, timing, structure, and method. Working individually and in small groups, students address issues such as lack of time to plan and prepare, unfamiliarity with the customer (end user of analytical documents), disruption and change, and coping with the unexpected. Students receive ongoing feedback on their communication style and effectiveness.

The ability to justify and present an analytical conclusion in clear, succinct prose is essential to supplying policy makers with information they need to formulate decisions. Students consider traditional and innovative methods of intelligence writing and briefing, focusing on the difference between fact and opinion. Students prepare written reports and presentations on a variety of topics and, in doing so, construct narratives, establish project credibility, convey recommendations, and reinforce key messages.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 1029
police officers (representing 431 police departments) and their 2189 criminal justice books in 33 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Monday, July 28, 2008

Schools as Terror Targets

On August 6, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature an interview of John Giduck on the Beslan School Seige. According to Esquire Magazine, “On the first day of school in 2004, a Chechen terrorist group struck the Russian town of Beslan. Targeting children, they took more than eleven hundred hostages. John Giduck is the author of Terror at Beslan: A Russian Tragedy with Lessons for America's Schools.

Program Date: August 6, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Schools as Terror Targets
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/08/07/Schools-as-Terror-Targets

About the Guest
John Giduck has a Bachelor’s Degree from Penn State and a law degree from the University of Denver. He also earned a Master’s Degree in International Affairs, specializing in Russian studies, from the University of Colorado, which included completion of the Russian Culture and Language Program at St. Petersburg State University in Russia. He has traveled extensively throughout Russia and the former Soviet Union, training with Russia’s elite Special Forces units for more than 10 years; and, is a certified instructor in Russian Special Forces hand to hand combat.

John Giduck has trained state and federal
law enforcement officers and agents, including DEA, FBI, US Marshal’s Service, and SWAT teams throughout the US. He has served as a consultant on various international and terrorism subjects, and as a Russian Organized Crime instructor, for numerous federal and state agencies. He currently devotes his professional time to the Archangel Group, providing anti-terrorism consulting and training to U.S. law enforcement, government and military, part of which includes John serving as a civilian contract U.S. Army Special Forces hand-to-hand combat and firearms instructor. As well, he holds several black belts, is a multiple inductee into international martial arts halls of fame, and is a former U.S. national weightlifting champion.

John Giduck is a lifetime member of the Special Operations Association, Rocky Mountain Tactical Team Association, Russian Special Forces Brotherhood of the Red Beret Association, and is a lifetime executive member of the British Professional Bodyguard Association. He is a graduate of the FBI Citizen’s Academy and holds the highest level expert certification in
Homeland Security through the American College of Forensic Examiners International, and is a former member of the Executive Advisory Board of the American College of Homeland Security and Police Marksman magazine. He is a current member of the Advisory Board of the College of Disaster Medicine and Management of Philadelphia University. In addition to other published materials and articles on terrorism, Russian organized crime and close quarters tactics, finished his book, Terror at Beslan: A Russian Tragedy With Lessons for America’s Schools, in 2005. His second book, co-authored with Green Beret Sergeant Major John Anderson, entitled The Green Beret In You: Living With Total Commitment To Family, Career, Sports and Life, was published in late 2007.

As part of his work with Archangel, John Giduck is also a scuba, tactical diving and CQB instructor, and teaches terrorist-hostage negotiations, narco-
terrorism, terrorism and global organized crime, and Russian organized crime courses. He is now working on his doctoral dissertation on the global expansion of radical Islam through King’s College of London.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/08/07/Schools-as-Terror-Targets

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Thursday, July 24, 2008

Practical Street Wisdom

Practical Street Wisdom is a collection short stories and articles written by law enforcement officials. The authors were asked a question: What is the one thing you want cops to know? When completed the book will contain some of the collective wisdom of over 50 street cops.

American Heroes Press is soliciting contributions:

1. Authors must be sworn law enforcement officials.
2. Articles and stories should 900 to 1800 words.
3. The submission must be original work.
4. You must include an up to 100 bio to follow you article (include contact information if you want that published, also.
5. You must sign a release.

Submissions:
http://www.police-writers.com/practical_street_wisdom.html

Public Safety Technology in the News

Mapping Technology Used to Curb Drunk Driving
9news.com, (06/28/2008), Adam Chodak

The Weld County (Colorado) Sheriff's Office is using GIS
Technology to reduce drunken driving incidents. The agency has the responsibility of patrolling and monitoring 3,000 miles of roads. In an effort to prevent and reduce DUI incidents, the agency is using GIS Technology to help generate "hotspot" maps that key on DUI-related traffic reports. Officers then use the information as a guide when conducting DUI checkpoints. Prior to the use of GIS Technology, the agency relied on word-of-mouth reports or used officers to review traffic reports to assess where to place the checkpoints. Agency officials say the use of GIS Technology has led to more effective use of agency resources and staff.
www.9news.com/news/article.aspx?storyid=94655&catid=188

Police Get High-Tech Help
Opelika-Auburn News, (07/07/2008), Katie Stallcup

Veteran
law enforcement officers have the ability and perspective to see firsthand how Technology has affected their jobs. Technology advancements include the use of mobile data terminals (MDTs) in police cruisers versus officers having to return to the station to work at a desktop computer, or in some cases a typewriter, to fill out forms or search for information. Another equipment advancement is the use of lightweight body armor, as opposed to body armor of the 1970s that was big, bulky, and very rigid. Technology advancements in other aspects of law enforcement have led to the conclusion that technology is becoming an important aspect of an officer's job; however face-to-face human contact is still important for the communities they serve.
www.oanow.com/oan/news/local/article/police_get_high_tech_help/21761/

