Criminal Justice News

Wednesday, November 26, 2008

Public Safety Technology in the News

Homeland Security and Justice Departments Providing More Info to Local Officers
The National Ledger, (11/16/2008), Jim Kouri

The U.S. Departments of
Homeland Security (DHS) and Justice (DOJ) have enhanced their biometric systems to improve information sharing with state and local agencies. The changes improve interoperability between the Automated Biometric Identification System (IDENT) and the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS). To target criminal aliens, a new database link can automatically check the criminal and immigration history of individuals incarcerated by local and state law enforcement. IDENT and IAFIS interoperability is key to Secure Communities, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's comprehensive plan to identify criminal aliens in local communities. Seven sites nationwide have participated in a pilot version of interoperability between the DHS and DOJ databases. The Customs agency plans to expand this capability to more than 50 state and local law enforcement agencies by next spring.
www.nationalledger.com/artman/publish/article_272623792.shtml

New
Police Car Scans License Plates, Sniffs Out Bombs
ABC News, (11/15/2008), Patrik Jonnsson

law enforcement professionals attending the International Association of Police Chiefs' annual meeting in November got their first look at a "purpose-built" Police Car. The Carbon E7 is a 300-horspower car that runs on biodiesel fuel. It is equipped with sensors for weapons of mass destruction and automatic license-plate scanners. Carbon Motors would need to sell about 20,000 cars to U.S. law enforcement agencies to warrant its proposed 2010 production run. In designing the vehicle, the company included ideas gleaned from law enforcement officers, including a "hoseable" rear seat, an extra-wide driver's seat into a cockpit-style front compartment and side emergency lights to increase visibility and safety. The vehicle sticker price has not yet been announced.
abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=6254509&page=1

Improved Measurements Could Mean Safer, More Reliable Electroshock Weapons
ScienceDaily, (11/14/2008)

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and
Technology (NIST) are working toward a standard method for assessing the electrical output of electroshock weapons. In recent years, conducted-energy devices such as stun guns have become popular among law enforcement agencies as less-lethal weapons. Questions have been raised about whether the devices can contribute to or cause death in some individuals. Groups such as Amnesty International have called for guidelines that include "threshold exposures," which are the minimum level that would incapacitate different groups of people without putting them at risk for injury or death. However, current reports on the voltage the weapons deliver are inconsistent. NIST scientists have developed methods for calibrating the high-voltage and current measurement probes used by industry. More research is needed, but eventually NIST will work with government agencies and the law enforcement community to standardize the method that ! will facilitate establishment of user guidelines.
www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081113140420.htm

Crime Cartography
The Diamondback, (11/11/2008), Kyle Goon

Police at the University of Maryland will soon be able to directly contribute crime data to the crime-mapping Web site www.UCrime.com. UCrime relies on police departments, newspapers, user reports and university incident logs to find crime data and plot it on a Google map. Crimes are classified by category and include descriptions of what happened. University police want to upload the university's crime information for crime mapping purposes.
media.www.diamondbackonline.com/media/storage/paper873/news/2008/11/10/News/Crime.Cartography-3536238.shtml

Californian Prisons Employ Robotic Scouts
Gizmag, (11/04/2008)

California's Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation has agreed to test remote-controlled surveillance robots. Roughly 250 of the 1.2-pound Recon Scouts are used by
law enforcement agencies in the United States and military personnel in Iraq. Ten robots will be tested in California prisons. During hostile prison situations, the robots can be thrown into place or fired from a tear-gas launcher. They can survive a 30-foot drop onto concrete and can be operated from up to 100 feet away using a handheld controller, which displays footage from the robot. The robots cost $6,000 ($9,000 with an infrared camera).
www.gizmag.com/californian-prisons-employ-robotic-scouts/10306/

States Complete Radiation Detection Drill
Global Security Newswire, (11/07/2008)

Nine states and the District of Columbia recently completed a practice exercise to test their ability to cope with a nuclear or radiological attack. The exercise, which ran several days, tested the coordination capabilities in the southeastern region of the United States. The exercise was the end result of the Southeast Transportation Corridor Pilot Program, which emphasized training, improved communications
Technology and emergency protocols to improve regional nuclear detection and response capabilities.
www.globalsecuritynewswire.org/gsn/nw_20081107_5287.php

