Criminal Justice News

Monday, February 25, 2008

Leadership

A recent Amazon customer review of Leadership: Texas Hold ‘em Style

“I write
police promotional textbook exams and assessments for a living [...]. I'm always seeking out new and cutting edge books in the fields of police supervision, management and leadership.

So, I was very pleasantly surprised after I finished reading this unique
leadership book. It presents an impressive amount of information on leadership in a fun and interesting format - with liberal use of relevant and humorous quotes, experiences and analogies. Your retention of the material will be extremely high because of the author's unique writing style and the attention-grabbing format. Both authors are highly qualified and experienced to present this material - but that's not the primary reason you should consider this book. If you are in law enforcement, entering law enforcement or looking to advance your law enforcement career, this book not only covers the basic leadership experience in a way that is lively and interesting, it makes you relate to and almost experience the hardcore, daily struggle all law enforcement supervisors and managers have with how to select, train and "grow" quality law enforcement personnel.

It took a lot of guts to write a
leadership book in such a unique format. And guts is what you'll need in Poker .. and in Leadership ... and this book, if nothing else, will make you see how you can embody these leadership skills.”

More Information
www.pokerleadership.com

Over 1800 Police Books

February 23, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three NYPD authors who brought the total number of books by police officers to over 1800.

Steven Gure is a former New York City Police Department police officer and the author of Life: A True Story. According to the book description, “His is a remarkable story. Born into a family of wealthy European Jews, Steven found his life filled with horror and upheaval after the Nazi occupation of his native Lithuania when he was five years old. All of his family except his older sister, Ann, perished in the Holocaust. Eventually, Steven and Ann managed to make their way to the United States, where further insecurities awaited in the form of a series of foster homes, orphanages, and the like. With determination and perseverance, however, Steve managed to survive and even to prosper. He served in the military, worked his way through college, got married and had children, and joined the New York City police force.

Stephen Leinen is a former New York City Police Department lieutenant. After leaving the NYPD he became a professor of sociology at Manattan College. Ulitmately, in 2006 he retired as the Chair, Department of Sociology, Manhattan College. Stephen Leinen is the author of Gay Cops and of Black Police, Whie Society.

According to Publisher’s Weekly, “In the first book-length study of gay
police officers, Leinen, a sociologist, author of Black Police, White Society and a former NYPD lieutenant, reports on the coping and surviving strategies of 41 homosexual New York City police officers, both male and female. The author, who is heterosexual and was on the force when he began this study, attended Gay Officers Action League meetings, dances and gay pride parades. He describes the tense passage from being a law enforcement agent who potentially threatens the secrecy of gay officers still in the closet to being a researcher observing their lifestyle.”

William Majeski had a 21 year career with the New York City Police Department where retired as a Detective. His law enforcement expertise encompasses a vast array of criminal and internal investigations, from Homicides through to Political Corruption. During his tenure as an NYPD Detective, William Majeski focused on complex Investigations. Periodically, he took on other assignments; serving as a Panel Member of the Civilian Complaint Board, as a Delegate for the Detective Endowment Association and was selected as a Committee Member to evaluate current and develop new departmental investigative procedures.

William Majeski has a BS Degree from John Jay College of Criminal Justice and is a graduate of the FBI National Academy. Over the years he has successfully completed numerous complex investigations, becoming a recognized specialist in areas of corporate litigation, white-collar crime, internal corruption, personal solutions and interviewing techniques. He developed the Power Interview. William Majeski is the President of Majeski Associates Inc., an Investigative Firm in operation since 1988, creating solutions and serving the needs of clients worldwide. He is the co-editor of Corporate Investigations and the author of The Lie Detection Book.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 856
police officers (representing 382 police departments) and their 1802 police books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Contact Information:
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Sunday, February 24, 2008

Contract Instructors Wanted

International Tactical Officers Training Association (ITOTA)

The ITOTA is an international association designed to offer quality, professional academic and practical training. The ITOTA recognizes the need to expand and share tactical knowledge by focusing on the wealth of information and experience that exists in the global
tactical community. The ITOTA is currently seeking qualified, experienced instructors to instruct tactical courses for military, law enforcement and corrections located at CONUS and OCONUS locations. ITOTA instructors will be assigned to and mentor specific courses during established instruction periods and will be deployed to various training sites globally.