McCain Pushes for Public Safety Network
Cnet.com, (07/02/2008), Marguerite Reardon

Senator John McCain has indicated his support for the establishment of a National Public Safety Network. Speaking at the National Sheriff's Association's annual conference in July, McCain, who is the presumptive Republican nominee for president, said his plan is to have the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) make more radio spectrum available for public safety, while limiting the amount of spectrum available for the private sector. The FCC auctioned off a portion of the spectrum that will be vacated as a result of the transition of TV broadcasts from analog to digital in 2009. The auction, however, did not provide the anticipated results, so a second auction may occur. The FCC is also exploring a possible auction of "white space" spectrum, the area between broadcast TV channels. Internet and
computer companies have indicated that this portion of the spectrum could be used for wireless broadband networking.
news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-9983187-94.html

Police Wnt U to Fight crime w/txt Msgs
Associated Press, (07/02/2008), Mitch Stacy

Since
police agencies in Boston and Cincinnati began accepting text messages about a year ago, the number of agencies that have adopted or plan to adopt similar Technology has grown to more than 100. The option has already proved useful for a hearing-impaired man in Boston who used text messaging to file a domestic violence report. For citizen tipsters, the system allows anonymity by routing messages through a server that encrypts the tipster's cell phone number. Rewards for successful tips are still offered; the text message tip provider is issued a code to provide to the bank issuing the reward. Agencies acknowledge that just like crime hotlines, text messaging may take time to catch on, and officers need time to become fluent in text message shorthand, but the potential exists for success.
news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080702/ap_on_hi_te/police_text_messages

Hernando: Interactive
crime Tracking
Tampa Bay's 10 News, (07/07/2008), Elizabeth Gold

The Hernando County Sheriff's Office in Florida is the first county in the State, and one of five nationally, to implement an online
crime mapping system available to the public. Citizens with computer access can view an interactive map of the agency's service area and zoom in to get details of various crimes by clicking on an icon. The site statistics and information go back only 30 days to reduce volume, and the information will be updated every morning. Florida law prohibits the agency from providing data that could put a victim's safety at risk in cases like child abuse, stalking, or other sex crimes.
www.tampabays10.com/news/local/crime/story.aspx?storyid=84279&catid=82

Non-Lethal Weapons: Police
Technology Targets Enhanced Safety
News.inventhelp.com, (07/08/2008), Shad Connelly

Tools for
law enforcement that make apprehension of suspects safer for all parties involved are being developed for many scenarios. For example, the StarChase System mounts inside the grill of a patrol car. It uses a compressed air launcher with a laser targeting system to launch at the fleeing vehicle a GPS device that contains a transmitter, a receiver, and a power supply. Once the device is deployed, dispatchers and other qualified agency personnel can track the car and use the data to facilitate an intercept of the suspect vehicle. They can also decide that officers should discontinue the pursuit and track the vehicle to a better location for apprehension. For foot patrol officers, a LED Incapacitator is available that works the same way as a flashlight. It uses an extremely bright flashing sequence in multiple colors and patterns that makes it difficult for a human brain to adjust. This disorients the suspect, temporarily providing the officer with cover and the chan! ce to apprehend the suspect.
news.inventhelp.com/Articles/Security/Inventions/starchase-12468.aspx

Dogs' New Trick: Finding Cell Phones
The Washington Post, (07/10/2008), Dan Morse

The Maryland Department of Corrections has enlisted the services of three dogs to thwart smuggling of cell phones into prisons. Cell phones in prison provide inmates the opportunity to continue to carry on illegal activity outside the prison, threaten or intimidate witnesses relating to their case, or conduct activity within the prison. The part of the cell phone that dogs key on for searches is not clear, but for dogs cell phone detection is harder that marijuana detection. Also employing this technique is the Virginia Department of Corrections, which currently has six dogs trained.
www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/07/09/AR2008070902174.html?hpid=topnews

Company Designs
law enforcement Tool
The Stamford Times, (07/10/2008), Stephanie Paulino

A new product will help
law enforcement gather cell phone forensic. Developed by iCard Forensics, Trace can extract data from one of the 1,300 cell phones it is compatible with and then generate a report for use by investigators. The report can detail inbound and outbound calls, e-mail, phone location in relation to cell towers, and text and photo messaging. The unit employs write blocker to prevent damage to the cell phone and possible evidence during extraction. Trace is capable of interacting with Verizon, Sprint/Nextel, and AT&T phones. The product will be distributed to agencies on a case-by-case basis, and includes a 1-year license that will have to be renewed.
www.thestamfordtimes.com/stamford_templates/stamford_story/360418338572963.php

OnStar Can 'Catch' Stolen Vehicles
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, (07/09/2008), Jill King Greenwood