BMV Joins Identity Theft Fight
Indianapolis Star, (11/07/2008), Gretchen Becker

An Indiana agency is testing face-recognition
Technology for driver's licenses to help fight identity theft. The Bureau of Motor Vehicles will test the Technology at three of its Indianapolis branches as part of a pilot program. A $2.4 million software program scans the millions of photos in the database to determine if a photo is on a different credential with a different name. The software looks for matching points on the face, such as the distance between pupils, and compares those to other images with the same data points. The system reports any suspect names and faces. About 20 states are using the Technology.
www.indystar.com/article/20081107/LOCAL/811070442

Wichita Falls Unified Command Post is Ready for Operation
Texomas, (11/14/08), Sara DiMuro

The city of
Wichita Falls, Texas, has a new rolling command center to help cope up close with long-term situations such as standoffs, environmental hazards and weather disasters. The $400,000 center, which was funded with federal grant money, is available for use across north Texas. The unit has full telephone and dispatch capability, infrared night vision and a camera mounted on the top.
texomashomepage.com/content/fulltext/?cid=22831

New
Technology in Bonneville Co. Will Help Find Missing Children
KPVI-TV, (10/31/08), Andrew Del Greco

The Bonneville County Sheriff's Office in Idaho is the latest jurisdiction to obtain iris scan
Technology as a tool to locate lost children. The sheriff's office will share the Technology with other agencies in the state. Should an adult or child go missing, if their eyes have been scanned their identification can be sent digitally across the United States. Young children may not know their names or phone numbers and can be identified with an iris scan. Thirty-five states currently use the Technology.
www.kpvi.com/Global/story.asp?S=9276017

Green Prisons Farm, Recycle to Save Energy, Money
Associated Press, (11/01/08), Phuong Le

Corrections facilities are discovering the benefits of going green. Prison officials find that using inmates to keep bees, recycle, and grow organic vegetables reduces costs, lowers the impact on the environment and provides inmates with new skills. Agencies are replacing old appliances with energy-efficient ones and installing solar panels. Because of a water shortage this summer, inmates in the North Carolina's prison system converted 50-gallon pickle barrels into small cisterns to capture rainwater. The green practices instituted by the Cedar Creek Corrections Center in Washington state has resulted in the facility using 250,000 fewer gallons of water a year and saving $6,000 to $8,400 annually on garbage bills.
ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5gW-MYyvVx600Ql2nvH6z6Ybk9yJQD946B0CO0

Friday, November 14, 2008

Call for Presenters: National Law Enforcement & Corrections Technology Center

10th Annual Innovative Technologies for
Community Corrections Conference
June 1-3, 2009
San Diego, CA

Is your agency involved in a
technology project that is worthy of attention? Would you like to be a part of the 2009 Innovative Technologies for Community Corrections Conference agenda? The NLECTC is pleased to issue a call for presenters for the 2009 conference.

Presentations should relate to the implementation of
technology to solve an operational problem and/or management issues related to technology. Conference workshops are 90 minutes in length and are generally organized in four tracks:

Electronic Monitoring
Drug and Alcohol Testing
Information
technology
Management Issues - (e.g. Training, Officer Safety, Communications, etc.)

Submission Guidelines
Persons interested in submitting a proposal for consideration should forward the following:

Workshop title
A clear, concise, accurate, description of the workshop
Complete contact information for each speaker
Brief biography of each of the speakers
Audio/Visual requirements for the presentation
Primary contact person for the workshop

Presentation proposals may be e-mailed no later than December 31, 2008 to:
Joe Russo, Assistant Director
National
Law Enforcement & Corrections technology Center
E-mail: jrusso@du.edu

The NLECTC will provide for the expenses for all speakers (up to two per workshop) selected to present a workshop at the 2009 conference to include airfare, one nights lodging, ground transportation and per diem. In addition, conference registration fees will be waived. NLECTC will not cover expenses for presenters representing vendors.

Soldiers Treat Ailing Iraqis

By Army Staff Sgt. James Hunter

Special to American Forces Press Service

Nov. 13, 2008 - When Multinational Division Baghdad soldiers from the 1st Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, first arrived in Iraq in November 2007, they had many things in mind to help to improve the lives of the citizens in Rathwaniyah, just on the outskirts of Baghdad. The soldiers wanted to provide medical assistance, but there was no clinic in the area available to the Iraqi citizens. So the soldiers made it their mission to establish one.

