Criminal Justice News

Tuesday, July 31, 2007

Law Enforcement Technology

NIJ Rural Law Enforcement Technology Institute
Dates: February 24-28, 2008
Location: Charleston,
South Carolina
Application Deadline: December 12, 2007

Overview
This
technology institute, sponsored by the National Institute of Justice and hosted by the Rural Law Enforcement Technology Center, is designed for the command staff of rural and small law enforcement agencies containing less than 50 sworn officers. Law enforcement personnel will learn about and discuss technology initiatives and issues affecting the rural and small law enforcement community. Participants will receive information and assistance on existing and developing technologies, work through problems relating to technology implementation, and exchange technology lessons learned, that are of importance to the rural and small law enforcement community.

Registration and Attendance
There is no registration cost and all travel, food, and lodging expenses are paid. However, only 35 individuals will be selected to attend.

Note: Previous attendees of the Rural
Law Enforcement Technology Institute or NIJ's Law Enforcement or Corrections Technology Institutes are not eligible to reattend.

Participants will give brief (no more than 15 minutes) presentations on a technology issue that their departments have encountered or are in the process of implementing (e.g., implementation of a crime mapping program, new communications system, automated booking station). The presentation can be either on an "issue to be dealt with" or a "lessons learned" and must be submitted on CD-ROM with the application.

Applications received after December 12, 2007 or without submitted presentation will not be considered.

Applications may be downloaded from the NIJ web site at
www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/events/rural-institute.htm

Contact Information
Please contact Scott Barker, Deputy Director-Rural
Law Enforcement Technology Center, at 866-787-2553 or by email at ruletc1@aol.com for additional information about the Rural Law Enforcement Technology Institute.

Monday, July 30, 2007

ApNano Materials Establishes Nano Armor Subsidiary to Produce Ultra-Strong Bullet-Proof Products

July 30, 2007. ApNano Materials, Inc.(www.apnano.com), a provider of nanotechnology-based products, today announced the establishment of a subsidiary of ApNano Materials that will develop and manufacture the company's new NanoArmor™ line of nanotechnology-based bullet-proof products. The new subsidiary will start with products that enhance the performance of personal safety items such as bullet proof vests and helmets, and will continue with protection products for vehicles and aircraft.

"The company has already started negotiations with investors," said Aharon Feuerstein, ApNano Materials' Chairman and CFO. "In addition, NanoArmor potential products have already attracted huge interest from
military, law enforcement and homeland security organizations and agencies in various countries."

The Nano Armor products will be based on ApNano’s proprietary nanospheres and nanotubes, which are excellent shock absorbing materials and among the most impact resistant substances known in the world today. These revolutionary nanoparticles of inorganic compounds provide exceptional shock absorbing capabilities. ApNano's nanomaterials have up to twice the strength of today’s best impact resistant protective armor materials such as boron carbide and silicon carbide used in hard armor plates, and is 4-5 times stronger than steel.

The Nano Armor products will be made of tungsten disulfide (WS2) nanoparticles, currently manufactured by ApNano Materials, under the trade name NanoArmor™. In addition, the subsidiary will develop multi-walled titanium-based nanoparticles which will enable it to produce over 50% lighter weight armor products.

NanoArmor will provide multi-hit protection as well as enhanced ballistic and blast resistance. It will enable the development of special trauma layers behind the armor, reducing the level of blunt force trauma injuries.

ApNano's nanospheres were tested by a research group headed by Dr. Yan Qiu Zhu of the School of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, at the University of Nottingham, England. The material was subjected to severe shocks generated by firing shots at it at impact velocities of up to 1.5 km/second. The nanospheres withstood the shock pressures generated by the impacts of up to 250 tons per square centimeter. The nanospheres are so strong that after the impact the samples remained essentially identical compared to the starting material. In contrast, similarly structured hollow spheres of carbon, fail under much lower pressures of less than one tenth of those that the nanospheres can survive. Apnano's nanospheres are termed inorganic fullerene-like nanostructures, or IF for short. Fullerenes are soccer ball-like clusters of atoms, named after R. Buckminster Fuller, architect of the geodesic dome that he designed for the 1967 Montreal World Exhibition.

ApNano's nanotubes were also found as ultra-strong impact resistant material. "The unique nanotubes of ApNano Materials are up to 4-5 times stronger than steel and about 6 times stronger than Kevlar, a popular material today for bullet proof vests," said Professor Reshef Tenne, The Drake Family Chair in Nanotechnology at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, and the Director of Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for Nanoscale Science, who co-discovered the unique nanoparticles.

"Laboratory experiments conducted by Nobel Laureate Professor Sir Harold Kroto and his colleagues have demonstrated that ApNano’s nanotubes are strong enough to withstand a pressure of 21 GPa (Gigapascal) – the equivalent of 210 tons per square centimeter,” said Dr. Menachem Genut, President and CEO of ApNano Materials. Dr. Genut was a research fellow in the original research group which discovered the IF nanoparticles at the Weizmann Institute and first to synthesize the new materials.

Recently ApNano Materials opened a new 1,000 square meter manufacturing facility in Israel. The facility houses a semi-industrial reactor with a production capacity of tons of the company's nanomaterial. The new state-of-the-art manufacturing facility meets international guidelines for health, safety and manufacturing of nanomaterials.

ApNano has already launched another product, NanoLub®, the world's first commercial nanotechnology-based solid lubricant. “NanoLub has been shown in numerous independent tests worldwide to reduce friction and wear significantly better than conventional lubricants, especially under extreme conditions such as very high loads,” said Dr. Niles Fleischer, Vice President of Business Development and Vice President of Product Development of ApNano Materials.

About ApNano Materials
ApNano Materials (www.apnano.com ), is a private nanotechnology company founded in 2002 by Dr. Menachem Genut, President and CEO and Mr. Aharon Feuerstein, Chairman and CFO. ApNano Materials was incorporated in the US and is headquartered in New York, USA. Its fully-owned Israeli subsidiary - NanoMaterials, Ltd., is located in the high tech science park adjacent to the Weizmann Institute campus in Nes Ziona, Israel. The company was granted an exclusive license by Yeda Research and Development Co. Ltd, the commercial arm of the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, to manufacture, commercialize and sell a new class of nanomaterials based on inorganic compounds that were discovered at the Institute. The shareholders of ApNano Materials, besides the founders, are Newton
Technology VC Fund, Yeda Research and Development Co. LTD. (the commercial arm of the Weizmann Institute of Science), AYYT LTD. (the commercial arm of HIT, Israel), and private European investors.