New antitheft
Technology from OnStar will serve to keep citizens safe and help law enforcement end pursuits in safely. The Pennsylvania State Police received a demonstration of how the product works. Once the vehicle is reported stolen or identified by police as stolen, the OnStar dispatcher can enable the hazard lights to alert other drivers that the car is experiencing a problem and to alert law enforcement that the car is equipped with OnStar Stolen Vehicle Slowdown Technology. The hazard lights are only visible outside the vehicle; the thief will see nothing on the console. The officers can then contact OnStar to activate the system, which will allow the driver to steer and brake, but the car will slow down regardless of how hard the driver presses the gas pedal. Once the situation is declared clear by police OnStar will reactivate the car.
www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/s_576648.html

New Pornography-Detection Tool Makes It Difficult for Sex Offenders and Teens to Hide Pornography
PRWeb.com, (07/10/2008)

A tool originally developed for and used by
law enforcement to investigate pornography is being expanded for use by parents, schools, and businesses. SurfRecon 2008, developed by SurfRecon, Inc., is a portable, rapid-image-analysis tool that can identify pornographic material on most computers systems. The package provides law enforcement with the ability to quickly scan a computer to locate, group, report on, and delete files from the computer. The company felt the Technology is a tool that could benefit parents and business. Local, State, and Federal law enforcement and adult parole and probation officers currently use the product, which comes preinstalled on a thumb or flash drive for portability.
www.prweb.com/releases/surfrecon/tool/prweb1015174.htm

New Body Armor Standard

Body armor (which is commonly but inaccurately called "bulletproof" vests) has saved the lives of more than 3,000 law enforcement officers since 1975. NIJ has revised the standard for body armor to require rigorous testing of the vests that now includes conditions of high heat, humidity and mechanical wear before ballistic testing. The standard ensures that the vests police officer wear will continue to protect them as the material ages.

The revised standard is the fruit of the Justice Department's Body Armor Safety Initiative. The initiative followed the failure of a vest worn by a police officer in Forest Hills, Pa. While the officer survived the shooting, he had serious injuries. The shooting was the only case ever reported to NIJ in which body armor compliant with the standard failed to prevent penetration for a bullet it was designed to defeat.

Download the new standard from NIJ's web site at www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/pubs-sum/223054.htm.

Tuesday, July 22, 2008

Digital delivery of Wisdom

For the body’s sustenance, complex food substances are broken down into simple building blocks and energy sources. Similarly, when complex knowledge is broken down to its irreducible minimum, it is a simple digital code or in Alpha language, “Yes” and “ No.” If these assumptions are true, then, the code on which Equilibrium Thinking, a framework and tool developed and taught by me through my website (www.eqthinking.com), through my Audio CD and through workshops is the key to the human mind. That code or key is “be at it: beat it.” With these two tools be at it, (meaning “be positive”) and beat it” (meaning beat negative), a person can navigate all the complexities of the real world. It transforms one’s emotions through enhanced emotional intelligence, one’s will through enhanced persistence quotient and one’s thoughts through reinforcing the positive and negating the negatives in his/her mind.

This thought process enabled Rajkumar Ramachandran, final year student of Vellore Institute of
Technology to overcome his negative thoughts and excel in a series of four campus placement interviews to be selected in Tata Consultancy Service. Facing the odds of stiff competition, he happened to access the website www.eqthinking.com and agreed with the premise that mere positive thinking does not enable a person to overcome the power of the deeply ingrained negatives in human nature. He learnt the new programming language for the mind from the website and within a few days broken the power of his internal conditioning to fail and instead, succeeded in overcoming his fears and tension. He continued to excel and taught many of his classmates the new programming language in which to talk to themselves. When their self talk changed, their thoughts changed, their emotions changed, their relationships changed for the better and their lives were transformed. That case study of a person who learnt my thought process without even meeting me convinced me of the ability of digital Technology to reach millions of people across the globe.

A few years earlier one John Hanson, a former
law enforcement officer in the USA sent me an email, stating that he had visited the above website and wanted an audio CD. Shortly, after he received the CD, he emailed some further questions. In the next mail, he stated that he had already experienced some changes in his mind and said that he could use it for combat conditioning of military troops.

A woman of Indian origin whose husband, a Vice President in Citicorp, N.Y. had survived narrowly the 911 attack sent me mail after being impressed by the content on the same website. She sent me feedback that it helped her overcome her post traumatic depression. Truly, eqthinking has proved to be IT with a difference- it is Insight
Technology. It is also digital as it works on a dual code of yes and no-no.

All the above examples in addition to feedback received from live Powerpoint presentations in workshops including a Videoconferencing event in which more than a thousand IT workers of Infosys in all the Infy development centers heard me convinced me that digital
Technology can be used to deliver wisdom and not mere knowledge or information. Now, a mass campaign has been launched in Tamil Nadu to reach all students in high school and colleges across the state. An eleven minute audio CD on eqthinking is played and the students are asked to access the website for further information. The schools and colleges are also asked to form eqthinking clubs to encourage eqthinking among the millions of young people in India. What President Shri APJ Abdul Kalam rightly attempted but could not fully succeed, namely imparting a 2020 vision to India’s youth can be done only through leveraging on digital Technology over a period of time.

www.eqthinking.com
www.prateepphilip.com
www.friendsofpolice.org

About the Author
Dr.
Prateep V. Philip is a member of the Indian Police Service. Currently, he is the Inspector General of Police, Social Justice and Human Rights, Tamil Nadu, Chennai, India. During his law enforcement career, he has served as the as District Superintendent of Police of Four Districts, SP, Narcotics Intelligence Bureau of Tamil Nadu, Principal, Police Training College and as DIG, CB CID (Special Investigation Team) Chennai, DIG Intelligence, DIG Tirunelveli Range. He has a BA in Economics, Political Science and History; an MA in Political Science and International Relations; and, a PhD in Public Administration.

