Criminal Justice News

Thursday, May 28, 2009

How to Undress a Cop

On June 12, 2009, Conversations with American Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion with author Sarah Cortez and Liz Martínez.

Program Date: June 12, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: How to Undress a Cop
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/06/13/How-to-Undress-a-Cop

About the Guest
Sarah Cortez has been in law enforcement since 1993. During her career she has worked as a patrol officer, field training officer and sexual assault investigator. After her writing career began, she continued in law enforcement as a reserve police officer and been assigned as a juvenile bailiff, worked undercover during alcohol stings and assisted with the service of civil processes. Sarah Cortez is the author of How to Undress a Cop: Poems and a coauthor/editor of Hit List: The Best of Latino Mystery.

Liz Martínez’ short stories have appeared in the anthologies Manhattan Noir, Queens Noir, and Cop Tales 2000, and in publications including COMBAT: the Literary Expression of Battlefield Touchstones and
Police Officer’s Quarterly. Her short story “Kris Kringle” was Orchard Press Mystery’s Christmas 2000 feature. She is also the author of the non-fiction book The Retail Manager’s Guide to Crime and Loss Prevention, and her articles about security and law enforcement have appeared in publications around the world. She is a member of Mystery Writers of America, Sisters in Crime, Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers, and the Public Safety Writers Association. She and Sarah Cortez are also co-editors of the anthology Indian Country Noir from Akashic Books (Brooklyn).

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in Law Enforcement, public policy, Public Safety Technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in Law Enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/06/13/How-to-Undress-a-Cop

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Crime Mapping Research Conference Solving Problems With Geography and Technology

August 19 – 22, 2009
New Orleans, La.
Sheraton Hotel

Solutions to crime and public safety problems involve a combination of research, practice, technology and policy. Law enforcement agencies now often use geography to help solve crime and other public safety problems.

Advancements in geographic technologies are helping law enforcement agencies understand crime more completely, deploy public safety resources more efficiently, and examine criminal justice policies critically. Geographic research leads to better practices and technological advances. Research provides a theoretical foundation; practice, through technology, puts theories into operation. Research and practical demonstrations help focus policy decisions.

The Crime Mapping Research Conference is about understanding crime and public safety and their effect on communities. The conference presents a range of research findings, practical applications, technology demonstrations and results that can shape future policies.

Presentations and workshops for the 10th conference will highlight geographic principles in research, geographic applications in practice, technology demonstrations and solutions for crime and public safety problems.

MORE INFORMATION
http://guest.cvent.com/EVENTS/Info/Summary.aspx?e=c9e87fa2-759d-4bb3-a42d-91841ca7dfa2

Friday, May 22, 2009

Criminal Justice Technology Center of Excellence for Information and Sensor Systems

Application Deadline: June 19, 2009 11:45 PM eastern time.

NIJ is seeking applications to establish a Criminal Justice Technology Center of Excellence for Information and Sensor Systems within the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center System (the "NLECTC System"). The Information and Sensor Systems Center will provide testing, evaluation, technology assistance, and other services with regard to information and sensor technologies intended for use by law enforcement and other criminal justice agencies.

MORE INFORMATION
http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/sl000873.pdf

Thursday, May 21, 2009

Leadership: Texas Hold'Em Style - by Harvey & Foster - A Leading Questions review

Editor's Note: Both authors are retired law enforcement.

There are many different kinds of leadership books in the marketplace. The most prevalent kind are books written by business school academics and biographies of leaders. Each has their value, but for practicality, the majority do not translate well into practice. Then there are books that are written by practitioners. This is what I found when I came across Andrew J. Harvey and Raymond E. Foster's Leadership: Texas Hold'em Style (www.pokerleadership.com).

READ ON
http://edbrenegar.typepad.com/leading_questions/2009/05/leadership-texas-holdem-style-by-harvey-foster-a-leading-questions-review.html

Monday, May 18, 2009

Predictive Policing Analytic and Evaluation Research Support

Application Deadline: July 13, 2009 11:45 PM eastern time.