"It's a farm area, very rural, that has some sectarian division," said Army Capt. Jerry Braverman, a physician assistant from Roseburg, Ore., with the 1st Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment. "When we got here, our mission was to establish this new clinic next to the school and try to set Dr. Abass up for success to be able to independently work free of [the] Ministry of Health, with the long-term goal of getting Ministry of Health doctors and nurses to come out here and assist with the care for the area."

In the meantime, while the facility was being built, the "Top Gun" troops pushed out into the area and held six combined medical engagements, working side by side with Iraqi physicians to treat ailing Iraqis.

At the last medical operation in Rathwaniyah on Nov. 8, soldiers and Iraqi doctors treated about 350 Iraqis in the new medical facility. They treated a variety of illnesses such as upper respiratory infections, sore throats, skin rashes, muscle aches and asthma, Braverman said, and even were able to take care of a few minor tooth problems.

Braverman has been active in engaging the Iraqi physicians, and said he has found these medical engagements rewarding on many fronts.

"For me, it's very rewarding, especially with the kids," he said. "The kids know you by name; they know exactly who you are."

Recently, he said, one child approached him and said when he grows up he wants to be a doctor just like him. Braverman said the soldiers are having a great impact on the children, the sheiks and the local council, who all appreciate what they have done to aid the community.

This medical engagement also provided an opportunity for the soldiers' replacements, from the 1st Infantry Division's 1st Battalion, 7th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Heavy Brigade Combat Team, to meet the Iraqi physicians and see first-hand the medical problems many of the citizens face.

Army Capt. Quintin Treadway, a physician assistant from Osceola, Neb., with the 1st Battalion, 7th Field Artillery Regiment, said he is looking forward to the next year and engaging many of Iraqi physicians in the area.

He wants to continue these medical engagements, he said. "I think it engenders a lot of trust within the local people as they see us out there to help them," he explained, "and I think it's the most visible and hands-on way of engendering that trust, because we are actually placing hands on to heal someone. [Medical engagements help to] develop rapport with the local population."

Just as the Top Gun troops have done for the last year, Treadway said he is keen to treat medical conditions and help the Iraqis avoid future ailments through preventive medicine. As his medics hit the streets daily on patrols, he said, he is eager to have them do all they can to help the people, no matter how severe the case.

"I expect my medics ... to assist with what they can with the children out on the streets," he said. "A medic told me the other day a young kid had come up with a pretty good-size cut on his hand, and he bandaged it there on the spot."

Treadway said he wants to get the Ministry of Health more involved with the clinic by providing new equipment, doctors and nurses or supplies, because the clinic plays a vital role within the community.

The clinic, which Braverman describes as one of the best facilities in the area, is treating up to a dozen people a day, on average. It has proved successful since its opening, he said, as Abass, the doctor running the clinic, now can purchase his own supplies in addition to what the government normally provides. However, Braverman said, the clinic is limited in what it can do for the Iraqi people.

Abass said he hopes to add a lab and an X-ray machine, but in the meantime will do all he can with what he has to ensure the good health of his neighbors.

(Army Staff Sgt. James Hunter serves in Multinational Division Baghdad with the 101st Airborne Division's 2nd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs Office.)

Monday, November 10, 2008

Interdiction Seizures: Dope Vs. Cash

When teaching interdiction I am often asked the question about “which side of the highway do I work, the dope side or the money side?” For those reading that are unfamiliar with this let’s explain the phrase. Interdiction officers typically work a major highway that is a drug route. For example, in Texas, dopers travel southbound into the state from northern states carrying large amounts of cash for the dope purchase, either in Texas or Mexico, depending on where there connection is. This is what we refer to as the “money side” of the highway.

READ ON
www.police-writers.com/articles/hawkes_interdiction_seizures.html

Friday, November 07, 2008

REQUEST for INFORMATION – RFI

This is a REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) only. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is developing an equipment standard for vehicular digital recording systems used by law enforcement to record events in and around patrol cars. NIJ provides objective, independent, evidence-based knowledge and tools to enhance the administration of Justice and public safety. NIJ does not intend to award a contract on the basis of this RFI or to otherwise pay for information received in response to this RFI.