Dr.
Prateep V. Philip is the author of The Friends of Police Movement: A Roadmap for Proactive People Protection.

Homicide Investigations

On August 1, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with Lieutenant-Commander Vernon J. Geberth, M.S., M.P.S. (NYPD, ret.) on homicide investigations.

Program Date: August 1, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic:
Homicide Investigations
Listen Live: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

About the Guest

Vernon J. Geberth, M.S., M.P.S. is a retired Lieutenant-Commander of the New York City Police Department with over forty years of law enforcement experience. He has personally investigated, supervised, assessed, researched and consulted on over 8000 death investigations. In addition, Commander Vernon J. Geberth has been the recipient of more than 60 awards for bravery and exceptional police work and is a member of the New York City Police Department’s Honor Legion.

Commander
Vernon J. Geberth has a Master’s Degree of Professional Studies (M.P.S.) C.W. Post College, Long Island University and a second Master’s of Science Degree in Psychology (M.S.), California Coast University, Santa Ana, California. He earned his Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) at Iona College in New Rochelle, New York and he is also a graduate of the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia 119th Session, (1979). Commander Vernon J. Geberth is a member of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS).

Commander Geberth, is the author of Practical
Homicide Investigation: Tactics, Procedures, and Forensic Techniques, which is now in it’s Fourth Edition and is recognized in the law enforcement field as "The Bible of Homicide Investigation" and the Practical Homicide Investigation Checklist and Field Guide, which is considered by professionals as an essential prerequisite in conducting proficient death inquiries. He is also the author of Sex-Related Homicide and Death Investigation: Practical and Clinical Perspectives, which is considered the framework textbook on sex-related murder.

In addition, he created and serves as the Series Editor of Practical Aspects of Criminal and
Forensic Investigations for Taylor & Francis CRC Press, LLC Inc. in Boca Raton, Florida and has proposed and edited over forty publications within this series.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Monday, July 21, 2008

U.N. Agency Declares Afghan Province 'Nearly Poppy-Free'

By Navy Lt. Neil Myers

Special to American Forces Press Service

July 21, 2008 - The United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime recently declared Afghanistan's Konar province to be "nearly poppy-free" in 2006 and 2007. During a July 6 trip to the province, Afghanistan's minister for counter-narcotics, Gen. Khodaidad, announced that Konar has qualified for two monetary awards totaling $750,000 from the Counter-narcotics Trust Fund.

Konar Gov. Sayed Fazlullah Wahidi and his provincial council decided to use $420,000 of that money to upgrade the Konar Teacher Training College with a 60-room dormitory, dining facility and meeting hall. A lack of dormitories requires students of either to commute or to rent local accommodations while attending school.

"This is a great day for Konar and Afghanistan", said Navy Cmdr. Daniel Dwyer, Konar Provincial Reconstruction Team commander. "When you see the government of Afghanistan, on its own, bringing projects to its people that provide for long-term jobs and economic growth, it shows everyone that progress is well on its way."

After Khodaidad's remarks, Wahidi, members of parliament and the delegation moved to the site of the future college facilities for the ceremonial groundbreaking.

"This province is devoted to eliminating poppy in spite of the many problems facing farmers," said Khudaidaad, who thanked the province's elders, who have been campaigning against narcotics.

Wahidi and the Provincial Development Council have not yet decided whether they want to spend the rest of the money on one large provincial project or distribute it for small, district-level projects. The governor said that he will spend some of the money to build irrigation canals and to make educational improvements.

"The people of Konar deserve the credit for the poppy eradication," Wahidi said. "All the tribal elders and people of Konar are committed to putting an end to this [poppy] seed, because the smuggling, trafficking and growing of narcotics is forbidden by Islam."

(Navy Lt. Neil Myers serves with the Konar Provincial Reconstruction Team.)

Friday, July 18, 2008

Police Search and Seizure

On July 25, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with David Waksman on Police Search and Seizure.

Program Date: July 25, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic:
Police Search and Seizure
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/07/26/Police-Search-and-Seizure

About the Guest
David Waksman, J.D., is a nationally known homicide prosecutor with vast experience in trying violent offenders. David Waksman has toiled 32 years in the criminal courts of Miami, Florida, after working the mean streets of The South Bronx for six years as a police officer and rising to the rank of sergeant in the New York Police Department. He may have tried more first-degree murder cases than any other American prosecutor.

David Waksman's career as a prosecutor began under the legendary Richard Gerstein. He also worked eighteen years as an assistant to America's most popular, and longest serving Attorney General, Janet Reno, when she served as Miami's top prosecutor. During that time period he tried over eighty-five homicide cases to juries, including twenty in which the death penalty was sought.