MORE INFORMATION
http://www.criminaljustice-online.com/forum16/1090.html

Criminal Justice Authors

February 23, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three NYPD authors who made significant contributions to the field of criminal justice.

Joseph Fink’s 30 year law enforcement career with the New York City Police Department culminated with his retirement at the rank of Deputy Inspector. Joseph Fink received his education at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and would return there after his retirement to serve as a professor of Police Science. Joseph Fink is the co-author of The Community and the Police: Conflict or Cooperation.

Lloyd George Sealy became a New York City Police Officer in 1942. While working full-time he earned a BA degree in sociology and a law degree from Brooklyn law School. In 1962, Lloyd George Sealy was promoted to the rank of captain and he ultimately became the first African American New York City Police Officer to take command of a precinct in Harlem. In 1966, he became the first African American Chief Inspector and the first African American commander of the Brooklyn North Patrol Area.

In 1969,
Lloyd George Sealy left the NYPD to become an Associate Professor of Law and Police Science at John Jay College. Later, he would serve three terms as the chair of that department at John Jay College. Lloyd George Sealy is the author of The Problems of Black Police Executives and Minority Recruitment for the State of Tennessee, Department of Safety; and, the co-author of The Community and the Police: Conflict or Cooperation.

Robert Gallati, a depression era lawyer, turned to police work as an alternative to hard times. When he began the police academy, he already had a law degree from Fordham University and a Master’s from St. John’s University. By 1962, he had risen to the rank of Assistant Chief Inspector and was named the NYPD Chief of Planning.

In 1964, he took a leave of absence from the
NYPD to become the first director of the New York State Identification and Intelligence System. For the next eight years he developed the computerized fingerprint system that would become the model for the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Robert Gallati returned to the NYPD, retiring in 1973. He then served as a Deputy Police Commissioner in Mount Vernon (New York) and later as a the Chief of Police for the Brockton Police Department (Massachusetts). Robert Gallati died in 1996. He is the co-author of Introduction to Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice and co-author of Criminal Interrogation; and, the author of Introduction to Private Security and A plan for the Utilization of Lieutenants as Platoon Commanders in Selected Precincts in the Police Department, city of New York.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 853
police officers (representing 382 police departments) and their 1798 police books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Contact Information:
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Saturday, February 23, 2008

NYPD Academics to Gunfighters

February 23, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three NYPD cops who have looked at law enforcement from the street as well as from the classroom.

Jim Cirillo was a member of the New York City Police Department Stake-Out Squad. According to one biographer, “his job was to confront the worst in the criminal world. He lived through no less than seventeen separate shootouts. He was involved in many more armed confrontations. He later moved on to U.S. Customs. After retirement from law enforcement, Jim Cirillo took up writing. His book, Guns, Bullets, And Gunfights: Lessons And Tales From A Modern-Day Gunfighter is a compilation of articles he wrote over the years.

According to the book description of Guns, Bullets, And Gunfights: Lessons And Tales From A Modern-Day Gunfighter, “As member of the
NYPD, Jim Cirillo survived more gunfights than Wild West legends Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson and "Wild Bill" Hickok combined. Learn what it takes to survive a real gunfight from someone who's been in many - Jim Cirillo, top gun in the New York City Police Department stakeout unit. Read about the stress and intensity of an actual shoot-out and how to maximize your training, ammo and weapons to prevail.”

John Eterno has been employed by the New York City Police Department for over 20 years. As Commanding Officer of the Mapping Support Unit, he makes policy recommendations and handles sensitive assignments for the Deputy Commissioner of Strategic Initiatives and the Assistant Commissioner of Programs and Policies. He is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Sociology at Queens College in New York. He has written book chapters and journal articles on various topics within the field of policing. John Eterno is the author of Policing within the Law: A Case Study of the New York City Police Department.

According to the description of Policing within the Law : A Case Study of the
New York City Police Department, “at a time when police abuses and errors make the headlines, it is important to understand just what goes into the decisions that police make when they are confronted with various crime scenarios in the line of duty. Required to respond within the law, many officers are able to respond in a legal manner to crime situations in which court decisions are written clearly and with easily applied guidelines. But what happens when those decisions and laws are written in a way that invites interpretation and varies from situation to situation? Based on a case study of New York City police officers, this important volume analyzes how officers contend with often-ambiguous laws in the face of specific crime scenarios. In addition, the author explores other influences on police decision making, including officer characteristics and attitudes, and makes policy recommendations in an effort to encourage the reinforcement of legal guidelines so that the rights of individuals are appropriately balanced with the duty to control crime.”

