Criminal Justice News

Friday, January 30, 2009

Measuring Justice: Justice Sector Evaluation & Human Rights

A conference by the International Human Rights Network

Date: Friday 26th June 2009
Venue: National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Ireland

Purpose
Measuring justice is a priority for a wide range of individuals and institutions. It is central to enhancing good governance including rule of law, combating corruption, addressing impunity and building effective, accountable justice sector reform. The purpose of this IHRN conference is to facilitate the pooling of evaluation experience, to identify best practice and lessons for the future, with particular reference to measuring human rights impact.

Format
The day will combine plenary panel discussions with sub-group sessions on selected themes. Discussion will be facilitated by an IHRN concept paper circulated in advance.

Topics
Plenary discussions and sub-group sessions will explore a range of topics in light of the interface between best practice evaluation and human rights based approaches.

Abstracts are invited for sub-group discussions (to a maximum of 500 words) in areas such as the following:

Case studies (potentially transferable lessons from economically developed/developing country contexts; as well as conflict/transitional justice contexts); Institution-specific evaluation (such as police, prosecution, judiciary, corrections) & sectoral approaches; Methodologies & tools (qualitative/ quantitative benchmarks & indicators, Log Frame; Analysis, relationship between sector evaluation & monitoring/oversight functions); and, Cross-cutting issues.

MORE INFORMATION
http://www.ihrnetwork.org/international-conference-2009_231.htm

Tuesday, January 27, 2009

California DOJ invests in 3D crime-scene laser scanners to support forensic crime scene investigation

After seeing first-hand how the Leica Geosystems ScanStation 2 can be deployed to quickly measure and model extensive indoor and outdoor mass casualty mock crime scenes, the California Department of Justice's Bureau of Forensic Services (BFS) moved quickly to purchase two Leica ScanStation 2 high speed, high definition 3D laser scanning systems from Leica Geosystems.

As the scientific arm of the California Attorney General’s Office, BFS forensic scientists collect, analyze, and compare physical evidence from crime scenes or persons for state and local law enforcement agencies, district attorneys, and the courts. The Bureau of Forensic Services operates a network of full-service laboratories in 10 regional services areas in California. Over 45 criminalists will be trained how to use the scanners to gather crime scene data.

Jill Spriggs, Chief of the Department of Justice BFS, says, “The Leica Geosystems Scan Station 2 will provide immediate value for our forensic teams in that they can quickly gather highly accurate data at crime scenes. The Scan Station 2 documents, diagrams and measures the crime scenes prior to evidence being removed from the scene. This is a tremendous time savings for criminalists out in the field. Information gathered from the Scan Station 2 can be used to reconstruct the crime scene later back at the laboratory."

Developed for versatility and productivity, the mobile laser scanner platform is able to collect 50,000 measurements per second enabling crime scene investigators to “freeze the scene in time.” Criminalists will use the Leica ScanStation 2 to photograph and laser scan (measure) a crime scene. An embedded high-resolution digital camera within ScanStation 2 provides detectives with valuable photos of the scene that can be used to aid in scanning and in data processing. Once gathered, the scanning software produces diagrams, scene reconstructions and other important documentation necessary to every crime scene investigation.

Spriggs adds, “Most importantly the scan data has been validated for forensic work and passed admissibility hearings in court."

The California Department of Justice is the third law enforcement agency in California to select the Leica joining the California Highway Patrol and the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department which own eight Leica scanners between them.

“Leica’s 3D laser scanning systems are being adopted by more and more law enforcement agencies who recognize that bringing our scanning technology to bear on a case sends a powerful message to everyone that all possible care is being taken to find the truth,” said Tony Grissim, Forensic Account Manager for Leica Geosystems. “The traffic we are seeing on our forensic web site at http://www.leica-geosystems.com/us/forensic, tells us that interest in our solution is keen, especially since it started being showcased on A&E’s “Crime 360” program. “Crime 360” had the largest audience for a series premiere in A&E history for a criminal justice program.”