David Waksman, not content to fight his battles in Miami-Dade County, has been teaching the cops of America the law and procedures they need to combat violent crimes in their communities. Since 1988 he has taught a monthly seminar on homicide investigation for the Southern Police Institute (University of Louisville) in various locations (22 states, 34 cities) across the country. He also teaches new detectives, crime scene technicians, medical examiners and forensic investigators at the nationally renowned Dade County Medical Examiner's Police-Medical Investigation of Death seminar. He has taught classes (one a Fourth Amendment seminar) at the University of Miami School of Law and at several colleges in the South Florida area. Local police departments continually call upon David Waksman to teach refresher courses and in-service training to their investigators. David Waksman is the author of the Search and Seizure Handbook.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/07/26/Police-Search-and-Seizure

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Monday, July 14, 2008

Partnership to Help Army Reserve, D.C. Police Share Same Talent Pool

By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

July 14, 2008 - The adage, "If you can't beat 'em, join 'em," got a new twist today as the
Army Reserve and the Metropolitan Police of the District of Columbia signed a partnership deal so they can recruit, hire and train people for both organizations. MPDC became the first law enforcement agency to partner with the Army Reserve in a unique arrangement that Army Lt. Gen. Jack Stultz, chief of the Army Reserve, called a win-win for the military as well as the police. Instead of competing for the same talent pool, they can now join forces to fill their ranks and train their members.

The agreement, signed at the
Metropolitan Police Academy here, enables Army Reserve recruiters to refer recruits signing on as military police or active-duty military police joining the Army Reserve for civilian jobs with the MPDC. Similarly, the police department can refer its members for Army Reserve jobs.

The arrangement will enable the two organizations to help each other fill critical shortages while also taking advantage of the training and experience base both provide their members, Stultz said.

Thomas F. Hall, assistant secretary of defense for reserve affairs, noted today that the
Army Reserve and MPDC are looking for recruits with many of the same attributes. Both want honest, drug-free members who know how to lead as well as follow and love their country and communities, he said.

Army 1st Sgt. Ryan Ervin of the 200th Military
Police Command at Fort Meade, Md., also an MPDC officer, said the Metropolitan Police Department and Army Reserve both stand to benefit from sharing the professional, career-minded and goal-oriented recruits each attracts. Army experience gives police recruits an ability to think on their feet, work within a command structure and show flexibility when it's needed, he said.

Meanwhile, Stultz said, civilian police experience brings strong negotiating, interrogation and
crime scene investigation skills to the Army Reserve.

The MPDC partnership is the Army Reserve's fifth so far, but about 50 others are in the works and nearly 150 additional employers have expressed interest in forming one.

What makes the concept so popular, even in the face of reserve deployments, is that it helps employers realize the upside of hiring
Army Reservists, Stultz said. "Don't look at the Reserve as a drain on your force. Look at it as a value added," he said he tells employers.

As the long list of employers considering new partnerships grows, it's evident that employers already recognize the attributes Army Reservists bring to their work force, said Army Col. Dianna Cleven, an Office of the Army Reserve director. The advantage of partnerships, she said, is that it provides a formal structure so employers can find and tap into the Army Reserve's talent base while also providing an avenue for
Army Reservists to link up with potential employers.

"It's a mechanism to link reservists looking for jobs in specific skills," Cleven said. "We're providing that mechanism through these partnerships that helps them connect the dots."

The MPDC, which needs to recruit about 350
police officers a year, sees the Army Reserve as a prime recruiting ground, Assistant Chief Joshua Ederheimer said during today's partnership signing ceremony at the Metropolitan Police Academy. He noted that the two organizations share a cultural ethos of service and sacrifice, with their members understanding and accepting personal risk to protect their fellow citizens.

Meanwhile, because the Army Reserve provides 93 percent of the Army's total military police force, its members who report for duty with the MPDC arrive with extensive military
police training already under their belts.

Some arrive after active-duty assignments in military police units. Others are new recruits who attend basic training, then advanced individual training in
military police skills before reporting to their Army Reserve units and starting their civilian careers.

"By that time, he is not just a high school graduate. Now he is a soldier," Stultz said. "He's got discipline. He's got
leadership. He's got a work ethic and he's had training. Then (MPDC) can take him and develop him further."

MPDC Chief Cathy Lanier called the new partnership "a very significant and important step for us" that will help her department recruit and retain the high-skilled work force it it needs. "It will help make our force stronger and our city safer," she said.

Lanier can look within her own force for a glimpse into what the new partnership will offer. One of her officers, Greg Naguerka, arrived at the
Metropolitan Police Academy in 2005 with seven years of military police experience that he said gave him a big leg up over his fellow police cadets.

Now an
Army Reserve staff sergeant with the 200th Military Police Command at Fort Meade, Md., Nagurerka said his Army experience made him mentally prepared and physically fit for his police training and provided a strong foundation for his police career.
Army Sgt. Scott Dignan served with the MPDC for six years before joining the Army Reserve 12 years ago, and said the
military has trained and tested him in ways that have boosted his civilian career.

"It has opened my eyes to a whole different way of leading and has been a true asset to me," said Dignan, now a lieutenant with the
Metropolitan Police Department. "Between the leadership training and the deployments, it has taught me a lot about myself and given me experience that's been invaluable."

Stultz called today's signing ceremony a big day not just for the Army Reserve, but for the Army as a whole, which counts on its citizen-soldiers to sustain the all-volunteer force. To do that, he said, the
Army Reserve needs to work cooperatively with civilian employers.

"A number of employers out there are saying that this is a great idea," and a way to attract everything from truck drivers to medical technologists to engineers to law enforcement officers to their work forces. "You name it, we've got it," Stultz said. "Partnerships help provide the conduit."