Frank Day retired from the New York City Police Department after 21 years of service. In May 1953, he joined the staff of the Southern Police Institute where he became the Associate Director of Training. He is the co-author, A. C. Germann (formerly of the Los Angeles Police Department) of Introduction to Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice. As of 1988, that book had gone into its 33rd printing. Frank Day is the author of Criminal Law and Society.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 847
police officers (representing 382 police departments) and their 1789 police books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Contact Information:
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Anastasia and the Ghostly Owl

Author Anita E. Wladichuk entered the workforce after graduating from the University of Western Ontario. She married, and in 1987, and put her career and educational dreams aside to raise two boys. In 2002, Anita returned to school graduating with a Bachelor of Education degree from the University of Victoria at Okanagan University College. Anita has been writing for years and finally decided to write her first book, Anastasia and the Ghostly Owl.

According to Anita, “I wrote and published a book on December 1, 2005 titled "Anastasia and The Ghostly Owl (The Choice Was Hers!)." This story is about hope, overcoming obstacles, and making choices in the face of adversity. More concretely, it is about
child abuse and how the protagonist, a young girl named Anastasia, comes to terms with it.

The purpose of this story is to reach out to as many people as possible, to present hope, to inspire, and to encourage those who have been unfortunate to have experienced unfair adversity in their life. I appear to have been successful in that goal.”

According to the book description, Anastasia and The Ghostly Owl “is about hope, overcoming obstacles, and making choices in the face of adversity. The purpose of this story is to reach out to as many people as possible, to present hope, to inspire and to encourage those who have been unfortunate to have experienced unfair adversity in their life.”

Visit her website for more information:
http://www.ghostlyowl.com/

Friday, February 22, 2008

Combating Illicit Trafficking in Nuclear

The IAEA released a reference manual that details how to prevent, detect, and respond to an incidence of nuclear terrorism. Combating Illicit Trafficking in Nuclear and Other Radioactive Material serves as a how-to booklet on several topics related to criminal acts involving nuclear and radioactive material. The 150+ page text is intended for a broad audience, including law enforcement agencies, legislators, customs and border patrol personnel, intelligence officials, emergency response teams and users of nuclear technology.

http://terrorism-online.blogspot.com/2008/02/combating-illicit-trafficking-in.html

Leadership

An Except from Leadership: Texas Hold 'em Style

You cannot survive without that intangible quality we call heart. The mark of a top player is not how much he wins when he is winning but how he handles his losses. If you win for thirty days in a row, that makes no difference if on the thirty-first you have a bad night, go crazy, and throw it all away.
Bobby Baldwin on Poker

Morale is incredibly important in any organization; it affects everything. It affects how people treat one another, their work quality and even the way in which they answer the phone. It is elusive in nature but palpable in its impact. If morale is low, it is a problem even if everything else in an organization is strong. Karl Von Clausewitz, a Prussian military general and military theorist, identified morale as a fundamental military principle. Since Clausewitz published On War, morale has developed into a concept seen as critical to organizations. Unfortunately, morale is difficult to define and in many circles has become somewhat synonymous with motivation. But, morale is not about motivation.


READ ON
http://www.pokerleadership.com/excerpt_chapter_25.html

Thursday, February 21, 2008

Public Safety Technology in the News

Texas Senator Seeks Limits on 'Untraceable' Prepaid Cellphones
The Dallas Morning News, (01/31/08), Steve Thompson

A proposal by Texas Sen. John Carona that will require customers purchasing disposable cellphones to provide ID and limit their purchase to only three cellphones is likely to make the phones less appealing to
criminal and possibly terrorists. Carona's plan also includes a provision that would require prepaid cellphone service providers to maintain phone records and make them available to police.
www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/politics/state/
stories/020108dnmetcellphones.3156e7f.html

Federal Grant to Help Launch Police Data-Sharing System
The Joplin Globe, (01/31/08), Susan Redden

Federal funding in the amount of $850,000 in addition to $700,000 in funds received in 2001 will be used to finalize a wireless information sharing system for three Missouri counties. The system will allow local
law enforcement to collaborate and share information, and when the system is completed it will connect to a statewide system. Officials hope to have the system up and running later this summer. www.joplinglobe.com/local/local_story_031231944.html