The Leica ScanStation 2 can be used for forensic mapping at crash and homicide scenes, officer involved shootings, bomb/arson investigations and can also support a department’s homeland security mission.

Leica Geosystems – when it has to be right
With close to 200 years of pioneering solutions to measure the world, Leica Geosystems products and services are trusted by professionals worldwide to help them capture, analyze, and present spatial information. Leica Geosystems is best known for its broad array of products that capture accurately, model quickly, analyze easily, and visualize and present spatial information.

Those who use Leica Geosystems products every day trust them for their dependability, the value they deliver, and the superior customer support. Based in Heerbrugg, Switzerland, Leica Geosystems is a global company with tens of thousands of customers supported by more than 3’500 employees in 28 countries and hundreds of partners located in more than 120 countries around the world. Leica Geosystems is part of the Hexagon Group, Sweden.

For further information please contact:
Leica Geosystems Inc.
Andre Ribeiro
Director of Marketing
Atlanta, GA 30092
United States
Phone: +1 (770) 326-9557
Fax: +1 (770) 447-0710
Andre.ribeiro@leicaus.com
www.leica-geosystems.us

Monday, January 26, 2009

Surviving Boot Camp

On February 20, 2009, Conversations with Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion Sergeant Michael Volkin, USA, the author of The Ultimate Basic Training Guidebook, on Surviving Boot Camp.

Program Date: February 20, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Surviving Boot Camp
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/02/21/Surviving-Boot-Camp

About the Guest
Sergeant
Michael Volkin is a U.S. Army veteran. He served in Operation Enduring/Iraqi Freedom as a Chemical Operations Specialist and received an Army Commendation Medal for his efforts and for the fitness programs he designed to help his fellow soldiers. He has a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Science from Stephen F. Austin State University in Texas. In addition to being in the Army Reserves, Michael works as a Real Estate Broker in California. Michael Volkin is the author of The Ultimate Basic Training Guidebook.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/02/21/Surviving-Boot-Camp

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Sunday, January 25, 2009

Badge of Life

On February 13, 2009, Conversations with Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion Sergeant Andy O’Hara, California Highway Patrol (ret.), Executive Director of The Badge of Life.

Program Date: February 13, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: The Badge of Life
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/02/14/The-Badge-of-Life

About the Badge of Life
According to The Badge of Life, they “are a group of active and retired
police officers from the United States and Canada who are victims of trauma-related injuries from our law enforcement service. We have suffered the worst that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) brings—the hopelessness, the despair, the flashbacks, the attempts at suicide, the nightmares and insomnia, the panicky hypervigilence, anxiety and terror. Among us are victims of both critical incident and cumulative PTSD.

Our personal experiences are varied and representative of what occurs in police work—shootings, violent attacks, the loss of fellow officers, near-death experiences, helplessly watching the death of a child, and more. We were drawn together out of a determination to help others avoid our fate. With the help of experts in the field like
John Violanti, PhD (author of Police Suicide, Epidemic in Blue and Under the Blue Shadow), Dr. Janak Mehtani, an expert on PTSD and Catherine Leon, LCSW, who has worked extensively with PTSD and law enforcement, we began to set a path.

We found that many departments still lack adequate suicide prevention programs. We found many departments have excellent programs—but limit themselves to suicide awareness and prevention. Our program came after long discussion and research--and the realization that, in the search for complex answers, we were all missing the simple solutions! Thus came about the Badge of Life program--a common sense approach to law enforcement stress and trauma that stunned even us by its utter simplicity.