Saturday, July 12, 2008

Become a Private Investigator

On July 18, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with Jimmie Mesis on how to become a private investigator.

Program Date: July 18, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic:
Become a Private Investigator
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/07/19/Become-a-Private-Investigator

About the Guest
Jimmie Mesis is probably one the most recognized and respected
private investigators throughout the United States and abroad. For the last 28 years, he has created and sold numerous companies related to the field of investigations including several investigative agencies that have generated millions of dollars in revenue. He currently owns a marketing consulting firm, several Internet based companies including his latest venture, PI Gear, a discount surveillance equipment company.

However, he and his investigator wife, Rosemarie are best known as the owners of PI Magazine, the only international trade publication of
private investigators. In less than 4 years the magazine has grown from less than 1,000 readers to over 30,000 readers with subscribers in 22 countries. Jimmie Mesis is the recipient of numerous awards including, Investigator of the Year Award, Speaker of the Year, and the recipient of the Hal Lipset Award for Investigative Excellence presented to him by the World Association of Detectives.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Thursday, July 10, 2008

Public Safety Technology in the News

Military WrapsTM Unveils New Camouflage Technology PIRATETM
Stockhouse.com, (06/13/2008)

To aid
law enforcement and military personnel in achieving realistic training exercises, Military WrapsTM, Inc., which specializes in camouflage concealment, has created Photo-Immersive Realistic Aides for Training Environments (PIRATETM). The system is designed to accurately create and depict situations based on high-megapixel images that can be altered to enhance the perception of scale and perspective for the user, and then the images are printed to special vinyls. These vinyls can be used to make rooms, offices, city blocks, schools, or parade routes and then be applied to the interior or exterior of the agencies training facility.
www.stockhouse.com/News/USReleasesDetail.aspx?n=6939185

Tasers Getting More Prominent Role in Crime Fighting in City
The New York Times, (06/15/2008), Al Baker

One of the Nation's largest
police forces is re-evaluating the use of the Taser as a less-lethal option for the department. However, the New York City Police Department (NYPD) isn't just putting the units out on the streets; it is using a study from the RAND Corporation, using feedback from department personnel about the study, and using an internal study between two similar departments (one with the Taser and one without) as a guide for the implementation of the Taser. The RAND study was commissioned in 2007 after a police-involved shooting found two things: that additional study would be needed based on current available Taser use data, and the department's 455 fatal police-involved shootings may have ended differently had a Taser been an alternative. For now, NYPD's plan is to move Tasers from the trunks of certain vehicles to the gun belts of the agency's 3,500 sergeants while continuing to analyze full implementation of the Taser units.
www.nytimes.com/2008/06/15/nyregion/15taser.html?_r=1&ref=nyregion&oref=slogin

GE Security's MobileTrace Helps Iredell County Sheriff Identify Narcotics-Tainted Cash
BusinessWire.com, (06/16/2008)

Iredell County Sheriff's Office officers using GE Security, Inc's MobileTrace were able to seize almost $300,000 cash from a rental car stop. The MobileTrace
technology is portable and capable of detecting explosive and narcotics at the same time. The information collected by the units can be used as evidence and allows officers to evaluate findings in a timely fashion while in the field.
www.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20080616005275&newsLang=en

DuPont Announces New Kevlar
Technology
Forbes.com, (06/16/2008), Randall Chase

The development of a more demanding National Institute of
Justice (NIJ) standard for body armor has resulted in DuPont, Inc., producing a new Kevlar product. The new product is a lighter woven material coupled with a new process for coating the fibers. According to DuPont, the new material will stop the projectile sooner with less layers, allowing the remaining layers to protect against backface deformation. The new material will have a broad range of applications for the company, but initially the aim is greater protection for law enforcement against high-caliber handguns.
www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2008/06/16/ap5121589.html

Tech-Savvy: Mineral Co. Sheriff's Office Gets New Equipment
News-Tribune, (06/13/2008), Bobbie Carpenter

The Mineral County Sheriff's Office is purchasing laptops to be installed in 6 of the agency's 12 cruisers. These laptops must be in place and be used to transmit electronic traffic reports by 2009 in order to comply with a State mandated law. The first six laptops were purchased using a Federal grant from the Governor's Highway Safety Program, and additional laptops for the remaining cruisers will hopefully be funded through the county's budget. The sheriff's office used concealed weapons funding to purchase the mounts for the first six vehicles to be equipped with the laptops.
www.newstribune.info/news/x822800157/Tech-savvy-Mineral-Co-Sheriff-s-Department-gets-new-equipment

Police Use GPS-Equipped Bait Car to Catch Car Thieves
Government
Technology, (06/09/2008), Jim McKay

Catching car thieves using a bait car began in the late 1990s, but required much police manpower to monitor the vehicle. Times have changed, and now officers can go about their regular duties instead of monitoring the vehicle. In
Sacramento, California, the bait car is equipped with GPS that activates should the car be tampered with or started, and alerts police dispatch at the command center so they can track the vehicle's location and notify nearby officers to respond. Should the thief try to run when officers attempt to stop the vehicle, the dispatcher will be notified and has the ability to activate the car's kill switch, which will gradually slow down and shut off the vehicle. For added measure, the dispatcher can also lock the car to prevent the thief from running away on foot. Benefits of this type of system are huge, both for police and the public because it eliminates and/or significantly reduces the opportunity for a high-speed chase.
www.govtech.com/gt/366274?topic=117680