Licence Scans Tilt Odds in Our Favour
The Ottawa Citizen, (02/04/08), Dave Brown

In Canada, license plate scanning is being used not only to identify stolen cars, but also cars that are uninsured or linked to a suspended or unlicensed driver. Officials hope this effort will reflect in lower costs to insured drivers. The Insurance Bureau of Canada fully funded tests of the license plate scanning systems in Southern Ontario, Alberta, and British Columbia. Cameras mounted on
police cars scan as many as 3,000 plates an hour. Images of the plates are run through the on-board computer, which is updated constantly with information from the Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC) and the insurance industry. If there is a match, the system alerts the officer. In British Columbia, the tests were so positive they have added a police helicopter to the program.
www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/columnists/story.html?id=c6bce478-8aae-4694-83d6-4f967892bce4

New Device Could Help Rescuers Locate Missing Hikers, Skiers, Snowmobilers
7News, (01/30/08), Russell Haythorn

A new device serves to keep outdoor enthusiasts in touch, and in the event of an emergency will also help emergency services and rescuers locate the person in trouble. Spot Satellite Messenger has a simple four-button function-an on/off switch and an additional three buttons that provide status updates on the customer. The "okay" button transmits an okay e-mail/text message to family and friends; the "help" button alerts family and friends and transmits the user's coordinates, closest city information, and provides a Google map that pinpoints exact location; and finally a "911" button to be used for those instances of serious distress. Customers use their home computer to set up the messages for each of the status buttons ahead of time, as well as designate who they want to receive the messages.
www.thedenverchannel.com/news/15181175/detail.html

Traffic Scofflaws in for Rude Awakening: Technology to Leave Ticket Collectors No Place to Hide
Chicago Tribune, (02/05/08), Eric Zorn

Chicago's Department of Revenue will use automatic license plate recognition as part of a new program that includes 26 vans roaming city streets identifying vehicles with multiple unpaid parking or red-light violations. The AutoVu system allows these crews to perform their task nine times faster than the previous manual method. The slowest part is post system identification, when the crew double checks the information and applies the boot to the vehicles. This more streamlined process has provided the city a chance to redeploy 17 employees to write tickets and it is hoped to generate an increase in ticket revenue, which was estimated at $165 million last year.
www.chicagotribune.com/news/columnists/chi-zorn_05feb05,1,7581666.column?ctrack=1&cset=true

Police Go Live Monitoring D.C. Crime Cameras
Washington Post, (02/11/08), Allison Klein

In an effort to fight crime,
District of Columbia police will begin to monitor 10 to 15 of the city's 73 cameras for about 40 hours a week. Prior to the implementation of Chief C. Lanier's plan, the cameras were used as part of the investigation of a crime after the fact. The 10 to 15 cameras will be chosen based on statistics and trends for the various areas of the city. The city adopted camera surveillance almost 10 years ago to help with inaugurations and demonstrations.
www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/10/AR2008021002726.html

Speed Camera Catches Vehicles Going 100 MPH
NBC 4, (01/31/08)

The
Montgomery County Police Department has implemented the use of fixed speed-enforcement cameras in an effort to slow drivers in residential and school zones. The police were aware that they would catch some drivers going fast, but they didn't anticipate capturing images of someone going over 100 mph through a school zone. During the early morning hours of November 14, 2007, a fixed speed-enforcement camera took images of a car doing 110 mph in front of Wheaton High School, where the posted speed is 35 mph. On December 20, 2007, another camera captured a driver going 76 mph in a 35 mph zone. The use of these cameras has freed up officers to handle other issues and has earned the department $2.8 million in ticket revenue since the program began.
www.nbc4.com/news/15181421/detail.html

New ID Checks Begin
Cleburne Times-Review, (01/31/08), Lisa Magers

New procedures will be implemented by the Cleburne ISD schools in Texas in an effort to provide a safe learning environment for students and staff. The check-in procedures will have visitors present a valid driver's license or State-issued ID that office personnel will scan and check against multiple nationwide sex offender databases. If there is an issue the system will alert the office staff. Otherwise, the system uses the scanned information from the ID to produce a nametag for the visitor that includs an image of the individual's ID, a time stamp, and a reason for the visit. Another alert option available on the system relates to private alerts that are specific to individuals and to restraining orders, custody, or visitors that have been banned.
www.cleburnetimesreview.com/local/local_story_031190012.html