About the Guest
Sergeant Andy O'Hara,
California Highway Patrol (ret.) is a military veteran and the Executive Director of The Badge of Life. According to Sergeant O’Hara, he “spent his last day of law enforcement sitting on the bedroom floor with his gun, trying to decide whether to shoot himself in the mouth or side of the head. Hospitalized twice with the effects of his post traumatic stress, he has written on this topic and spoken to numerous groups about the importance of this new program. Through those presentations, he has realized how well received and effective the message truly is. He is a member of the California Peer Support Association, the International Police Association and works as a peer volunteer with the West Coast Post-Trauma Retreat.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, law enforcement technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/02/14/The-Badge-of-Life

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Friday, January 23, 2009

Legal History Blog: Fenster on Thurman Arnold's Criminal Law Scholarship

Legal History Blog: Fenster on Thurman Arnold's Criminal Law Scholarship

Tracking Police Suicides 2008

The results were revealing. We found, following necessary adjustments for variables, there were 141 police suicides in the US during 2008. This result is in keeping with current credible research, CDC and NOMS data, and other information available in the field today. Further, testing of our data against blind sources and data gathered by non-media sources, we found solid confirmation of our findings.

READ ON
http://www.criminaljustice-online.com/forum30/1404.html

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Public Safety Technology in the News

New Forensics Lab Planned in Tulsa
The Associated Press, (12/29/2008)

Oklahoma State University in Tulsa will be the site of a multimillion dollar forensic center for use by police and university students. The university medical college will provide $21.87 million of the construction costs. The city will provide $16.86 million. A property and evidence room and a forensic laboratory for use by the Tulsa Police Department will occupy the first two floors of the facility. Police say the additional room will help the department preserve the more than 36,000 items of evidence the police collect each year. Work in the lab includes fingerprint analysis, DNA testing, firearms examination, controlled substance analysis and handwriting analysis.
www.newsok.com/new-forensics-lab-planned-in-tulsa/article/3333771

Economy and Cybercrime Go Hand in Hand
MSNBC, (12/22/2009)

The economic crisis has opened new opportunities for cyber criminals. Spam campaigns are focusing on scams promoting services that claim to eliminate or leverage debt, mortgages and loan obligations. Other spammers are advertising drugs, pirated software or replicas. To guard against spammers, businesses and consumers need to ensure their spam filters and antivirus engines are up to date. When a spam e-mail appears to come from a trusted source, users can be tricked into clicking through to a malicious Web page. The most effective solutions against spam combine a strong reputation system with a complete filtering system that includes statistical analysis, signature filters and multilingual detection.
www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28351543/

Stalking is More Prevalent Than You Think
St. Petersburg Times, (01/11/2009), William Proffitt

Stalking is more prevalent than previous thought, according to a National Institute of Justice study. The study found that 1 million women and nearly 400,000 men in the United States are stalked each year, and that 1 in 12 women and 1 in 45 men are stalked in their lifetimes. Stalking is a crime in all 50 states. Stalking includes conduct that causes someone to suffer substantial emotional distress. More serious stalking crimes include a credible threat with intent to produce reasonable fear of bodily injury or death. Cyber stalking or bullying also has increased in recent years.
www.tampabay.com/news/publicsafety/crime/article962902.ece

New College Prof Helps Land National Institute of Justice Grant
Arizona State University, (01/08/2009)

Arizona State University will be the site of research centered on the psychology of decision making using forensic science expert evidence. The researchers will study how jurors respond to fingerprints, bite marks, handwriting, footwear impressions and other types of forensic evidence. Funded by a two-year, $496,450 grant from the National Institute of Justice, the research has implications for both policy and practice, according to professors at ASU. It could inform forensic scientists on how best to present testimony during trial. It could also be useful for policymakers when developing standards for the admissibility of forensic evidence in court. During the first phase of the project, researchers will create videotaped simulated trial segments that display forms of expert testimony presented by forensic scientists. The second phase will included the conducting of studies using jury-eligible participants, who will view the simulated trials and deliberate the forensic e! vidence presented.
asunews.asu.edu/node/6085

Colorado Schools Use 9-1-1 Call to Activate Incident Command System
PRWeb, (01/08/2009)