NanoLub and NanoArmor, green, environmentally friendly materials, are trademarks of ApNano Materials, Inc.

Duty, Death and Crime

Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three police officers: Michael P. Tremoglie; Maria Watson; and Reuben Greenberg.

Michael P. Tremoglie is a former Philadelphia Police Department police officer. Michael P. Tremoglie is currently a staff writer for The (Philadelphia) Evening Bulletin and a columnist for FrontPage Magazine. His work has regularly appeared in publications such as the Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, Human Events, Pittsburgh Tribune Review and the Lansdale Reporter. He has a BA in accounting and a Masters in Criminal Justice. He is the Author of A Sense of Duty.

According to the Philadelphia Bulletin, A Sense Of Duty “does for big city
police training what Stanley Kubrick's Vietnam classic, "Full Metal Jacket" did for U. S. Marine boot camp. Tremoglie's attention to detail and understanding of the psychological hazards circling around his characters draws its readers into a world fraught with pending disaster, mixed with the joy of accomplishment, and then hit with the harsh reality of the eventualities its inhabitants tried so hard to avoid. A Sense Of Duty deals with clashes between cultures, social status, ideologies, political parties, races, sexes, along with hopes and dreams.”

In 1976,
Maria Watson and her twin sister Margie were part of the first 100 women hired for patrol duty by the Philadelphia Police Department. During her law enforcement career, Maria Watson worked uniformed patrol, narcotics, juvenile aid division and sex crime’s child abuse unit. She retired from the Philadelphia Police Department in 1996. She is the author of the novel Dead in Fairmont Park.

According to the book description of Dead in Fairmont Park, “Michelle Burns,
Philadelphia Police Lieutenant, like other female African American lieutenants without a squad to command, was buried behind a desk in homicide. That all changed when the third body was found in Fairmount Park's nature trails.”

Reuben Greenberg was the African American Chief of Police of the Charleston Police Department (South Carolina). In 1967, he received a BA degree from San Francisco State University and he has two master’s degrees, one in public administration and the other in city planning, both from the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught sociology at California State University, political science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and criminal justice at Florida International University.

His career in
law enforcement spanned three states before he arrived in South Carolina in 1982. While in California, he served as the undersheriff of the San Francisco County Sheriff's Department. A Savannah, Georgia, he was a major with the city's police department. In Florida, he was chief of police at Opa-Locka and chief deputy sheriff of Orange County, rising to deputy director of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. Reuben Greenberg is the author of Let's Take Back Our Streets!

According to Publisher’s Weekly, “Greenberg disputes the contention that law-breakers are victims of circumstance; they commit crimes by choice, he argues, and ought to be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. He also stresses that the function of punishment is, indeed, to punish. This is a book of tough talk from a police chief who firmly believes that we are all accountable for our actions and urges both police and citizens not to surrender to hopelessness about crime.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 680
police officers (representing 305 police departments) and their 1455 books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Sunday, July 29, 2007

California and Oregon

Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added police officer authors from California and Oregon: Kent Anderson; Bernard K. Smith; and, Robert Dent.

At the age of 19
Kent Anderson joined the Merchant Marines and traveled the world for two years. By his 23 birthday, he was a Special Forces sergeant in Vietnam, where he was awarded two bronze stars. In 1973, he joined the Portland Police Bureau, and worked as a street cop for 4 years before taking a leave of absence to earn an MFA in Fiction Writing from the University of Montana in Missoula. At the age of 37, he returned to police work and joined the Oakland Police Department (California). After two years on the Oakland Police Department he resigned because he was, “sick of making unnecessary arrests to fill out the monthly quotas.

According to
Kent Anderson, “that winter, broke and jobless, out of sheer terror” he wrote the first complete draft of Sympathy for the Devil. Shortly thereafter, he obtained a teaching job in El Paso at the University of Texas and rewrote the book several times during his four-year stay on the border. He is also the author of Night Dogs and Liquor, Guns and Ammo: The Collected Short Fiction and Non-Fiction of Kent Anderson.

According to one reader/reviewer of Night Dogs, it “is a tough, gritty view of life on the streets and the way police officers deal with their constant exposure to this madness. It is very realistic and presents a variety of characters, some of which you might encounter in any big city.”

Bernard K. Smith as a police officer for the Portland Police Bureau (Oregon) for eleven years. He then continued with his career in criminal justice as a trial attorney. He is the author of seven fiction and or/science fiction books: Chris’s Cross; Hair Lock; Red Hats; Shark; Bear; Argo; and, Islands in the Sky. According to the book description of his most recent book, Islands in the Sky, “In a world with a great gulf between the haves and have-nots, one strong willed and resourceful man fights for his future. Cord is a man that is trying to survive and thrive. He finds a woman to love and protect to share in a battle to find a better place in a frightening world.”

Robert Dent is a 29 year law enforcement veteran and a recently retired Oregon State Police Senior Trooper. He has served in the Criminal, Narcotic and Patrol divisions of the Oregon State Police and is the Founder and President of the Constable Group, Inc. which is a privately held corporation that conducts training seminars and publishes language and communication training manuals, videos and educational materials for public safety and educational facilities, as well as private companies and corporations involved with executive protection, counter-terrorism and industrial security. He is also the author of: The Complete Spanish Field Reference Manual for Public Safety Professionals; The Multi-Lingual Field Manual for Public Safety Professionals; and, Silent Universal Signals for Public Safety and Education Professionals. He is also the co-author of 18 Silent Universal Signals for School Safety.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 674
police officers (representing 302 police departments) and their 1447 books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Friday, July 27, 2007

New Crime Scene/Evidence Technology

July 09, 2007: Analyzing Sexual Assaults at a Crime Scene has just become faster, more reliable, and more accurate then ever before. Hillside, IL - Independent Forensics, a DNA Testing and Technology company announced today the availability of SPERM HY-LITER™; the most advanced sexual assault evidence analysis technology available to crime laboratories and CSI technicians today.