Essex Hopes $438K Grant Will Heat Up Cold Cases
The Star-Ledger, (02/03/08), William Kleinknecht

Funding in the amount of $438,000 from the National Institute of
Justice (NIJ), will help Essex County (New Jersey) establish a cold-case team to re-examine evidence from unsolved crimes and, where possible, apply any new, cutting-edge DNA tools that may help solve the crime. Under the President's DNA Initiative, NIJ has awarded funding for cold-case investigations in 29 States. Forgotten clues-rope, gum, cigarette butts, or a hat-may still contain some usable biological material that may be analyzed and matched to evidence found at other crime scenes or DNA obtained from a convicted criminal. It is hoped that this funding can be used to close some of Essex County's unsolved crimes.
www.nj.com/starledger/stories/index.ssf?/base/news-9/1202017039159760.xml&coll=1

High-Tech Goggles Mean
Police Won't Be in the Dark
Citizen.com, (01/31/08), Cutter Mitchell

A program used to put phased-out
military equipment in the hands of law enforcement has helped the Alton (NH) Police Department acquire PVS-7B night vision goggles. Understanding the need for such goggles in assisting in situations like burglaries or missing hikers, Police Chief Philip Smith Jr. worked with the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office of the U.S. Central Command Air Forces to attain the equipment. The value of a pair of the night vision goggles is between $3,500 to $4,000; however, through the program the goggles were donated at no cost. With that in mind the department is exploring the possibility of obtaining an infrared device that is larger than the one the department presently uses, which could be used with the night vision goggles during a missing person search.
www.citizen.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080131/GJNEWS02/263570658/-1/CITNEWS

Binoculars Will Aid City
Police at Night
StatesmanJournal, (02/01/08), Dennis Camire

The
Salem Police Department will be receiving $13,000 in Department of Homeland Security (DHS) grant funding toward the purchase of night-vision binoculars for the investigations department. The grant is part of 22 awards made to 22 Oregon counties at a total amount of $350,000. The DHS funding is hoped to help first responders with the management of operations and prevent or respond to terrorist events.
www.statesmanjournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2006802010305

Courts Look to Improve Availability and Reduce Paper
St. Cloud Times, (02/01/08), David Unze

At the end of February, a test will be conducted in a small courtroom in Stearns County (MN) concerning how information is shared within the courthouse. The transition will be from a system that is mostly dependant on paper to a system that will use electronic files and records to help reach a point where those involved in a case would leave with judge's orders in hand and not have to wait several weeks for those orders to be distributed. Stearns County presently has one wired courtroom that would provide lawyers the chance to leave hardcopy files at their office and rely on electronic documents during juvenile court proceedings. The county attorney transferred civil case files to electronic, and is in the process of doing the same with
criminal and juvenile records. Though a conversion to a system that is completely paperless may not be possible, the conversion could save money in staff time spent entering data, and in storage costs at the county and State levels.
www.sctimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080201/NEWS01/102010027/1009

Grant to Help County Offices Go 'Paperless'
News-Leader, (02/06/08), Dirk VanderHart

The amount of $940,000 was awarded to Green County (MO) to help the county sheriff and prosecuting attorney offices become paperless. The money is hoped to help the prosecuting attorney handle new cases digitally by early summer and the sheriff anticipates scanning warrants and records into a central database. Because all records will be electronic, deputies and local
police officers will be able to have quick access to information. To further this immediate access the funding will also be used to purchase terminals for police and sheriff vehicles and to establish a Mobile Data Terminal Network.www.news-leader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080206/NEWS01/802060406/1007/NEWS01

Wednesday, February 20, 2008

Emergency Management: Implications from a Strategic Management Perspective

This study argues the necessity for and the benefits of a strategic management approach in current emergency management systems. Strategic management is characterized as a long-term process for developing a continuing commitment to the mission and vision of an organization, nurturing a culture that identifies with and supports the mission and vision, and maintaining a clear focus on the organization's strategic agenda throughout all its decision processes and activities. Recent emergency management practice demands that more strategic approaches and management styles be utilized than before. This study addresses the following benefits of the integration of strategic management into emergency management: forward thinking, professionalization, capacity building, goal identification and achievement, increased public support, increased funding, and greater accountability. This study offers the following suggestions for fostering strategic planning in emergency management practice: centralize planning and decentralize execution, strengthen the intergovernmental response process, build cooperation among public and nonprofit organizations, provide training for operating emergency management strategic planning, and recruit professional emergency managers. Implications for future research are also presented

DOWNLOAD THE ARTICLE
http://www.bepress.com/jhsem/vol5/iss1/1/?sending=10037

Sunday, February 17, 2008

Police Under Pressure

February 18, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com, a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books, relayed the announcement of the publishing of Police Under Pressure.