NIJ's Office of Research and Evaluation (ORE) is requesting proposals to provide analytic and evaluation support, as well as independent evaluation services to applicants selected for funding in the planning phase of the OST Predictive Policing program. Predictive policing includes strategies and tactics that improve the situational awareness of law enforcement concerning individuals or locations before criminal activity occurs. In a separate solicitation entitled, "Predictive Policing Demonstration and Evaluation Program," the NIJ Office of Science and Technology (OST) is seeking applications from State and local law enforcement agencies or regional law enforcement information centers to conduct planning activities leading to the demonstration of predictive policing methods in practice. Applicants selected under the OST Predictive Policing Program solicitation will be required to collaborate with program evaluators to design and monitor the predictive policing models as ! they are developed, implemented, and rigorously evaluated.

MORE INFORMATION
http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/sl000879.pdf

Sunday, May 17, 2009

First Annual Lake Erie Law Enforcement Expo.

The Expo will be held on August 11-13, 2009 at the Bayfront Convention Center, in Erie, PA. The Expo will host exhibitors from across the country, representing the full array of products and services that are crucial to today’s Law Enforcement. Attendees will get an up close and personal look at the latest technology, latest training and best equipment out there.

Take part in three days of non-stop learning and networking with Law Enforcement Professionals from a wide range of agencies and locations. On Weds. August 12, meet and learn from LT. COL. DAVE GROSSMAN, U.S. Army (Ret.) Director, Warrior Science Group, www.killology.com. Lt. Col. Dave Grossman is an internationally recognized scholar, author, soldier, and speaker who is one of the world's foremost experts in the field of human aggression and the roots of violence and violent crime.

He is the author of On Killing, which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize; has been translated into Japanese, Korean, and German; is on the US Marine Corps’ recommended reading list; and is required reading at the FBI academy.

The Expo would like to invite all Law Enforcement Professionals to be part of this kick off event at The Bayfront Convention Center in Erie, PA on March 12, 2009 at 10 AM. If you are interested in being a part of this exciting event contact: Duane Stehlar at 716-937-6704 or 716-866-5960, or Jackie Albarella at 883-7620 for more information.

Saturday, May 16, 2009

Female Suspects: They Can Hurt You!

We have all done it, felt way to relaxed when dealing with a female suspect. We're big, bad, tough cops right? Whether we are male or female, we often tend to let our guard down when dealing with a female. We are the ones in uniform; that makes us ten feet tall and bulletproof, Yes? Especially you male officers, a woman isn't going to be able to hurt you right?

READ ON
http://www.police-writers.com/articles/hawkes_female_suspects.html

Police Can Now Update Radios Without Taking Them to the Shop

Police are increasingly using new technology to update their radio equipment, saving their departments precious time and money. Over-the-Air maintenance, or OTA, allows police departments to update radio software and change a radio's features by beaming the updates directly to the radios. OTA has been available to military and cellular networks for years. The technology is especially helpful in regional emergencies where public safety organizations need to communicate effectively across state and county lines.

READ ON
http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/topics/technology/communication/otar.htm

Industrial Security Protection

On May 29, 2009, Conversations with Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion on Industrial Security Protection with former Army Captain Jeffrey W. Bennett.

Program Date: May 29, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Industrial Security Protection
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/05/30/Industrial-Security-Protection

About the Guest
Jeffrey W. Bennett, ISP is a former Army Officer with experience in intelligence, security and logistics. He is also an accomplished author with periodical, novel and non-fiction book credits. His book, ISP Certification-The Industrial Security Professional Exam Manual has helped security professionals better understand their profession as well as earn their certification.