Standard staining techniques, such as KPIC (Christmas Tree stain) or H & E, used for locating and determining the presence of sperm in sexual assault evidence, are not specific for sperm and rely on morphology for identification. Using SPERM HY-LITER™ only human sperm are identified and sperm hidden by debris or cellular material, which is often the case from forensic samples, are easily visualized

SPERM HY-LITER™ employs a unique method to fluorescently label human sperm from sexual assault evidence. Combined with Independent Forensics’ Rapid Stain Identification™ test for human semen (RSID-Semen™), crime laboratories now have an effective system to identify, which samples will yield a
DNA profile of the rapist. SPERM HY-LITER™ directly addresses the backlog of untested rape cases and can easily be incorporated into current forensic laboratory practice

CEO Jack Keehma states that this revolutionary technology will greatly impact sexual assault analysis and change the way sexual assault evidence is screened and processed by crime laboratories.

“It was well understood that the previous methods used were 30 to 50 years old and did not offer the specificity that is now demanded and required by the forensic community,” said Dr. Karl Reich, Chief Scientific Officer.

About Independent Forensics
Founded in 2002; Independent Forensics manufactures, sells and distributes its Rapid Stain Identification™ kits to crime laboratories in the U.S. and around the world.

Independent Forensics is internationally recognized as a full service
DNA testing laboratory, performing paternity, immigration and forensic testing. The staff of Independent Forensics also provides expert witness services to both the prosecution and the defense.

For more information about the SPERM HY-LITER™ or Rapid Stain IDentification™ tests for Saliva, Semen or Blood including requisite equipment and training contact Independent Forensics
DNA Testing & Technologies at 866-434-2400 or www.ifi-test.com.

For Press Relations, Please Contact:
Jack Keehma 1-866-434-2400 x225
Mike Freud 1-866-434-2400 x292

Civilian Job Skills Help Guardsmen Address Afghanistan's Poppy Problem

By Capt. Brian M. O'Malley, USA
Special to American Forces Press Service

July 26, 2007 - Afghan and international forces are looking to solve to Afghanistan's poppy problem and to maximize agricultural output. Now,
Army 1st Lt. Gris Babcock of the 207th Regional Security Assistance Command here may have found a way to help. The Afghan poppy trade produces most of the world's opium, the resulting illegal drug trafficking helps to finance the Taliban and other enemies of the government. Efforts to combat the problem include helping farmers in the impoverished nation learn economically viable alternatives to growing poppy.

An employee of the U.S. Department of Agriculture in his civilian job, this member of the Idaho National Guard applied his knowledge to develop the center. The center is remarkably comprehensive, with laboratories and classrooms, and even fish ponds with hatcheries. It includes beehives, vineyards and orchards. When completed, the center will even have a weather station.

Officials have begun work on 10 acres of orchards that will include apricot, plum, almond, pomegranate, mulberry, and wild pistachio trees. The next step for the orchards is to install a drip irrigation system. The saplings from the orchards will go to surrounding villages to start their own nurseries. Although the villages will be cultivating the nurseries, they will be under the auspices of the center.

Another 10 acres will be used to grow six different varieties of grapes. Grapes had been all but wiped out by the Taliban because they could be used to produce wine. "Grapes are lucrative and require very little summer watering, which make them an ideal crop. With the introduction of trellising, yields will increase at least 60 percent in this ideal climate," Babcock said. "The key is to teach trellising and pruning techniques, which are virtually unknown in this country."

The grapes will be sold as fruit and as raisins.

Saffron also will be introduced. This crop is the most promising to replace the poppy crop as a cash crop, officials said. It will be grown first at the center and then move to surrounding villages. "The main hold-up right now for the saffron is signing with a good export company in Herat, but we should have one soon without much difficulty," Babcock said.

The fish ponds will be virtually self-sufficient, with waste water used to fertilize the plants. A small-scale, sustainable, warm-water fish hatchery will be built for grass carp.

"Currently the fish market in Herat is completely under-supplied, though demand is huge. Our goal will be to link five ponds in the villages. This obviously is very site-specific, but can be done with the abundance of irrigation ditches," Babcock said.

"Grass carp eat everything, particularly grass, which will grow in wet, muddy pond bottoms in two weeks here," he said.

Babcock explained that the fish are induced to spawn by raising and lowering water levels. The effort will begin with only two spawning pairs. The high productivity of the pairs allows the initial breading stock to be relatively low. After the drawdown -- during which the water will irrigate crops -- adult fish will be removed and fingerlings can mature. "Soon, the fish can be taken to market in coolers filled with ice, or eaten locally," he said.

In addition, Honey production will begin at the station and at the village nurseries on a smaller scale. "This is a highly lucrative crop, and has the added benefit of increasing crop production," Babcock said.

"Currently, the honey that is available here is a low grade that comes from Iran," he said. "We will purchase all the equipment, and the (Agriculture) Department will bring down a trainer for a course. At the station, a small bottling room will be available for the station's production and locals if they want to use it."

When complete, this project will be run by Afghans, taught by Afghans and worked by Afghans, U.S. officials said.

(
Army Capt. Brian M. O'Malley is assigned to Task Force Phoenix.)

Thursday, July 26, 2007

Law Enforcement Technology

NLECTC Law Enforcement & Corrections Technology News Summary
Thursday, July 26, 2007

"NOPD Unveils New Crime Maps"
New Orleans Times-Picayune (07/20/07) P. 1; McCarthy, Brendan

On July 19, the
New Orleans Police Department launched an upgraded Web site mapping tool that lays out crimes on a map. The tool, located at the bottom of the police department's Web site, permits users to enter any address in New Orleans. At that point, they can look for particular crimes, zoom in and out of certain neighborhoods, and locate incidents going back to the start of 2005. The mapping tool was published on the Web site in early May and got poor reviews from users, who contended that crime information was missing, the maps were difficult to read, and directions were bad. Since then, police department technology head Maj. Michael Sauter and the Mayor's Office of Technology have redone the model and included numerous features. Users can now look by police district boundaries, neighborhoods, ZIP codes, and other information. In addition, they can email maps and transfer the information onto spreadsheets. Sauter notes that around 95 percent of all uniform crime events will be included in the mapping database.
http://www.nola.com/news/t-p/frontpage/index.ssf?/
base/news-8/118491566289730.xml&coll=1