Police Under Pressue is an electronic book by the Australian author Roger F. Peters PhD. Dr. Peters is a psychologist who has been in clinical private practice for over 20 years in NSW
Australia. Dr. Peters works extensively in the fields of employee assistance, trauma intervention and psychotherapy. Dr. Peters’s largest client group is police and he has written extensively in respect to their psychological health.

Police Under Pressure discusses the impact that operational
policing can have on its members and their families. It is based on the author’s experience in working professionally with more than 3,000 police over the last two decades. Why do only 5% of Police in the NSW Police Force and even other agencies reach retirement age? Some of the answers are in this book. A police officer of 17 years standing said “I thought he was talking to me”.

While this handy book is based on some sound science, it nonetheless weaves together the lives and experiences of so many officers that
police from any agency in the western world will relate to it well.

Police Under Pressure is a book that has also been written for those who work with police, as well as all emergency service personnel who will undoubtedly relate to the subject matter. It includes some of the approaches that Dr. Roger Peters takes with clients, especially in relation to
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. He poses the question “is it only PTSD? What about occupational burnout?”

Police Under Pressure takes the reader from a person’s motivations for entering career
policing, the academy, then explains the accumulative affects of police work on them psychologically, emotionally, physically and spiritually. In addition, the resources and treatments available that can help police are fully explored. Importantly, the impact of stress on relationships is also discussed as well as the strategies needed if marriage is not to become a secondary casualty of police work. Finally, the major themes of resilience and ultimate skills of survival are taught.

This easy to read book will certainly assist families of
police officers who may sometimes struggle to understand the changes in mood and attitude that so often occur among those who serve us, and who are involved in “civilian combat” and deal with human tragedy on an every day basis.

The book is an electronic book available from
www.heas.com.au. Other books written by Dr. Roger Peters include: Managing the Impact of Trauma and A Wish Before Dying. These books are also available electronically from the web site, also.

Police-Writers.com now hosts 842
police officers (representing 382 police departments) and their 1777 police books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Eyes, Indians and Covert Ops

February 17, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. The website added three police officers, bringing the total number listed to 842.

A graduate of Hunter College in 1950,
John Barry joined the NYPD in 1951. John Barry finished 65th on the Civil Service list of 25,000. He served as a patrolman on foot and patrol car in the 34th Precinct in Upper Manhattan. His good arrest record moved him to Detective Division where he was assigned to the Narcotics Squad, which eventually became the Narcotics Division. John Barry resigned in 1959 after a rather violent disagreement with a superior officer. John Barry became a Long Island school teacher, retiring in 1987. John Barry is the author of Baskets of Eyes.

According to the book description of Baskets of Eyes, “They were standing there in the drizzle. Some uniforms, policemen and women, and the detectives, precinct and homicide; Bronx Homicide because the woman’s body lay in the Botanical Gardens near the old Fordham Road entrance.”

J. P. Morgan, D. Min., has nearly 40 years of law enforcement experience. He began his career with the New York City Police Department where he rose to the rank of detective. He would then go on to spend time as a FBI Special Agent Supervisor and Chief in a municipal Police Department. Additionally, Dr. J. P. Morgan has been a tenured Associate Professor of Police Management and Chairman of the Department of Criminal Justice at Virginia Commonwealth University, and Director of the Police Science Division at the University of Georgia. J. P. Morgan is the author of two books: Redistribute Values Not Wealth: For a More Rewarding Life’s Journey and The Copper Indian.

According to the book description of The Copper Indian, “
Police work is fun, and unorthodox, in the 1950s and '60s. The booking of a dead man; making a prisoner pay for his taxi ride to jail; and the disappearance of a corpse are all part of a day's work.”

Bob Delaney has been an NBA referee for the past twenty years. In the 1970’s, he was a highly-decorated New Jersey State Trooper who went undercover for nearly three years to infiltrate the Mob, and was the principal undercover operative in the landmark investigation, Project Alpha. Bob Delaney is the author of Covert.