This RFI is issued solely to solicit technical input from Industry (i.e., manufacturers and testing laboratories) for consideration by NIJ as it develops a performance standard for vehicular digital recording systems. No product demonstrations or marketing presentations will be scheduled as a result of this research/information gathering announcement. Specifically, through this RFI, NIJ seeks to gather test methodologies and performance requirements that Industry representatives feel should be included in the standard currently being developed, along with the rationale for these suggestions. These include test methodologies and performance requirements that address, but are not limited to, camera and audio device functions; safety; and recording, transfer, and security of video and audio. If a test method being suggested is currently in use, NIJ is interested in learning why that particular method and applicable parameters were chosen and what information the test results provide.

Responses to this RFI should be submitted no later than November 24, 2008 in order to ensure full consideration. The narrative section of your response (summary of recommendations) should not exceed 7 double-spaced pages. Company information, abstract, table of contents, charts, figures, appendices, and data and information supporting the recommendations, do not count toward the 7-page limit for the narrative section. Responses should be sent via overnight express mail or e-mail attachment to the contact person below, and include the vendor's company name, address, point of contact name, e-mail address, and telephone number. Any proprietary or company confidential information provided in the response must be clearly marked on every applicable page of the response provided.

Point of Contact: Casandra Robinson
Mailing Address: NIJ, 810 7th Street NW, Washington DC 20531
Email Address: Casandra.robinson@usdoj.gov

Communicating Across State and County Lines: The Piedmont Regional Voice over Internet Protocol Project

To officers in the Danville (Va.) Police Department, sometimes it seemed like suspects knew a little too much geography. When being pursued, suspects would head straight for the state line, and in just a few minutes, speed into North Carolina. Because of incompatible radio systems, Danville officers unfortunately had no way to communicate directly with their colleagues across the border, complicating efforts to arrest the suspects.

To fix the problem and help improve public safety, the City of Danville teamed up with surrounding law enforcement agencies — the Caswell County Sheriff's Office in North Carolina, the
North Carolina State Highway Patrol, the Pittsylvania County Sheriff's Office in Virginia and the Virginia State Police — to use Internet technology to bridge the gaps in their communications systems

READ ON
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/journals/261/piedmont-voip.htm

Cold Cases: Resources for Agencies, Resolution for Families

It is 1974. The body of an 8-year-old girl who has been sexually assaulted has been found in a wooded area next to the park. The girl was last seen alive earlier that morning, leaving her house for school. Fast forward to 2008. The case file and evidence sit in storage at a local police department. The case — never solved — continues to take a back seat to more recent cases. The family of the little girl waits and wonders if there will ever be resolution.

Every day across the U.S., investigations slow or stop completely, and cases go "cold." Police agencies often lack the manpower, equipment and funding to support units dedicated to investigating and analyzing these cold cases. Homicide and sexual assault units are backlogged with active cases. Consequently, cold cases rarely get the attention they deserve.

READ ON
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/journals/260/cold-case-resources.htm

'Internationalizing' Criminal Justice Research

When the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) set out to develop updated standards for portable X-ray equipment used by bomb squads, British scientists and engineers did most of the work. "Explosives have no nationality," said Chris Tillery, associate deputy director for science and technology at NIJ. “Most countries have the same concerns.”

Because NIJ has close contact with the British Home Office Scientific Development Branch, officials on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean knew that American and British
law enforcement agencies were independently working on similar projects. This contact made it possible for the American effort to leverage the considerable experience and expertise developed by the British over decades. The collaboration is a good example of how international efforts can ultimately help U.S. state and local law enforcement agencies.

READ ON
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/journals/260/internationalizing.htm

Thursday, November 06, 2008

PROSECUTOR WISHES RAPIST WELL

By James H. Lilley

Eugene A. Marriott raped, sodomized and brutally beat a woman outside a Best Western Motel in Fairfax City on January 14, 2006. He was pulling up his pants, with the woman still lying at his feet, when police arrived and arrested him. An eyewitness to the crime said he was in an adjacent parking lot and saw Marriott standing over top of the woman and, “just pounding away on her.” He yelled at Marriott, but he continued his attack on the woman.


Marriott, who is married, is also a minister in The Ebenezer African Methodist Episcopal Church in Fort Washington. After his arrest he told detectives investigating the case that he’d dated the woman and what happened on January 14th was simply a matter of their sadomasochistic role-playing. The woman, however, told detectives they’d broken up weeks earlier. But, during the course of his interview with police he admitted that even if it had been role-playing that what he did that night was wrong.