"Do Tasers Save Lives? DeKalb Takes Another Look"
Atlanta Journal-Constitution (07/23/07); Simpson, David

The DeKalb County, Ga.,
Police Department, which stopped using Taser stun guns in 2005 due to alleged fatalities, is reconsidering the device. Before DeKalb withdrew its Tasers, the guns had been employed 62 times without a reported injury or complaint by a civilian, notes Maj. J.E. Helms, who heads training for DeKalb police. Helms stresses he does not think Tasers by themselves cause fatalities. DeKalb Police Chief Terrell Bolton has obtained the assistance of Southern Christian Leadership Conference president Charles Steele Jr. in facilitating the comeback of Tasers for DeKalb police. Steele states he is in favor of the decision, so long as officers and medical employees are correctly instructed. Meanwhile, R.K. de Graaf, the vice president of the Fraternal Order of Police's DeKalb chapter, stresses the stun guns protect both officers and suspects from injuries. Nationally, Tasers have been marketed as a way to lower shootings, with varied results. Shootings in Miami are said to have significantly fallen when Tasers are employed, while Houston saw its shooting fatalities rise from two in 2004 to 11 in 2005 after Tasers were distributed to officers.
http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/dekalb/
stories/2007/07/22/taser_0723.html

"Laconia Police Eye Use of TASERs"
Laconia Citizen (NH) (07/20/07)

The Laconia, N.H.,
Police Department is ready to wrap up another fiscal year and is thinking about employing Taser stun guns. The department has already bought one Taser. While both the Belknap Sheriff's Department and the Tilton Police Department employ Tasers, Laconia Police Chief Tom Oetinger said on July 19 that he wants Lt. Steve Clarke to perform an in-depth study of the guns' utilization across New Hampshire and nationally before they are implemented in Laconia. "While I'm always interested in being ahead of the curve in a lot of areas, technology involving the use of force is something where I tend to be conservative until there is some sort of ability to benchmark it and there has been significant street use by other organizations," Oetinger stated.
http://www.citizen.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=
/20070720/CITIZEN_01/107200345/-1/CITIZEN

"Cameras to Catch Street Action"
Capital Times (WI) (07/19/07) P. B2; Miller, Mike

Police in Madison, Wis., are using video cameras to better monitor a busy downtown area of the city heavily populated by bars and clubs. The department says they hope this new technology will provide a more efficient, cost effective way of monitoring the area. The city has spent an additional $100,000 to up police presence in the downtown district as a response to some recent robberies and disturbances caused by drinkers leaving the bars. One camera will be set up in the area on a trial basis. If the trial proves successful, eight more will be put in place by fall. These cameras will be hooked up to laptops in police cruisers allowing officers to monitor several areas at once. http://www.madison.com

"Homeland Security Grants Aid Vital Communications"
Omaha World-Herald (NE) (07/19/07); Stoddard, Martha

New grants announced on July 18 will provide Iowa and Nebraska significant help in offering police, fire fighters, and additional emergency responders the means to speak with each other.
Iowa's 911 project manager, John Benson, explained the new grant will be crucial to his state's communications campaign. Nebraska Emergency Management Agency assistant director Al Berndt added that his state has employed a large percentage of its homeland security money to expand the communications network throughout Nebraska. Nebraska has evolved in enabling law enforcement and first responders to talk with each other within certain areas, he added. The initiative includes new radio equipment and technology. Berndt says the next phase is to expand that ability to the entire state and get state agencies on board. The U.S. government is offering $968 million for communications nationwide, utilizing money presented by Congress in a bill from 2005. http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=2798&u_sid=10081784

"A Full-Scale Immersion in Disaster Training"
Colorado Springs Gazette (07/22/07); Zubeck, Pam

The National Exercise Program's latest simulation center in Washington, D.C., conducted a nationwide emergency response
training between April 30 and May 17, engaging emergency responders from 11 states and six federal agencies. The latest nationwide drill, Ardent Sentry, cost $20 million and forced responders to extend their resources as a Category 3 mock hurricane hit New England--affecting seven states--and several other disasters occurred within days. The national center is expected to provide written and electronic synopses of the training simulations involving various local and federal personnel to help local and state governments create their own training programs for emergency responders. The center also will offer tabletop exercises and other localized drill information. Officials at the center say that a nuclear disaster will overwhelm many local response teams and their ability to medically care for the injured and exposed.
http://www.gazette.com/articles/national_25130___article.html/pino_local.html

"La. State Police Crime Lab Shrinks Rape Kit Backlog"
Advocate (07/18/07) P. A1; Vetter, Kimberly

The backlog of sexual-assault kits in
Louisiana that have not been examined for DNA evidence has fallen from 3,100 four years ago to 200. Louisiana State Police Crime Laboratory director Capt. Jerry Patrick notes that kits between 2004 and this year exist, and that the remainder of the kits, many of them going back to the 1980s, have been taken care of. Patrick credits the lab's ability to lower its backlog to federal grant funds and an expansion in the lab's DNA program. He adds that processing a single rape kit for DNA information costs between $600 and $1,000. Being able to reduce Louisiana's backlog has created an increase in the ability to resolve cold cases. After a rape kit is processed, the results are studied and put in a database known as the Combined Index System (CODIS). The database employs a pair of indexes to produce investigative crimes in cases where biological proof is found at a crime scene. The Convicted Offender index lists DNA profiles of individuals found guilty of felony sex crimes and additional violent offenses. http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/8566202.html

"State Gears Up to Use Internet to Improve 911 Calls"
Knoxville News-Sentinel (TN) (07/18/07); Jacobs, Don

Emergency Services centers are looking for ways to use the Internet to make responding to a crisis faster and easier.
Tennessee is one state already looking to institute a new Web-based technology called Next Generation-911 (NG-911). This system will use a combination of Internet technology and fiber-optics that will allow callers to communicate visual as well as verbal information to dispatchers. The dispatchers will then be able to use the same system to send that message to personnel in the field. It will also allow emergency service workers from across the state to better coordinate their efforts. For example, police will be able to use the system to scan fingerprints during traffic stops. NG-911 can also be used to transmit a 3-D map of a building in a siege situation to help officers find the safest way to extract hostages.
http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2007/jul/18/state-gears-
up-to-use-internet-to-improve-911/