According to the book description of Covert, “Delaney’s account takes readers behind the scenes to show how law-abiding businesspeople were intimidated and extorted by cutthroat teams of mobsters eager to cut competitors out of the action.

Phil Duran has been in law enforcement for over 19 years. He has been a member of the Bernalillo County Sheriff's Department (New Mexico) for the past 18 years. Currently, Deputy Phil Duran is the Advanced Training Coordinator for his department. His is author of Developing the Survival Attitude and co-author of Tactical Attitude. He has recently authored Duran Advanced Role-Play Training System.

According to the book description of Duran Advanced Role-Play Training System, “the reader will learn to employ safe, effective training scenarios that will maximize learning and increase officer preparedness. Learn to: Avoid training accidents and injuries, Effectively use training props, make role playing more realistic.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 842
police officers (representing 382 police departments) and their 1777 police books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Contact Information:
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Sunday, February 10, 2008

Police Corruption

February 8, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) The February 13, 2008 program of Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole focuses on Police Corruption with special guest Lieutenant Stephen Beeler, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (ret.).


Program Date: February 13, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic:
Police Corruption
Guests: Lieutenant Stephen Beeler
Listen Live: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

About the Guest
In 1962,
Stephen Beeler joined the United States Army, serving in Germany. After his discharge in 1965, he joined the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. During his law enforcement career he served in patrol, administration, court services, community relations, press liaison and hostage negotiations. In 1986, he retired because of a duty-related injury. From 1987 to 1995, he was the business manager for the Arizona Department of Corrections in Winslow. Stephen Beeler has a Masters Degree from Pepperdine University at Malibu and a Masters Certificate from Loyola University, Los Angeles. Stephen Beeler is the author of The Firestone Syndrome.

About the Watering Hole
The
Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Tuesday, February 05, 2008

Book and Author of the Year Announced

February 4, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) Police-Writers.com is a website that lists state and local police officers who have written books. Police-Writers.com announced the 2008 Book of the Year and 2008 Author of the Year.

What Every Chief Executive Should Know: Using Data to Measure Police Performance, (Looseleaf Law Publications, 2007) by Captain
Jon M. Shane (ret.), was selected as the 2008 Police-Writers.com Book of the Year. In December 1985, Jon Shane Joined the Newark Police Department (New Jersey) and was assigned to the South Police District. During his 20 year law enforcement career, he worked a variety of assignments and worked his way through the ranks of detective, sergeant and lieutenant, eventually reaching the rank of Captain.

Jon Shane’s book stood out among the entrants because it significantly advances management decision making in the field of law enforcement. The book provides models and mathematical approaches to management questions like: “How many officers do we need? Are we efficiently using the ones we have? Is there a relationship between the number of officers we have and our crime rate? What is the status of our patrol car fleet? Are citizens satisfied with our work? What is the cost of our special programs and what are the actual benefits?”

One Police-Writers.com judge noted that
Jon Shane’s book “took a daunting subject and broke it down into pieces that anyone could understand and put to use. Not only did he give simple and easy to understand explanations, he also provides examples of types of data and how to work with that data to make intelligent decisions. Plus, he provides a CD with ready-to-use Excel spreadsheets for an executive to use right away.” A second judge noted, “Shane’s book goes beyond the use of math to solve management questions in policing. The hidden value in the work may be that it demonstrates new ways of thinking about crime. Potentially, it could help put the word “analysis” back into “crime analysis.”

James H. Lilley was selected as the 2008 Police-Writers.com Author of the Year. The author of the year selection was based in part on writing ability and in part on career and community service.

James H. Lilley began his lifetime as a United States Marine in 1961. Shortly after his discharge, he joined the Howard County Police Department (Maryland), graduating first in his class. During his career his received numerous honors such as Medal of Valor, four Bronze Stars, four Unit Citations and the Governor’s Citation. James H. Lilley has published six novels, articles in Police Chief Magazine and authored an International Association of Chiefs of Police training key. Moreover, he began studying Martial Arts in the early 1960s and is a 8th Degree Black Belt in Shorin Ryu Karate; the first American to achieve this recognition and honor from Sensei Takeshi Miyagi.

James Lilley submitted as an example of his work The Eyes of the Hunter (PublishAmerica 1997). One of the Police-Writers.com judges said of James’ writing, “He is a mature writer with strong plot, character and story development.” Another judge said, “easy to read, and it was very good escapism. The writer has some absolutely beautiful passages wherein he describes a sound or a vista. The sex scenes are pretty hot, too.”