CSI: Anchorage-Summertime Sleuths
Anchorage Daily News, (06/16/2008), Megan Holland

Riding the popularity wave of the "CSI" series and subsequent spinoffs, a summer camp started by a South Anchorage High biology teacher draws on the popularity to teach students and maybe develop future
forensic specialists. Students participate in mock crime scenes to gather and analyze evidence to help solve the "crime." Along the way, and without noticing because of the fun they are having, students learn biology, chemistry, and physics. The camp is operated by the Fraternal Order of Alaska State Troopers.
www.adn.com/crime/story/437803.html

DNA Evidence Gains Acceptance as a Key Tool in Robbery Cases
The Wall Street Journal, (06/19/2008), Gautam Naik

DNA evidence more commonly used for serious offenses like rape or murder is now being considered as an option for helping to solve property crimes. However, the down side to what seems to be an effective tool is the cost associated with such analysis. Analysis may be or can be more than some jurisdictions can afford. A five-city pilot project funded by the National Institute of
Justice indicated that DNA evidence can have a powerful and positive affect on property crime investigations. According to Steve Allison of the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center at Denver University, "People committing serious crimes usually start on smaller ones. So through this process you can get these people identified and in the system earlier." This concept is now new in Great Britain, which has embraced a broader use of DNA evidence, and because of the results the U.S. Department of Justice funded this five-city project.
online.wsj.com/article_email/SB121384113207187445-lMyQjAxMDI4MTEzOTgxNDkxWj.html

Tracking the Event Horizon
Corrections.com, (06/17/2008), Ann Coppola

The 9th Annual Innovative Technologies for Community Corrections conference highlighted the latest innovations in tools for offender monitoring, as well as risk assessment and testing, but it also showcased tools and
technology not yet available to practitioners. Conference attendees involved in various aspects of community corrections came from several foreign countries and 44 U.S. States. One technology on display was hybrid GPS tracking that incorporated cellular communications to ensure indoor tracking and monitoring. The conference sponsor, the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center-Rocky Mountain, introduced the newest version of Field Search and discussed the future release of a Macintosh compatible version. Of particular note was the increase in law enforcement attendees. Agencies are seeing advantages to working with those in the community corrections field due to the information produced as a result of offender monitoring.
www.corrections.com/news/article/18816

Pistol Cam: When Cops Draw This Point-and-Shoot, Say Cheese
Wired.com, (06/23/2008), Vince Beiser

The
SWAT team of the Orange County (New York) Sheriff's Office has recently begun using the PistolCam. The PistolCam is a small device, combining a video camera, a flashlight, and a laser sight, that attaches to the underside of a gun barrel. The camera begins recording when the gun is drawn and can store an hour of video. Developed by Legend Technologies, the PistolCam is priced at $695.
www.wired.com/gadgets/miscellaneous/magazine/16-07/st_pistolcams

Wednesday, July 09, 2008

Case Organization and Presentation Training Program

The Computer, Financial and Intelligence Division (CFI) of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, Glynco, Ga is sponsoring the Case Organization and Presentation Training Program (COPTP).

CFI has been actively monitoring the development of computer software that can assist criminal investigators to electronically organize and manage complex cases. Over the past few years, incredible strides have been made which allow the investigator to collect, store and retrieve information and evidence electronically through the use of specialized computer applications originally designed for the business community. This same digitized data can be used to create visually informative records and charts for use in investigative team briefings and/or presentations to a prosecutor or jury.

More importantly, the gradual transformation of the courtroom from traditional to high-tech is changing the way cases are presented. The new "Computer Integrated Courtroom" permits judicial participants to electronically present their evidence in a more efficient and expedient manner through the use of computers, monitors and document cameras.
Evidence presented at trial or to a grand jury can now be highlighted or enlarged for a more thorough review by the jury or adjudicating official. Criminal Investigators must stay abreast of these changes in order to remain at the forefront in the fight against crime.

COPTP will continue to change and evolve with each offering based on the innovation of computer technology trends. The goal of this program is to provide students with the ability to identify and select the case organizational tools best suited for their particular needs and to be skillful in successfully presenting their findings in an effective and professional manner.

Length: The COPTP is a five (5) day program. It begins on Monday and ends on Friday at noon of the same week.

Curriculum
Major Case Management
Prosecutors' Perspective
Case Organization and Excel Spreadsheets Database Inventories Emerging Software Electronic Courtroom RFFlow Drawing Software Integrating Audio and Video in Case Presentation Digital Evidence Creating Link Analysis Using PowerPoint Creating Timelines Scanning and OCR Electronic Bates Stamp and Bar-coding Documents Database Options for Case Organization - Investigative File Inventory Student Presentations

Students will be evaluated by the creation and presentation of a case using skills and technology taught in the program. A sample case is provided, but Students are encouraged to bring current or past case materials to use in the preparation of their case.

Prerequisites for Attendance
The participant needs to have basic computer skills prior to enrolling in this program.

The next progrma is in Houston, TX from August 18, 2008 to August 22, 2008. For more information contact Mike Darnell @ (912) 267-2377 or via mike.darnell@dhs.gov

Hello all

Hello everyone. I am Bryan Heger, a retired Sergeant from Anne Arundel County Maryland. I am new to this blog and just wanted to say hello to everyone on it.