"State-Run Sites Not Effective Vs. Terror"
USA Today (07/23/07); Hall, Mimi

The 42 anti-
terrorism "fusion" centers that have been created in 37 states have thus far proved inefficient at sharing information to combat terrorism, according to a new report from the Congressional Research Service. The fusion centers were created with the aim of increasing information-sharing among federal, state, and local law enforcement officials. But many of the centers have strayed from their central anti-terrorism mission and have instead "increasingly gravitated toward an all-crimes and even broader all-hazards approach," the report says. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has provided states with some $380 million in funding to create the fusion centers. One common problem plaguing the centers is that federal agents have resisted sharing information with local police, said Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), who believes there should be a requirement that federal analysts be posted at each center. One DHS official predicts that by the end of 2008, 35 DHS analysts will be working in the centers.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-07-23-intel-centers_N.htm

"Notification System Gives Status of Criminal Cases"
Reading Eagle (PA) (07/18/07); Young, Mary E.

Victims and witnesses of crime in Berks County, Pa., might be automatically informed in the near future by email or phone when the defendants in whose cases they had a part are to be set free from jail. Computer equipment would be made available within eight weeks after the county commissioners sanction county involvement in the system. A federal grant of $1.25 million will fund the equipment. Victims and witnesses who choose to be entered into the system will have to offer contact data and utilize a personal identification code to obtain information. The system would inform users when a certain defendant is set free on bail, has finished a jail term, or is sent to another facility. District Attorney Mark C. Baldwin believes the system will be helpful as well to law enforcement officials. The system will eventually have data on prisoners in all 53 of
Pennsylvania's county prisons and possibly data on inmates in state jails. The system was scheduled to be voted on July 19. http://readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=50794


"New Lab Expands N.Y.'s Ability to Analyze DNA"
Newark Star-Ledger (NJ) (07/19/07) P. 32

New York City intends to expand its study of
DNA evidence by over 17,000 cases annually, due to a new forensics lab that authorities claim is the biggest in the nation. On July 18, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and other city representatives met to formally launch the Forensic Biology Laboratory of the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. New York City wants to begin studying DNA evidence in over 20,000 cases annually, up from the present 3,000 per year. The facility cost nearly $290 million, and has 75,000 square feet of lab room. Bloomberg explained that the lab would enable New York City to locate criminals, and also rule out innocent individuals and study DNA evidence in crimes beside murder cases, including burglaries. He added that the lab would be utilized as well by the Missing Persons agency and the unit that attempts to locate the remains of World Trade Center victims. Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly stated that police officers would be alternating their protocols to make obtaining DNA an element of more crime investigations. "We'll be increasing our obtaining of DNA samples and training people, our evidence collection teams," Kelly said. http://www.nj.com/news/ledger

"Digital Prints"
Idaho Falls Post Register (07/19/07) P. A1; Wells, Heather

The Rexburg,
Idaho, Police Department has been pursuing those who are involved in child pornography with the aid of new software that permits investigators to acquire digital proof from storage devices in computers by making a copy of their hard drives. The software can find files that were rewritten or removed, helping to catch child pornographers and embezzlers, and breaking up drug rings. Rexburg police are now utilizing the Forensic Tool Kit to look into a pair of child pornography cases, and they hope to bring charges soon. Earlier in 2007, Rexburg Police Department Det. Supervisor Lt. Shane Turmin requested a federal grant for $14,000 to buy the tool kit. Though the Idaho Falls Police Department does not employ the kit, it does have access to related software. That department has been able to determine passwords on computers and obtain files as primary evidence in child pornography cases. Last year, 17,291 cyber-crime complaints were filed in this country. http://www.idahonews.com

"Sheriff Welcomes Statewide Role"
New Orleans Times-Picayune (07/19/07) P. 1; Scallan, Matt

The newly elected president of the
Louisiana Sheriff's Association says adding technology to the sheriff's department will be a priority for him. St. Charles Parish's Sheriff Greg Champagne says technology is an integral part of the department's operations and should be readily available. "The law says we have to register sex offenders, but about half the departments in the state are still filing paper documents and fingerprints with State Police," Champagne states. To remedy the problem, Champagne says efforts are underway to "get all the departments on the same sex offender [reporting] program." As part of the effort, all of the departments will move to new 700 MHz radio systems so that first responders from various agencies can communicate, and email alert systems will be implemented for residents to let them know when criminals are in their area.
http://www.nola.com/timespic/stories/index.ssf?/
base/news-4/1184833711296930.xml&coll=1

"Watching You: Downtown Camera Proposal Gains Momentum"
Daily Progress (07/18/07); Rosen, Seth

Charlottesville, Va.,
law enforcement are backing an approximately $300,000 proposal that would install cameras downtown to monitor high-crime areas. Police say aside from circumventing potential crimes in the area, the cameras would also assist in investigations. Councilors say that they need more information about the placement and monitoring of the cameras before reaching a decision, but in light of eight assaults that have taken place downtown in the span of two months, the proposal is gaining momentum. "Whether [the public's safety concerns] are real or perceived, we have a responsibility to try to address it in as many ways as we possibly can," said Police Chief Timothy J. Longo. Although councilors noted that some residents might cite privacy issues as reasons for preventing the surveillance, they say public safety should rank above those concerns. The exact method for monitoring the cameras is still up for discussion, but Longo said the surveillance footage would only be used by law enforcement. Longo also said real-time should be used to stream the footage, yet such technology is also more costly. Charlottesville has no current deadline for receiving the bids or voting on the cameras.
http://www.dailyprogress.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=CDP/MGArticle/
CDP_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1173352040076&path=

"Pepper Spray: Is the Hot Stuff Still Relevant in Our High-Tech Electronic World?"
Police and Security News (06/07) Vol. 23, No. 3, P. 65; Ijames, Steve