Marriott entered a plea to charges of abduction with intent to defile and unlawful wounding, with the abduction with intent charge carrying a minimum sentence of 20 years. With his agreement to plead to those charges, prosecutors dismissed the rape and sodomy counts. But during trial proceedings prosecutors amended the charges to simple adduction, which carried no minimum sentence and a maximum of 10 years. They also added two misdemeanor sexual battery charges, to which Marriott agreed to plead guilty.

By pleading guilty to the two misdemeanor charges he escaped having to register as a sex offender, which would have been required by the “intent to defile” charge.

Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Toni Fay presented the case and said that what happened that night was
criminal behavior, and showed photos of the victim to Circuit Court Judge Stanley Klein. Pictures offered into evidence showed that the victim had sustained cuts and bruises over her body from her lower legs to the top of her head. The victim said that she’d been beaten with fists and a belt buckle, raped and sexually assaulted. But, according to the Washington Post, Fay concluded her case by saying, “I wish Mr. Marriott well. I hope that his wife takes him back. I am very glad to see his church and his community are still supporting him.”

I’m surprised that she didn’t invite him out for dinner and drinks. Perhaps I missed something in the translation of all of this, but I was under the impression that Eugene A. Marriott was the accused in this instance, not the victim. Yet, it seems that the Fairfax County Prosecutor’s Office, or at least Toni Fay, went out of her way to assist him in eluding prosecution for the most serious crimes.

Marriott’s capacity as a minister at the Ebenezer AME Church doesn’t entitle him to preferential treatment when he stands accused of a serious crime, or any crime for that matter. He said he was sorry, but showed no emotion when he apologized. He went on to say that he’d lost everything he’d worked his whole life for, but continued to have the support of his church and his wife. The victim admitted she had dated him for about three months and their break up had been amicable. Although the victim dated her attacker for a time and agreed to meet him to go dancing on the night of the attack, it doesn’t qualify him for leniency. Indeed the court saw otherwise and sentenced him to only 16 months for his crimes immediately after sentencing two burglars to 18 and 20 months in prison. First, the prosecutor slaps the victim across the face by wishing her attacker well, and then the court puts its stamp of approval on the slap with a kick in the stomach and a sentence of only 16 months for a violent crime. Yet, Judge Klein said Marriott’s behavior wouldn’t be tolerated.

I don’t understand how a brutal beating and rape warrants less time in prison than a property crime. What was the court saying not only to the victim in this case, but also to the thousands of victims of rape and sexual assault across the country? Was the court sending a message that forcibly violating a woman’s body will get a suspect less jail time than a break in of a home or business?


Like it or not, there are many times when there is no real justice for the victim in the judicial system. But in this case far more went on behind the scenes than anyone was aware of. Toni Fay reduced the charges without consulting with the victim, the detective who investigated the allegations or her boss, Commonwealth’s Attorney Robert F. Horan.

The victim had already agreed with a deal struck by the prosecutor that Marriott would plead guilty to abduction with intent to defile and should have been consulted by Fay prior to any change in that deal. According to Mr. Horan, and anyone familiar with the justice system knows contacting the victim regarding any changes to the agreement is rule number one. Horan said the original plea agreement made sense and that lawyers who have defended accused rapists agreed, as did the victim in this instance.

Some time before the hearing, Marriott’s attorney, Bobby Stafford, contacted Fay and told her that Marriott did not want to have to register as a sex offender, which would have been required under the “intent to defile” charge. Fay was then in touch with Judge Klein, telling him that she and Stafford had been in contact to resolve the matter, but without informing him of just what that matter was. But at the time of sentencing neither the judge nor the attorneys made mention of the fact that the charges had been altered.

The 35-year-old victim in this case said she was shocked to learn that the charges had been reduced without notifying her, and was further angered by the lenient sentence. Her outrage was supported by May Lou Leary, executive director of the National Center for Victims of Crime. Leary said that when offenders are allowed to avoid responsibility for their crimes it has an effect on all victims, and especially victims of sex crimes. Sexual assault is a violent crime that is about domination and control of the victim, and what happened in this case reinforces that.

In some ways Judge Klein’s hands were tied when he sentenced Marriott, but if he wanted to give the victim some measure of satisfaction and justice he had options available to him. At sentencing he ordered Marriott to serve four years on each of the abduction and unlawful wounding counts, but then suspended all but 16 months of the terms. He then passed six-month sentences down on the two sexual battery counts and ordered all time to be served concurrently. If he so desired, he could have ordered those sentences to be served consecutively in lieu of concurrently and Marriott would have been given at least nine years behind bars. Still, even the nine years would have been a far cry from the minimum of 20 demanded by the abduction with intent to defile charge.