Tuesday, July 08, 2008

Advanced Criminal Investigative Analysis Course

The Scottsdale Police Department in Arizona will host an Advanced Criminal Investigative Analysis Course from August 18th thru 22nd. The course will be presented by Phoebe L. Kelsoe, Ph.D. of the Alpha Group Center for Crime and Intelligence Analysis Training, and may also fulfill your state's peace officer commission (POST, TCLOSE, etc.) requirements for continuing education or training hours.

Designed primarily for investigators and crime analysts who are responsible for investigating or assisting in the investigation of homicide, in-class projects also deal with the crime of rape. Other relevant issues are examined as well. For example, you will learn how to identify the personality and behavioral characteristics of the victim and the offender in child abductions, how to identify the physical, behavioral, and personality characteristics of offenders who attack and kill elderly women, and how to analyze information contained in police reports to actually develop a profile that describes the type of offender who most likely committed the crime.

Each participant will receive a copy of the "Advanced Criminal Investigative Analysis Study Guide and Workbook." This manual provides numerous pages of class notes and supplemental reading material that will be used extensively throughout the course, and a copy of "Case Management for Missing Children Homicide Investigation." This booklet provides a wealth of information about offenders who commit child homicides, their victims, crime scene patterns, violent acts, and their motivations for committing such violent crimes. Tuition for the course is $525 and includes the week of instruction, the text, and all related course materials.

To obtain a course brochure or to register for the course, please contact Det. Jennifer Paxson at the Scottsdale Police Department, 10225 E. Via Linda, Scottsdale, AZ 85258; by phone at (480) 312-6318, by fax at (480) 312-9018, or by e-mail at jpaxson@scottsdaleaz.gov. Additional information about the content of the course can also be found on the Alpha Group website at www.alphagroupcenter.com.

The Shang Pirate Legacy

July 8, 2008, (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. Jerry Ardolino, a former Chicago Police Department police officer, will be signing copies of his latest book: The Shang Pirate Legacy.

Date: July 19 and 20, 2008
Time: 1PM to 4PM
Location: Borders Book Store, 10950 Charleston Road,
Las Vegas, NV

The Shang Pirate Legacy is a historically based action-thriller. It is the first novel written about the Chinese Pirate ship Ning Po and her Triad Pirate crew whose descendents are 21st Century, Asian Triad Gangsters. According to the book description, “If you love pirates; high-tech suspense; realistic action and a complex yet thrilling plot along with subplots, twists and turns - you’ll love The Shang Pirate Legacy.”

Because of its historical accuracy and research, The Shang Pirate Legacy is in the permanent library collections of The Catalina Island Museum; The
Los Angeles Maritime Museum; Newport Harbor Nautical Museum and in the J. Porter Shaw Library collection at The San Francisco Maritime National Park.

Jerry Ardolino’s first book, Extreme Cop: Chicago PD “is the true story of Jerry Ardolino, the wildest, most violent cop in the history of the Chicago Police Department and that would mean: in the history of the world. Jerry Ardolino is the book’s author and it is the first true, full-length on-going story about the Chicago Police written by an insider. It has never been done before. Jerry Ardolino was a star-carrying member of that horde of hard-edged cops; the largest and deadliest “gang” in Chicago or anyplace else. The gang in midnight-blue leather police jackets who had the tools and the talent that enabled them to become known throughout the world, as the most violent, corrupt, out-of-control and; toughest police force ever to stalk the streets.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 1025
police officers (representing 431 police departments) and their 2182 criminal justice books in 33 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Sunday, July 06, 2008

Become a Police Officer

June 13, 2008, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) On July 11, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with Lieutenant Barry Baker, Baltimore Police Department (ret.), on how to become a police officer.

Program Date: July 11, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic:
Become a Police Officer
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/07/12/Become-a-Police-Officer

About the Guest
Detective Lieutenant
Barry Baker retired from the Baltimore Police Department in 2004. During his thirty-two year career, Barry Baker served as a patrol officer, sergeant, and lieutenant, as well as a special operations lieutenant and detective lieutenant. Lieutenant Barry Baker is the author of Becoming a Police Officer: An Insider's Guide to a Career in Law Enforcement.

According to
Barry Baker’s book, Becoming a Police Officer: An Insider’s Guide to a Career in Law Enforcement “is a serious examination of police work that is directed toward young people who are contemplating a career as a police officer. Author Barry Baker draws on over thirty-two years of experience from some of the most violent streets of any city in the United States to show you the unembellished truths of law enforcement.

Barry Baker describes the self-satisfaction that can be found in police work while identifying its pitfalls and how to avoid them. Before ending his career as a detective lieutenant, Baker spent his first twenty years on the force as a patrol officer, making him uniquely qualified to speak from a breadth and depth of experience.

Becoming a Police Officer: An Insider’s Guide to a Career in
Law Enforcement covers topics a newly trained police officer must appreciate—and master—to ensure success and safety, including the following: Self-evaluation for a police career; Recognizing and ignoring bad advice; Rapid advancement toward self-sufficiency; The immeasurable importance of integrity; and, Matters of life and death.

Becoming a
Police Officer: An Insider’s Guide to a Career in Law Enforcement is a valuable insight for those seeking a career in the honorable and important profession of law enforcement.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530