The use of pepper spray made with Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) became widespread among the majority of U.S.
law enforcement agencies by 1992, and its use is still relevant today. Tests conducted in the late 1990s by the International Association of Chiefs of Police and the University of North Carolina found that OC-based sprays are generally safe and effective and that just two of 63 proximal deaths over a period of five years could be attributed to pepper spray. The report also concluded that pepper spray helped reduce injuries among officers as well as suspects, slashed complaints of excessive force, and was used to successfully handle resistance in 85 percent of the cases where it was used. Compared to TASERs, pepper spray is more affordable, priced at about $12 per officer. The newer versions are also more effective, based on evidence that pain is a result of the portion of capsaicinoid in the product and that cone-shaped delivery units require less accuracy compared to conventional spray tools. Pepper sprays are also effective for cases that go beyond the TASER and when multiple suspects are present. One of the newest pepper spray products is the TigerLight, which features a super-bright light and a concealed blast of pepper spray on the handle end. The device is intended for one-handed use and a study by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Office indicates that compliance among suspects was achieved by deputies in 98 percent of the cases when it was used. http://www.policeandsecuritynews.com

"Interoperability: A 21st Century Name for an Evolving Requirements in Ocean City, Maryland"
Sheriff (06/07) Vol. 59, No. 3, P. 11; Dimaio, Bob

For Ocean City, Md., the meaning of interoperability indicates being able to instantly communicate with people from other agencies, departments, or areas via dependable and high quality service. For example, the governments of Ocean City and Worcester County, Md., distribute separate radio systems that link together via a system-to-system network connection. The radios' programming allows them to work on either system. Every Ocean City radio also features extra channels from the National Public Safety Planning Advisory Committee (NPSPAC) designed to let incompatible radios communicate. A countrywide initiative has been launched to build repeater coverage using these channels, and
Maryland is spearheading the effort through projects such as the Maryland Eastern Shore Interoperability Network (MESIN). MESIN provides interoperability to counties through such 800 MHz NPSPAC mutual aid channels as 8Call, 8TAC-1, 8TAC-2, 8TAC-3, and 8TAC-4. MESIN is an IP-based network that features gateways, routers, and a fully redundant switch, utilizing 12 tower sites across Maryland's Eastern Shore for disparate personnel with 800 MHz equipment. In 2006, Ocean City added a self-contained Mobile Command Vehicle that has a stand alone 4 channel trunked radio site that can work in conjunction with or in place of the Ocean City Trucked System. More than 100 portable radios are stored ready for use. Another system that enables interoperability is the ACU1000 Interconnect System that can link low band, VHF band, UHF band, military band, 800 MHz band, and wireless phones; modifications in the field for radios can be made as needed using onboard hardware and software. http://www.sheriffs.org

Wednesday, July 25, 2007

North Carolina Cops

Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three police officers from police departments within the state of North Carolina.

From 1985 to 1988, Dr.
Grover Maurice Godwin was a police officer for the Oxford Police Department (North Carolina). He left the Oxford Police Department to pursue his education. After completing his undergraduate and graduate work in the United States, he went to England “where he studied in a one of a kind criminal psychology program at the University of Liverpool. Dr. Godwin is first American to hold a Ph.D. in Investigative Psychology. His expertise and scientific research in areas of psychology, serial killers, criminal behavior, and linking unsolved crimes distinctly sets him apart from the vast number of criminal profilers who rely on intuitive based opinions.” In addition to his teaching at university and his forensic consulting business, he is the author of five books: Tracker: Hunting Down Serial Killers; Hunting Serial Predators; Slave Master, True murder story of Internet Serial Killer; Criminal Psychology and Forensic Technology: A Collaborative Approach to Effective Profiling; and, Hunting Serial Predators: A Multivariate Approach to Profiling Violent Behavior.

According to the book description of Tracker: Hunting Down Serial Killers, “
Maurice Godwin uses inductive analysis, environmental psychology, behavioral psychology, crime site information, and other factors to create the most accurate psycho-geographical profiles available. In Tracker, we learn that "[Godwin's] work is based on the collection and critical analysis of over 100,000 data points and 200 different crime scene actions that could be used to profile the killer." Godwin explains, "Instead of relying on interviews with murderers, I studied specific pieces of behavioral information available from the crime scene or case file to develop a psychological profile of the killer and to pinpoint where he lives." Godwin further states, "I’m more interested in getting in the killer’s shoes rather than his mind."

Jon Goodman is a former police officer for the Lumberton Police Department (North Carolina); and, the founding President of that department’s Police Benevolent Association. During his post law enforcement career he has been a private investigator, record producer, radio announcer and investigative journalist in the Philadelphia area. Jon Goodman is the author of The King of Novelty.

According to the book’s description, The King of Novelty “is
Jon Goodman's revisionist epic for posterity of his father, legendary novelty artist and sampling pioneer THE KING OF NOVELTY is Jon Goodman's revisionist epic for posterity of his father, legendary novelty artist and sampling pioneer Dickie Goodman, a man contending with internal conflict and familial obligations while entertaining the world.”

Guilio Dattero has been with the Reidsville Police Department (North Carolina) since 1982, where he currently serves as Captain of Detectives. He is a graduate of the University of North Carolina-Greensboro and the FBI. National Academy. He is the author of Bloody November.

According to the book description of Bloody November, “Detective Clark Dixon, recently divorced, is fed up with his job. Nothing’s going right. But when a ruthless gang strikes Stuartsboro, Dixon rises to the challenge; and, he’s in for more than he knows. His hopes ride high on crucial evidence collected at the scene of a brutal robbery, yet when it’s sent to the state lab, the results get falsified. Foul-up or conspiracy?”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 662
police officers (representing 293 police departments) and their 1418 books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Tuesday, July 24, 2007

Over 1400 Cop Books

Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. With addition of a police officer from New Jersey and a police officer from North Carolina, Police-Writers.com now lists 1411 books written by state or local police officers.

Daniel R. DelBagno is a retired captain of police with the Newark Police Department (New Jersey). Currently he is President and Director of Research of the Princeton Educational Research Institute, on of 'the largest and most effective law enforcement entrance and promotional schools in the United States.

Daniel DelBagno is involved in the preparation and administration of law enforcement entrance and promotional tests and is considered to be an expert in the field of law enforcement testing. Daniel DelBagno has written over thirty books in the criminal justice field. He co-authored his most current book, The New Age of Police Supervision and Management: A Behavioral Concept.