Colorado schools have a new tool to use in emergencies. The schools have adopted a system that allows schools to place a 911 call to activate a radio communications network that links school staff with professional responders arriving at the scene. Traditionally, schools facing an emergency have called 911 and waited for first responders to arrive. Under the new enhanced 911 system, schools can call 911 and be immediately connected with first responders through the schools' two-way radios. The radios allow school staff to communicate and work directly with police and other first responders during a crisis. The system will be used in accordance with procedures established by the National Incident Management System.
www.prweb.com/releases/schoolsafe/communications/prweb1839244.htm

NYPD Eyes Disrupting Cell Phones in Event of Terrorist Attack
FOXNews, (01/08/2009), Judith Miller

The New York Police Department is looking for ways to disrupt cell phone calls and other forms of communication among terrorists in the event of a terror attack. The need to disrupt communications is one conclusion draw in the aftermath of the November 2008 attack in Mumbai, India. In testimony prepared for the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Government Affairs, Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly stressed the need for law enforcement practitioners to be able to disrupt cell phone and other communications. During the Mumbai attack, the terrorists' contacts used cell phones and other communication devices to direct the killing of hostages and adjust tactics while the attacks were underway. A three-member NYPD counterterrorism team visited Mumbai after the attack. As a result of that visit, the department has already changed some procedures and conducted new drills in response to vulnerabilities identified by the team.
www.foxnews.com/politics/2009/01/08/nypd-interrupt-cell-phone-service-event-terrorist-attack/

Electronic Traffic Tickets and Gunfire Detection; Technology in the Cop Car
OhMyGov.com, (01/02/2009)

Police in Maryland are using a new system that allows officers to issue electronic traffic citations more efficiently. E-TIX allows officers to scan the driver's license, select the violations and print a copy of the citation on waterproof, hard-to-rip paper. The process, which takes about five minutes, automatically sends the information to the state court system. The system is intended to reduce the amount of time officers spend on the side of the road with drivers, reducing the risk of accidents. Multiple violations can be included in one citation. The technology, developed by the Maryland State Police, is available free to law enforcement agencies in Maryland. The agencies pay for the hardware installation and technical support.
ohmygov.com/blogs/general_news/archive/2009/01/02/electronic-traffic-tickets-and-gunfire-detection-technology-in-the-cop-car.aspx

Tougher DUI Rules Take Effect in Illinois
The Telegraph, (01/01/ 2009), Steve Whitworth

A new Illinois state law requires first-time DUI offenders to equip their vehicles with a device that detects alcohol on their breath. Offenders will be issued a monitoring device driving permit, which allows them to use their vehicles only when it has been equipped with a breath alcohol interlock device. The driver must provide a breath sample with an alcohol content below 0.025 percent, or the vehicle will not start. Also under the law that took effect January 1, a first-time offender found driving with a blood-alcohol level of 0.08 percent or higher will face a six-month suspension of his driver's license. People who refuse to undergo breath analysis will have their licenses suspended for one year. The suspensions will occur 46 days after the arrest or testing date.
www.thetelegraph.com/news/state_21857___article.html/illinois_breath.html

Saturday, January 17, 2009

Military Books

Military-Writers.com is pleased to announce the addition of these servicemembers to the website:

Lt. General Albert P. Clark, USAF (ret.)
Major General James Pocock, USA (ret.)
Brigadier General Nick Halley, USA (ret.)
Brigadier General Dorothy B. Pocklington, USA (ret.)
Brigadier General Albin F. Irzyk, USA (ret.)
Colonel John F. Welch, USAF (ret.)
Colonel Carroll V. Glines, USAF (ret.)
Colonel Charles L. Crain, USA (ret.)
Colonel Eric H. Vieler, USA (ret.)
Colonel Edward Vaughan Coggins, USAF (ret.)
Captain Stanford E. Linzey, USN (ret.)
Captain Dale R. Herspring, USN (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Calvin W. Vraa, USA (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Roland Everett Langford, USA (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Ronald K. Culp, USMC (ret.)
Lt. Colonel James B. Pocock, USAF (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Herman L. Gilster, USAF (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Ralph Peters, USA (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Michael P. Elcano, USA (ret.)
Lt. Colonel Charles T. O’Reilly, USA (ret.)
Commander Raymond B. Allen, USN (ret.)
Commander John C. Whitehead, USN (ret.)
Commander George Sigler, USN (ret.)
Lt. Commander James A. Brink, USN (ret.)
Major Lothar Maier, USAF (ret.)
Major Samuel D. Greco, USAF (ret.)
Major W.L George Collins, USAF (ret.)
Captain Malcom S. Macgruer, USMC (ret.)
Captain Edgar F. Puryear, USAF (ret.)
Captain Roger M. Baty, USA (ret.)
First Lieutenant Donald Springer Hawley, USA (ret.)