There was a grave miscarriage of justice in this case and another black eye for the judicial system as a whole. Commonwealth’s Attorney Robert Horan, who has always seemed to be a cut above when it came to fairness throughout the judicial process, is now faced with having to conduct damage control to repair the harm done to the reputation of his office.

Still, what happened in this case leaves me, and I’m certain hundreds of others, wondering just went on behind the scenes to cause such a lucrative deal to be struck. The flag of suspicion should be waving, and rightly so, because of the actions of Defense Attorney Bobby Stafford and Commonwealth’s Attorney Toni Fay. There are many questions in this case and I’m certain that Mr. Horan will live up to his reputation for fairness and honesty and demand the answers. Unfortunately, the damage has already been done to Mr. Horan’s office and not only the victim in this case, but also the countless other victims across the country have been slapped in the face.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
James H. Lilley is a former Marine and Police Sergeant with the Howard County Police Department (Maryland). He worked in the Uniformed Patrol Division, criminal Investigations Division, Forensic Services (CSI) and Drug Enforcement Division. His Street Drug Unit was featured in the book "Undercover" by Hans Halberstadt and published by Simon and Schuster. Some of his awards include The Medal of Valor, Four Bronze Stars, Four Unit Citations and the Governor's Citation. He is also an 8th Degree Black Belt in Shorin Ryu Karate and the first American to be promoted to the rank of Black Belt by Mr. Takeshi Miyagi. James H. Lilley is the author of six books: A Question of Honor; The Eyes of the Hunter; The Far Side of the Bridge; Just Retribution; A Miracle for Tony Clements; and, Death Knocks Twice.

MORE ABOUT JAMES H. LILLEY
http://www.police-writers.com/james_lilley.html

Wednesday, November 05, 2008

Life Coach

The November 21, 2008, program of the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with former Ontario Provincial Police Officer Julie Hryniewicz-Hache who is an author, speaker, trainer and life coach; “If you are looking to achieve goals or overcome self-imposed limitations, Julie is a Certified Coach Practitioner, with the Certified Coaches Federation, Julie will support and guide you towards the life goals you are looking to achieve.”

Program Date: November 21, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Life Coach
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/11/22/Life-Coach

About the Guest
Julie Hryniewicz-Hache is an inspirational speaker, life coach, author, and corporate trainer in the realm work/life balance and wellness. As former Ontario Provincial Police Officer in five separate Northern Ontario detachments, some of Julie's specialty positions included Hostage and Crisis Negotiator, Acting Detective Sergeant, Investigator with the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario, and Casino Intelligence Liaison officer.

Following her policing career, Julie became a college level instructor in the Police Foundations and
Criminal Justice Program. Using her experience in policing and as a front-line social service worker in child protective services, with young offenders, and facilitating social skills programs in homeless shelters, soup kitchens, and low income housing complexes, Julie shares her journey of burnout and healing with others as a writer of magazine articles, columnist, host of a community online talk radio show, author of a book titled, "Natural Balance" as well as the audio CD program, "What Happened To My Tires?" on life balance.

Julie Hryniewicz-Hache is a graduate of the University of Western Ontario with an Honors Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology, with criminology studies from Lake Superior State University in Michigan towards her degree, as well as a Law Clerk diploma from the Ontario business college. Julie was recently a selected participant of the two-and-a-half week, 2008 Governor General's Canadian Leadership Conference. For further information about Julie, her work, and her inspirational blog, you can visit her website at: www.MakeItWorkSeminars.com.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/11/22/Life-Coach

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Tuesday, November 04, 2008

American Heroes Story Contest

Law enforcement, fire, military and other emergency services personnel are our American Heroes. Did one of your parents, a sibling, a friend or even an anonymous American Hero touch your life? Who is your American Hero and what is their story? American Heroes Press is looking for the best stories about our heroes. You don't have to be a member of the law enforcement, fire, military or emergency services community to enter. You simply need to share your story concerning these unique individuals – whether funny, compelling or truly life-altering

The contest launches Nov. 3, 2008. We will accept submissions through Jan. 31, 2009. Winners will be announced April 1, 2009.