Jeffrey W. Bennett is ISP certified with certificate number 117. He writes books on national security to offer peers, professionals and students resources to improve their skills and ability to safeguard classified material. His primary goal is to train security professionals and decrease security violations . Jeffrey W. Bennett is an active member of NCMS (Society of Industrial Security Professional) and currently serves as the vice-chair of one of the largest chapters. Jeffrey W. Bennett is also a member of ASIS International and serves as the nomination chair for the local chapter. Jeffrey W. Bennett is the author of ISP Certification: The Industrial Security Professional Exam Manual.

According to the book description of ISP Certification: The Industrial Security Professional Exam Manual, “What can be more important than protecting our Nation's secrets? This study system offers easy to understand career advice and delivers timely information to help students, industrial security professionals and Government security specialists better understand the National Industrial Security Program. This book is perfect for
Homeland Security and Criminal Justice students, security professionals and should be in every library. Industrial security professionals serving in the government, private or DoD Contractor industry benefit by improving their study of executive orders and the National Industrial Security Operating Manual. Situations and questions throughout the book are designed to help improve security programs designed to protect classified material. In fact, many Facility Security Officers and industrial security professionals face similar situations identified in the book as they implement and direct policies to safeguard our nation’s secrets.”

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in Law Enforcement, public policy, Law Enforcement Technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in Law Enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/05/30/Industrial-Security-Protection

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Special Forces Soldier

On May 22, 2009, Conversations with Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature Master Sergeant Regulo Zapata, Jr. United States Army (ret.).

Program Date: May 22, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Special Forces Soldiers
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/05/23/Special-Forces-Soldiers-

About the Guest
Master Sergeant
Regulo Zapata Jr., USA (ret.) was an Army Special Operations NCO and retired as a Master Sergeant in 2003 after 28 years of service with the U.S. Army Special Forces. He now lives in Gilroy (California). Master Sergeant Regulo Zapata, Jr. is the author of Desperate Lands: The War on Terror through the Eyes of a Special Forces Soldier.

According to the book description of Desperate Lands: The War on Terror Through the Eyes of a Special Forces Soldier it “is the unprecedented story of U.S. Army Special Forces soldiers and the missions they have carried out while fighting the war on terror in the Horn of Africa and in Afghanistan. The book is unique and timely, in that it tells the compelling story of our nations struggle and of its soldiers fighting a new and different kind of war never fought before a Global War on Terror. This true story comes at a time when our nation has divided feelings and opinions about this war a division that exists among both government leaders and the American people. These pages offer a different perspective that of lower enlisted soldiers reflecting their personal experience in combat zones in Africa and Afghanistan as they witnessed and experienced the fog of war. The author Special Forces Master Sergeant
Regulo Zapata, Jr. shares his extraordinary journey through ancient and desperate lands at the front lines of this ongoing war. Here are true stories of sacrifice, bravery, excitement, horror, anger, tedium, fear, camaraderie, and more a firsthand look behind the headlines at the reality of the exceptional and difficult challenges U.S. Army Special Forces soldiers face as they defend America against the terrorist threat.”

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in Law Enforcement, public policy, Law Enforcement Technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in Law Enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/05/23/Special-Forces-Soldiers-

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Friday, May 15, 2009

Leadership Philosophy: Expand Your Mind

Leadership comes in many different shapes and forms. As leadership comes in different shapes and forms, so does leadership philosophies. There are people from all walks of life who have their own philosophy on leadership. Who's to say which is right and which is wrong? But if you expand your mind and allow your leadership to grow, you will benefit any organization.