Police-Writers.com now hosts 839
police officers (representing 382 police departments) and their 1772 law enforcement books in 32 categories, there are also listings of United States federal law enforcement employees turned authors, international police officers who have written books and civilian police personnel who have written books.

Contact Information:
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Saturday, February 02, 2008

Computer Crime

February 2, 2008 (San Dimas, CA) The February 6, 2008 program of Conversations with Cops at the Watering Hole focuses on Computer Crime with experts Thomas Eskridge and Jeff Fischbach.

Program Date: February 6, 2008
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic:
Computer Crime
Guests: Thomas Eskridge and Jeff Fischbach
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

About the Guests

Thomas Eskridge
Thomas Eskridge began his
law enforcement career as a reserve police officer for the Santa Ana Police Department (California). In January 1980, he joined the Compton Police Department (California), rising to the rank of sergeant. In 1990, he joined the joined the Redondo Beach Police Department (California), and retired at the rank of Lieutenant.

Thomas Eskridge as a Bachelor’s Degree, is a POST certified instructor in
Computer Crime Awareness; a POST certified investigator of Computer Crimes and Sexual Assaults. Currently, Thomas Eskridge is the Chief Operations Officer of the High Tech Crime Institute in Tampa, Florida.

The
High Tech Crime Institute is a leading provider of training for Local, State and Federal agencies worldwide. Recognized as the global leader in the field of High Tech Computer Crime Investigation and Computer Forensics and provides expert instruction and proactive security management to both the private and public sectors.

Jeff Fischbach
Jeff Fischbach is a Board Certified
Forensic Examiner. In 1994, he founded the SecondWave Information Systems, a technology consulting firm.

Jeff Fischbach has served as a key
technology advisor to more than a dozen professional organizations. As a litigation consultant and expert witness, Fischbach has shared his technological expertise with judges, attorneys and their clients. “Invaluable,” and able to “explain sophisticated computer concepts in a clear, understandable and concise way,” said one attorney.

Jeff Fischbach has worked closely with the Los Angeles
Computer Crimes Division of the FBI, consulted with the Danish Consulate, and, frequently quoted, has become a recognized authority among members of the press. Jeff Fischbach has aided in the investigation and apprehension of computer criminals and has assisted in the successful defense and exoneration of those wrongly charged with computer crimes and misconduct. His strength lies in his ability to master new concepts, interpret and apply data, and, ultimately, train his audience.

About the
Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant
Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in law enforcement, public policy, technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in law enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole.
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement

Program Contact Information

Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Friday, February 01, 2008

National Language Service Corps

The Department of Defense (DoD) announced today that is has begun recruiting for the National Language Service Corps (NLSC) Pilot, a public civilian organization composed of volunteers engaged on-call to provide diverse language services across a broad range of local, state and federal government departments and agencies. The opportunities for service will vary from emergency relief to international crises to immediate national need—wherever language skills are needed.

“This is an excellent opportunity for Americans with unique language skills to serve their country, when and where they are needed the most," said Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness David S.C. Chu.

During the pilot, a team of nationally recognized experts is developing, testing, and evaluating the prototype concept of operations, potentially leading to a plan for a fully operational NLSC in fiscal 2010. The pilot includes recruiting and enrolling 1,000 charter members with competency in ten languages important to national security and welfare of the nation. The following languages have been identified so far: Hausa, Hindi, Indonesian, Mandarin Chinese, Russian, Somali, Swahili and Vietnamese. The operational concept for employing these languages is being examined and refined during three activation exercises. The director, National
Security Education Program (NSEP) is coordinating the participation of federal agencies as partners for the three activation exercises. The final two languages will be identified when the exercise plans have been completed.

The National Language Service Corps Pilot, authorized by Congress in 2006, represents a vital new approach to address the nation's needs for individuals with highly developed language skills. It is an integral component of the Defense Department's comprehensive language roadmap and the President's National
Security Language Initiative.

The pilot corps will include two pools of certified language capable individuals. The "national pool" will consist of a broader array of talent that will be maintained to be drawn upon during times of need. The "dedicated pool" will be a smaller cadre of individuals who enter relationships with sponsoring organizations and who agree to be available to those organizations should the need arise.

U.S. citizens interested in volunteering, or seeking more information, should call 1-888-Say-NLSC (729-6572) or go to http://www.nationallanguageservicecorps.org .