Grand Prize
One Grand-Prize-winning story will be selected. The author of the story will receive the following prizes:

Choice of $200 cash, or $250 credit toward an American Heroes Publishing package
Featured spot for his/her Grand-Prize winning story in the contest anthology
Printed and bound copy of the finished anthology

Runner-Up
One Runner-Up-winning story will be selected. The author of the story will receive the following prizes:

Choice of $100 cash, or $150 credit toward an American Heroes Publishing package
Featured spot for his/her Runner-Up winning story in the contest anthology
Printed and bound copy of the finished anthology

Finalists
Fifteen Finalist stories will be selected. Each finalist author will receive the following prizes:

Inclusion of his/her winning story in the contest anthology
Printed and bound copy of the finished anthology

All participants will be eligible to receive an electronic copy of the finished anthology.

CLICK HERE FOR CONTEST DETAILS

About American Heroes Press
American Heroes Press is more than just a means of publishing your book. It's a growing, active and innovative community of writers. Retired police Lt. Raymond E. Foster of the Los Angeles Police Department started this community in 2003. Today it offers a brand of publishing designed specifically for true American Heroes: police, military, firefighters and emergency workers. As an American Hero, great things are accomplished through teamwork. This community – this team – is here to help you achieve success with your literary work.

More information about American Heroes Press can be found at:
www.americanheroespress.com

Monday, November 03, 2008

Sexual Assault Response Training Tool Available

The Office of Victims of Crime (OVC) Sexual Assault Advocate/Counselor Training (SAACT) downloadable curriculum teaches advocates how to provide effective crisis intervention services to victims and survivors of sexual assault. SAACT is designed primarily for new advocates/counselors who are volunteers or staff at rape crisis centers and for seasoned veterans who may need a refresher course.

Sexual Assault Advocate/Counselor Training (SAACT) teaches advocates about advocacy/counseling, the realities and impact of sexual assault, procedures to follow in common situations, techniques to support recovery, and compassion fatigue and self-care. The 2-day curriculum focuses on intervening with individuals in a crisis rather than long-term and group counseling.

SAACT is designed primarily for new advocates/counselors who are volunteers or staff at rape crisis centers and for seasoned veterans who may need a refresher course. The training also can be useful for nurses (including
Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners) and for physicians, law enforcement officers, and professional counselors who do not have specific sexual assault training. Not only would this latter group benefit from the training, but trainers would benefit from their presence.

VIEW/DOWNLOAD THE TRAINING
https://www.ovcttac.gov/SAACT/index.cfm

Grant Opportunity: Developing and Enhancing Statewide Automated Victim Information and Notification Programs

The Statewide Automated Victim Information and Notification (SAVIN) Program (guided in part by the general principles of 42 USC 10603e) helps protect crime victims from further victimization and ensures their legal rights are upheld by providing registered victims with timely and accurate information about any changes to the status of their offender (e.g., trial dates, times, or changes; probation hearings; inmate relocation; and offender release). This information enables victims to fully participate in the judicial process while maintaining total anonymity.

Applicants are limited to state government agencies authorized to manage the planning and implementation of a SAVIN program. Indian tribes also are eligible to receive grant funding for the planning and implementation of a SAVIN program.

MORE INFORMATION

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/BJA/grant/09SAVINsol.pdf

Sunday, November 02, 2008

Law Enforcement Intelligence Operations

On November 7, 2008, Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with Captain Franks S. Root, Arizona Department of Public Safety (ret.) on law enforcement intelligence operations.

Program Date: November 7, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic:
Law Enforcement Intelligence Operations
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/11/08/Law-Enforcement-Intelligence-Operations

About the Guest
Frank S. Root has more than 35 years in law enforcement and intelligence operations with special emphasis on complex intelligence investigations organization and case management. During his law enforcement career he worked for the Arizona Department of Public Safety (20 years, retired as Captain); San Luis Obispo Sheriff’s Office (Automation and Crime Analysis Unit); and, State of California, Division of Investigation (conducting criminal investigations involving identity theft, insurance, and consumer fraud)

Frank S. Root is the author of Law Enforcement Intelligence Critical Elements which “is described as a publication designed to demonstrate how to identify, develop, and deliver the various intelligence-related products and services required to effectively support law enforcement intelligence and operational managers at each management level within an agency.”

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2008/11/08/Law-Enforcement-Intelligence-Operations

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530