The Website now lists 802 servicemembers and their 2583 books.

MORE INFORMATION
Military Books

This information was sponsored by Forensic Science information online.

Wednesday, January 14, 2009

FEMA's Public Relations Campaign

In the past couple of years the terms Criminal Justice, Homeland Security and Emergency Management has started to blend together.  A good example, is that I just finished my Masters degree in Criminal Justice, but my specialization was Homeland Security Administration, meaning all my classes dealt with Terrorism, Infrastructure, IT Security and Emergency Management.  

I'm sure there are a great number of Law Enforcement professionals that have had "First Responder" added to their job description.  With that concept in mind, the majority of my entries in the Criminal Justice online blog will deal with First Responder issues.

With that being said, I wanted to direct your attention to some of the Public Relations tools that FEMA has started to use.  Just this past week Director Paulison held a press conference, on Twitter!  I followed the press conference on my twitter account.  The idea that everyday citizens could ask a high ranking Federal Official questions is fantastic, the format could use some tweaks, which FEMA themselves agreed will take place in the near future.  Also, FEMA has developed its own You Tube channel (www.youtube.com/fema).  Their newest post was from today (1/14) and it is Director Paulison discussing the many improvements that has taken place to FEMA since he took over following Hurricane Katrina.  

Again, for those you that have first responder duties included in your job description, FEMA is a fantastic starting point for a great deal of interactive material.  They also have independent study courses that you can take online and get FEMA certification for.

Sunday, January 11, 2009

Beat Cop

On January 16, 2009, Conversation with American Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion with Jack Lundquist, Oakland Police Department (ret.); his book BeatCop is the Police-Writers 2009 Book of the Year.

Program Date: January 16, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Beat Cop
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/01/17/Beat-Cop

About the Guest
Jack R. Lundquist, Jr. was born and raised in the City of San Pablo, California, a suburb within the San Francisco Bay Area. His desire to be a
police officer was formulated early in life. He became a police explorer scout, and later a reserve police officer with the City of San Pablo Police Department. At age twenty-one Jack Lundquist was drafted by the United States Army, and served as a Military Policeman at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland.

Upon being honorably discharged,
Jack Lundquist returned to the San Francisco Bay area. After a brief stint as a Reserve police officer he was hired by the Oakland Police Department. During his tenure he attended the University of San Francisco, obtaining a Bachelor of Arts Degree. His love for basic patrol work kept him in a marked police car for two separate periods, totaling twelve years. The remainder of the time was spent as criminal investigator, ending with a seven-year period in Vice.

According to the book description, BeatCop is “a book filled with stories from the career of a BeatCop working the perilous streets of a dodgy city. The author is a retired Oakland
police officer, who patrolled the streets for twelve years. His stories cover the good, the bad, and the oh-shits, as well as the humor experienced by a BeatCop working a large city police department.” Jack R. Lundquist, Jr., Oakland Police Department (ret.) was awarded The Police-Writers.com Book of the Year 2009 for his book BeatCop.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.
About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University
Degree in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, Criminal Justice technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/01/17/Beat-Cop

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Saturday, January 10, 2009

Military and Police Books of the Year

January 9, 2009, (San Dimas, CA) American Heroes Press, the publishers of www.military-writers.com and www.police-writers.com, announced the results of their annual recognition.