According to the book description of The New Age of
Police Supervision and Management: A Behavioral Concept, the book is “packed with the authors' 60 years of time-tested leadership expertise, this managerial gold mine is filled with the knowledge you need to accelerate your career and earn the supervisory positions you aspire to! Easy-to-understand and logically segmented for long-term retention, this guide leaves no stone unturned on the road to higher rank...from detailing the key traits of successful supervisors and understanding the complex world of human behavior to practical advice for gaining respect from the troops and handling difficult, real world challenges within the ranks, from drugs to racial tension.”

Daniel DelBagno’s other works include Crime Investigation Quizzer; Police Sergeant Exam; Police Sergeant Exam: A Step by Step System to Preparing Your Promotional Exam; Attorney General Guidelines Quizzer; Law Enforcement Manual; New Jersey Criminal Justice Code: Attorney General Guidelines Quizzer: and, A Question and Answer Study Guide; Promotional Test Questions.

Brian Voncannon is a retired Deputy Sheriff from Cabarrus County Sheriff's Office (North Carolina). A former SWAT team member, he is medically retired from the Cabarrus County Sheriff's Office. Brian Voncannon is also honorably discharged from the United States Army (R) where he served as an infantryman an drill sergeant. When he is not writing, he is involved in martial arts or making handmade Native American crafts. Brian Voncannon is the author of five books: Cherokee Blue Eyes: Keeping the Heritage Alive; Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Living With the Unknown; Shadows: Diary of a Ninja; Completing the Circle: The Hathcock Indian Blood; and, Living Behind the Shield: A Modern Warrior's Path to Bravehood.

According to the book description of Living Behind the Shield: A Modern Warrior's Path to Bravehood, “this book offers the reader a glimpse into the very soul of a
law enforcement officer. From the rigors of training to the effects that this career can have on the officer, this book will enlighten the reader whether involved in this field or not. Many unknown burdens of wearing the badge are covered from the author’s own experiences. Although shocking, the realities of law enforcement are revealed from the "driver’s seat". The main thrust of this book is the challenge that officers face each day; however, a message of hope encircles the final chapter. Individuals seeking a career in law enforcement will find the content educational, while veteran officers will see that they are not alone in their daily battles.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 659
police officers (representing 290 police departments) and their 1411 books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Thursday, July 19, 2007

Military Books

Military-Writers.com is a website committed to listing military personnel who have authored books. The website added to servicemembers: Steven Rogers and Steve Schnabel.

Lieutenant
Steven L. Rogers is a 30-year veteran of the Nutley Police Department (New Jersey) and a 21-year veteran of the United States Navy Reserve, serving his country during the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, and the War on Global Terrorism. He is a former member of the FBI National Joint Terrorism Task Force, and presently serves as a police lieutenant on the Nutley Police Department. Lieutenant Steven Rogers is the author of America’s Homeland Warriors; 21st Century Policing: Community Policing : A Guide for Police Officers and Citizens; and, Cops and God; Soldiers and God; Marines and God; and, Sailors and God.

According to the book description of America’s Homeland Warriors, “From Beirut and Baghdad to Los Angles and New York, the war on
terrorism knows no boundaries. What is your police department doing to prevent a terrorist attack in your city? Do the police officers in your community know about the terrorist groups roaming your streets? Steven Rogers answers the above questions and explains what kind of terror is being spread by violent terrorist organizations worldwide and how these organizations plan to bring their terror to America. He shares with police officers how they are now part of a new joint war fighting force that will confront a new brand of “criminal warrior” never seen before on the streets of America.”

Steve Schnabel is the former Colonel of the Medina Police Department (North Dakota). Steven Schnabel graduated from the North Dakota Law Enforcement Training Center in April of 1981. He is also a staff sergeant for the North Dakota Army National Guard of which he has been a member for over 19 years.

Steve Schnabel is the co-authors of It's All About Power. According to the book description, “It's All About Power is a true and accurate eye witness account of the shoot-out between Gordon Kahl and US Marshals at Medina, North Dakota in 1983.” Of the book, Senator John DeCamp (Lincoln, NE) said, “There are many problems in America today. It's All About Power is a stimulating account of the disaster at Medina, ND in 1983 which was the first in a series of similar shocking events that have rocked our nation. I would highly recommend everyone from politicians to distressed farmers and government agents to militia members read and learn from this fabulous book!”

Dr. Allen Koss, PhD (Sitting Bull College, Ft. Yates, ND) added, “The authors...have dealt with Post Traumatic
Stress Disorder for the past 16 years. This text should be a significant contribution to the education of other law enforcement officers.”

Military-Writers.com currently lists 33 current or former
military servicemembers and their 71 books.

New Jersey Cop Authors

Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added two police officers from New Jersey who have authored books: Steven L. Rogers and Michael Petrillo.

Lieutenant
Steven L. Rogers is a 30-year veteran of the Nutley Police Department (New Jersey) and a 21-year veteran of the United States Navy Reserve, serving his country during the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, and the War on Global Terrorism. He is a former member of the FBI National Joint Terrorism Task Force, and presently serves as a police lieutenant on the Nutley Police Department. Lieutenant Stephen Rogers is the author of America’s Homeland Warriors; 21st Century Policing: Community Policing : A Guide for Police Officers and Citizens; and, Cops and God; Soldiers and God; Marines and God; and, Sailors and God.

According to the book description of America’s Homeland Warriors, “From Beirut and Baghdad to Los Angles and New York, the war on
terrorism knows no boundaries. What is your police department doing to prevent a terrorist attack in your city? Do the police officers in your community know about the terrorist groups roaming your streets? Steven Rogers answers the above questions and explains what kind of terror is being spread by violent terrorist organizations worldwide and how these organizations plan to bring their terror to America. He shares with police officers how they are now part of a new joint war fighting force that will confront a new brand of “criminal warrior” never seen before on the streets of America.”

Michael A. Petrillo is a retired chief of police from the Belleville Police Department (New Jersey). He has co-authored several books with Daniel R. DelBagno, a retired Captain from an unknown law enforcement agency in New Jersey. Among the books they co-authored are The New Age Of Police Supervision And Management: A Behavioral Concept and The New Jersey Title 2C Quizzer: A Question and Answer Study Guide of the New Jersey Code of Criminal Justice. They are also co-editors of the LearningExpress Police Sergeant Exam.