About the Websites
Military-Writers.com is a website that lists servicemembers from all branches of the United States Armed Forces who have authored books. Currently, the site lists nearly 800 servicemembers and their more than 2,400 books. Servicemembers are listed by name, branch, rank and type of book.

Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local law enforcement officials who have written books. Currently, the website lists more than 1,000 state or local police officers and their more than 2,200 books. Law enforcement officials are listed by name, department and type of book. Additionally, the website has separate sections which list federal law enforcement officials, international police officers and civilian police personnel.

About the Awards
The Military-Writers.com Book of Year 2009 focuses solely on the written contribution made by the servicemember. It is that book found by the panel of judges to be the most significant literary contribution made by a servicemember in the previous year.

The Police-Writers.com Book of the Year 2009 focuses solely on the written contribution made by the police officer. It is that book found by the panel of judges to be the most significant literary contribution made by a police officer in the previous year.

The Military-Writers.com 2009 Book of the Year
Gunnery Sergeant
Nick Popaditch, United States Marine Corps (ret.) was awarded the Military-Writers.com 2009 Book of the Year for his book, Once a Marine.

On April 7, 2004, during the First Battle of Fallujah, Gunnery Sergeant
Nick Popaditch “was wounded in action. During a firefight with enemy insurgents, he was struck in the head by an enemy Rocket Propelled Grenade, fired from a rooftop into the commander’s hatch of his tank. He received numerous shrapnel wounds.” His injuries necessitated the removal of his right eye; and, “his remaining eye was legally blind. His right ear and nose sustained significant damage and an implant was placed in his skull.”

In his book, Once a Marine: An Iraq War Tank Commander’s Inspirational Memoir of Combat, Courage, and Recovery,
Nick Popaditch describes how at first he “fights to get back to where he was in Iraq - in the cupola of an M1A1 main battle tank, leading Marines in combat at the point of the spear. As the seriousness and permanence of his disabilities become more evident, Nick Popaditch fights to remain in the Corps in any capacity, to help the brothers in arms he so aches to rejoin. Facing the inevitable following a medical retirement, he battles for rightful recognition and compensation for his permanent disabilities. Throughout his harrowing ordeal, Nick Popaditch fights to maintain his honor and loyalty, waging all these battles the same way - the Marine way.”

The Police-Writers.com Book of the Year 2009
Jack R. Lundquist, Jr., Oakland Police Department (ret.) was awarded The Police-Writers.com Book of the Year 2009 for his book BeatCop.

Jack R. Lundquist, Jr. was born and raised in the City of San Pablo, California, a suburb within the San Francisco Bay Area. His desire to be a police officer was formulated early in life. He became a police explorer scout, and later a reserve police officer with the City of San Pablo Police Department. At age twenty-one Jack Lundquist was drafted by the United States Army, and served as a Military Policeman at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland.

Upon being honorably discharged,
Jack Lundquist returned to the San Francisco Bay area. After a brief stint as a Reserve Police Officer he was hired by the Oakland Police Department. During his tenure he attended the University of San Francisco, obtaining a Bachelor of Arts Degree. His love for basic patrol work kept him in a marked police car for two separate periods, totaling twelve years. The remainder of the time was spent as criminal investigator, ending with a seven-year period in Vice.

According to the book description, BeatCop is “a book filled with stories from the career of a BeatCop working the perilous streets of a dodgy city. The author is a retired Oakland Police Officer, who patrolled the streets for twelve years. His stories cover the good, the bad, and the oh-shits, as well as the humor experienced by a BeatCop working a large city police department.”

American Heroes Press Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Thursday, January 08, 2009

Public Safety Technology in the News

Computerized Crimefighter Looks for Faces of Bad Guys
Seattle Times, (12/21/2008), Stacey Mulick

The Pierce County Sheriff's Department in Washington state is solving crimes using new facial-recognition software. As part of a pilot project, the department recently used Sagem Morpho's facial recognition software to compare surveillance ATM images with 16 years' worth of prison mug shots taken at the Pierce County Jail. In 15 minutes, the search identified a suspect in a number of ATM thefts. Detectives are now revisiting unsolved bank robberies, ATM scams and other crimes that have good surveillance images in hopes the software can help solve those cases. The sheriff's department paid Sagem Morpho, a French company, $18,000 to test the software in the last six months of 2008.
seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2008544751_morphoface21m.html

MU Crime House Training Officers
The Herald-Dispatch, (12/21/2008), Bill Rosenberger

An old house is being used as a tool to train law enforcement officers in crime scene investigation. Law enforcement officers can hone their skills at the crime scene house on the grounds of Marshall University's Forensic Science Center in West Virginia. Training is provided by the FBI to practitioners from state and local law enforcement agencies around the nation. The house is also used for training Marshall graduate students in the forensic science program. The house has been used to train more than 200 people since 2006. The house has a large basement, a main story with multiple sections, bedrooms on the second floor and an attic on the third floor. Trainers set up different crime scenes. One room contains lab equipment that allows investigators to analyze fingerprints and foot impressions. The first floor is wired with audio and video equipment to provide instructors with a means to critique a student's performance.
www.herald-dispatch.com/news/x1746811381/MU-crime-house-used-to-train-officers

Track Star AVLS Enhances Safety of Students on School Buses in Gloucester Township NJ
GISuser.co, (12/23/08)

Gloucester Township has begun using GPS technology to improve safety aboard school buses. The Track Star AVLS GPS vehicle tracking system displays movement and activity on the buses, including their speed, on computer maps monitored by police and school officials. The system will alert officials to a crash, and the driver has a "panic button" which when pushed alerts officials to accidents or trouble on the bus requiring police assistance.
www.gisuser.com/content/view/16392/2/

La. License Plate Cameras Boost Arrests
Times-Picayune, (12/18/2008), Michelle Hunter

The use of automated license-plate recognition cameras is paying off for the Jefferson Parish Sheriff's Office in Louisiana. In just 25 days of using the technology, officers made 20 arrests and recovered 23 stolen vehicles. Seventy-six fixed and mobile cameras are programmed to scan the plates of passing vehicles, which often results in immediate identification of ones that have been stolen. Stolen car alerts from mobile cameras, which are mounted on patrol cars, pop-up on laptop computers in police cars. Alerts from stationary cameras go to the 911 center. Prior to using the cameras, the sheriff's office recovered three or four stolen cars a month. The system can also be used to look for suspects in other crimes. Each stationary camera costs $14,000. The mobile units cost about $25,000 per patrol car.
www.policeone.com/legal/articles/1767004-La-license-plate-cameras-boost-arrests/

Website to Aid in Identifying Bodies Found in Broward
Miami Herald, (12/16/2008), Adam H. Beasley

The Broward County Sheriff's Office is using a new feature on its Web site to help authorities identify people who have been found dead. Operation Found and Forgotten on the department Web site (http://www.sheriff.org) details the profiles of 40 unidentified people who died under suspicious circumstances - what they looked like, their clothes at the time they were found. A link to the Broward Crime Stoppers tip system accompanies every profile.
www.miamiherald.com/466/story/815184.html

Federal Funds Help Upgrade Dispatch Center's Computer Software
Franklin Park Herald-Journal, (12/25/20008), Cathryn Gran

The Franklin Park Police Department in Illinois is using a federal grant to upgrade its dispatch center. The $935,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Justice will allow enhancements to provide the capability to generate computerized accident reports and tickets. The dispatch center will also have mapping capabilities and access to databases to provide officers with the most up-to-date information. The new equipment will be installed in 2009.
www.pioneerlocal.com/franklinpark/news/1344269,fp-copsgrant-122408-s1.article