According to the book description of The New Age Of
Police Supervision And Management: A Behavioral Concept “Packed with the authors’ 60 years of time-tested leadership expertise, this managerial gold mine is filled with the knowledge you need to accelerate your career and earn the supervisory positions you aspire to! Easy-to-understand and logically segmented for long-term retention, this guide leaves no stone unturned on the road to higher rank…from detailing the key traits of successful supervisors and understanding the complex world of human behavior to practical advice for gaining respect from the troops and handling difficult, real-world challenges within the ranks, from drugs to racial tension.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 654
police officers (representing 285 police departments) and their 1396 books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Wednesday, July 18, 2007

Four Police Writers


Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added four police officers: Ronald Pinkston; L. Ken Rogers; Frederick T. Martens; and, Justin Dintino.

Ronald Pinkston was a senior corporal for the Dallas Police Department. He is the author of A Police Officer That's What I'll Be! Ronald Pinkston’s book drives home the simple point that children can rely on police officers to help them when they are hurt, lost, or in danger. According to the book description, “this is a story of a little boy who continues to need help after he climbs up a tree and wonders what he would be. The boy later realizes what he wants to be after being helped throughout the day by police officers Garcia, Roper and Smith.”

L. Ken Rogers is a 21 year veteran of law enforcement. He is a medically retired from the Pleasant Ridge Police Department (Michigan). Ken Rogers is the author of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Police Officers Report. According to the book description, “a police officer in Pleasant Ridge, Michigan was desperate and wide open to emotional pain. On the outside he looked all right, but he wasn't. His post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms were classic. He was emotionally ill. This book is a must for law enforcement agencies and personnel throughout the country.”

After a distinguished career combating crime with the New Jersey State Police, Frederick T. Martens retired at the rank of lieutenant. He then served as Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Crime Commission. He is the co-author of Police Intelligence Systems in Crime Control: Maintaining a Delicate Balance in a Liberal Democracy.

Frederick T. Martens’ co-author was Justin J. Dintino, a retired Colonel with the New Jersey State Police was also the 10th superintendent of the agency. He served as superintendent of the New Jersey State Police for four years, beginning in 1990. He is also the author of The Structure of Organized Crime in New Jersey.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 652 police officers (representing 285 police departments) and their 1387 books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Monday, July 16, 2007

History, Law and New Fiction

Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website add three police officers: Hal Brown; Thomas J. Russo; and, Angelo DeLeon.

Hal Brown was a member of the Keene Police Department (New Hampshire) for 28 years. He is the author of In Pursuit of Justice: A History of the Keene Police Department. The book was published by the Keene Benevolent Association in 1995. A copy of the book is available in the New Hampshire State Library. According to the book description, Hal Brown’s book is a, “history of the Keene Police Department from its founding in the late 18th Century and also a chronicle of criminal activity in the area.”

Thomas J. Russo is a graduate of the FBI’s National Academy and the Secret Service Dignitary Protection School in Washington, D.C. He is the recipient of a Certificate in Criminal Justice Education from the University of Virginia and a graduate of the Certified Public Manager Course of the State of New Jersey. Thomas Russo is published his autobiography Street Kid to Top Cop in 2005.

Angelo DeLeon has 30 years of law enforcement experience. He is a retired sergeant from the Fairfield Police Department (Connecticut). Currently, he is the manager of a software company. Angelo Deleon is also the author of A Summary of U.S. Supreme Court Decisions for Correctional Services: 2002/2003.

On May 9, 2007, Retired
Nassau County Police Department police officer Robert P. Como published his third book, No Greater Love. According to the book description, “This high-octane adventure story follows the life of a spiritually tormented man on the road to redemption.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 646
police officers (representing 284 police departments) and their 1378 books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Saturday, July 14, 2007

Las Vegas Cops

Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three police officers from the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department: Kim Thomas, Gordon Yach and Harry Fagel.

Kim Thomas is a detective with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, currently assigned to the forgery detail. His other investigative assignments included a joint operation with the FBI targeting an organized crime group of Eastern Europeans who defrauded $34 million from stolen credit cards. Kim Thomas, a former U.S. Air Force enlistee has also been a construction worker, limosine driver and worked in executive protection. In 1992, at the age of 36, Kim Thomas entered the police academy. A sixth-degree black belt in Katai-te Ryu karate, Kim Thomas scored 100 percent on the Metro physical test even though he was one of the older members of his police academy class.

Kim Thomas is the author of the novel Vegas: One Cop’s Journey. According to the book description, “Cam Madden had a good job and a carefree bachelor lifestyle when he impulsively tried out for the police academy of the Las Vegas PD. Now that he's mastered the theories of law enforcement his education in its realities begins with field training and an ugly suicide call. Learning the lessons of the street leaves scars on Cam's ego, but it's even rougher on his off-duty relationships with women. It doesn't matter until he falls for Karrie Mae, a paramedic, whereupon making it work becomes all important. Their romance grows in a world of burglars, bums, purse snatchers, drug dealers, and homicidal idiots, no two of them alike but each to be dealt with according to endless regulations, some of which cannot work without being severely bent.”

Gordon Yach is a 27 year veteran of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department and Clark County Sheriff’s Office. During his career, he worked patrol, detectives, vice, narcotics and intelligence. He rose through the ranks and eventually retired as the Director of the Detention Services Division. He is the author of Las Vegas... a Cops View Of... the Glamour, Glitz, Graft, Good & Evil of Sin City.

Harry Fagel has lived in Las Vegas for 30 years. He is a Police Officer with Las Vegas Metropolitan police Department. According to Harry, he has also been a “bartender, a black jack dealer, a college student, and a madman.” Harry Fagel is the author of Street Talk. According to the book description, “Take a ride with Officer Harry Fagel through the streets of Las Vegas as he weaves his black and white from glass - littered alleys to high end mega-resorts pausing along the way to show you a world from the emotionally charged, highly visual perception of a street cop gone poet or maybe poet gone street cop.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 640
police officers (representing 281 police departments) and their 1367 books in six categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.