New Radio Network to Enhance Emergency Operations
Current Argus, (12/26/2008), Stella Davis

A new regional interoperable radio network will enhance emergency operations in New Mexico. Eddy County is the latest jurisdiction to switch to the new system. Funding in part came from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to provide police and fire agencies with system compatible interoperable radios. Prior to the installation of five communication towers around the county, emergency personnel could not communicate well with other agencies due to dead spots. Officers would have to call their dispatch office in Carlsbad and dispatch in turn would contact the agency the officers wanted to speak to. The new system provides wide area network coverage. The completed network will include more than 300 portable radios and 300 mobile in-vehicle radios.
www.currentargus.com/ci_11317446

U.S. Police Could Get 'Pain Beam' Weapons
NewScientist.com, (12/24/2008,) David Hambling

The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is working on portable nonlethal weapons that can inflict pain from a distance using beams of laser light. The technology for the devices, which could be used by police to subdue suspects, is devised from the Pentagon's Active Denial System. The technology uses a beam of short microwaves to heat up the outer layer of a person's skin. NIJ is currently testing its Personnel Halting and Stimulation Response device, which resembles a bulky rifle. Its second device, a portable microwave-based weapon, is less developed. It currently is a tabletop prototype with a range of less than a meter.
www.newscientist.com/article/dn16339-us-police-could-get-pain-beam-weapons.html

Monday, January 05, 2009

Citizen Survival of Terrorist Attacks

On January 9, 2009, Conversations with Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion with self-defense expert Jim Wagner on how a citizen non-combatant can best survive a terrorist attack.

Program Date: January 9, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Citizen Survival of Terrorist Attacks
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/01/10/Citizen-Survival-of-Terrorist-Attacks

About the Guests
At the age of 14,
Jim Wagner began to his life long pursuit of self-defense by beginning his study of the marital arts. Four years later he joined the United States Army. In 1991 Jim Wagner, sponsored by the Costa Mesa Police Department, entered the police academy (Orange County Sheriff’s Department Training Academy Class 104). Like his Military training before, Jim Wagner was deeply influenced by the police academy’s realistic conflict scenarios.

During his career with the
Costa Mesa Police Department, Jim Wagner earned a place on the SWAT team. It was through this conduit that Jim learned about logistics, command post operations, hostage negotiations, entry team tactics, and sniping. On the job training included courses with LAPD SWAT, the U.S. Army Special Forces, the Orange County Sheriff’s Department Tactical Training Center, and from U.S. Marines Division Schools Camp Pendleton (Advanced Sniper Course, Military Operations Urban Terrain, Helicopter Rope Suspension Training, and Range Safety Officer).

While conducting a myriad of courses at Camp Pendleton, both
Military units and other law enforcement agencies using the base for their own training discovered Jim Wagner’s unique approach to training and his seamless blending of defensive tactics with edged weapons and firearms skills. Before long he was getting offers from the United States Marine Corps, U.S. Marshals Special Operations Group, Department of Defense police, California Highway Patrol, California Department of Corrections, San Diego Sheriff’s Department, Los Angeles Probation Department, U.S. Border Patrol, Immigration & Naturalization Service, U.S. Navy and U.S. Marines Provost Marshal Office, Drug Enforcement Administration. By 1996 Jim found himself being invited by foreign unit to train in their own countries: GermanGSG9, Brazilian G.A.T.E., Argentinean G.O.E., Royal Canadian Mounted Police, London Metropolitan Police, Helsinki Police Department, and various units in Spain, Mexico, and Israel.

The demand on
Jim Wagner’s time was overwhelming and in 1999 he decided to resign from the Costa Mesa Police Department and started teaching full time. Not wanting to fully give up his law enforcement career Jim applied as a Reserve Deputy at the Orange County Sheriff’s Department. Jim Wagner is the author of Reality Based Personal Protection.

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles
police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, Criminal Justice technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/01/10/Citizen-Survival-of-Terrorist-Attacks

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530