READ ON
http://www.pokerleadership.com/leadership_philosophy.html

Thursday, May 14, 2009

Public Safety Technology in the News

See a Crime? Text Sheriff at TIP411
Cape May County Herald.com, (04/28/2009), Joe Hart

Cape May County, N.J., introduced new technology on April 24 that enables anyone with a cell phone or computer to provide anonymous information to the sheriff's office through text messaging. Tipsters can send a message to TIP411that will enable real-time, two-way chat between the tipster and the sheriff's office. The technology also allows tipsters to attach photos or videos. Tips can also be submitted online at www.cmcsheriff.com. A third-party company removes the phone number from all messages and replaces it with an ID number before the message reaches the sheriff's office. Cape May County is the first sheriff's office in New Jersey to use this anonymous two-way texting technology.
www.capemaycountyherald.com/article/49344-see+crime+text+sheriff+tip411

Police Department Unveils Crime Tracking System, Twitter
Dunwoody Crier, (04/29/2009)

The Dunwoody (Ga.) Police Department and CrimeReports.com recently joined together in a new online crime alerting and mapping service to provide automated alerts and near real-time crime incident maps to area residents. Crime incident data is updated every night. The free service can be found at http://www.crimereports.com or on the Dunwoody Police Department Web site at http://www.dunwoodyga.gov/. Residents can sign up for daily, weekly or monthly e-mail alerts regarding crimes reported near their home, work or school locations. The police department also has joined Twitter, the real-time, short messaging system. Citizens can use Twitter to receive instant updates as the department posts information.
www.thecrier.net/articles/2009/04/29/front/atwitter.txt

County Crime Mapping Program Puts Stats in Citizens' Hands
Desert Dispatch.com (05/01/2009), Beatriz Valenzuela

Citizens living in San Bernardino County are now able to log into to a Web site maintained by the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department to view information on crime in their neighborhoods. The Community Crime Mapping program is a first for southern California; it compiles crime data from each of the sheriff's stations and uses Google Maps and another geographic tool to show the locations of recent criminal activities. The system excludes the city of Barstow, which has its own police. Residents can either look at crime near a specific address or throughout an entire city. They can also sign up to receive crime alerts via e-mail. Information remains in the system for 90 days.
www.desertdispatch.com/news/mapping-5992-bernardino-program.html

Utah's Department of Natural Resources Deploys FATPOT Solution
Urgent Communications, (05/04/2009), Mary Rose Roberts

The Utah Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has begun offering a global, common operational picture to dispatched personnel for wireless field reporting via a mobile interoperable solution called Portal One. The FATPOT Technologies software-based tool offers a single repository for all public safety data and gives field personnel access to computer-aided dispatch and records management (RMS) systems and the ability to share vital information with other public safety agencies. A mobile-based software suite automates functions and provides tools that can be used from remote locations, including an instant messaging tool. The agency can also now participate in a statewide interoperable network linking 130 public safety agencies.
urgentcomm.com/mobile_data/news/fatpot-solution-utah-portal-one-20090504/

DHS Begins Deploying Technology Component of Its Virtual Fence
NextGov, (05/08/2009), Jill R. Aitoro

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is installing a series of networked towers equipped with cameras and sensors as part of a project to monitor a section of Arizona's border with Mexico. SBInet, if fully funded, will eventually extend the technology along the entire Arizona border by 2011. DHS has nearly completed construction of a 670-mile fence along the U.S. southwestern border, and is now turning to adding technology. The initial phase, Tucson-1, includes installation of 200 ground sensors and nine towers equipped with day- and night-time cameras and radar. The equipment connects to eight microwave relay towers that can transmit images to a command-and-control system, which in turn will collect and integrate data.
http://www.nextgov.com/nextgov/ng_20090508_8167.php

Mass. Criminal Database Deemed Public Safety Risk
Information Week, (05/08/2009), K.C. Jones

The outdated criminal justice information system used by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts hinders efforts to obtain information on criminals and crime, State Auditor Joe DeNucci has stated. A recent audit of the Criminal History Systems Board showed that the 25-year-old system is not capable of using fingerprints to verify criminal history or reconciling arrests with court dispositions. The board maintains records on criminals, missing and wanted people files, drivers and vehicles, and firearms licenses for use by law enforcement, prosecutors and courts. In a recent test, the system failed to identify 38,000 cases in which there had been convictions. Failure to use fingerprints to verify criminal information allows criminal charges to be entered against the wrong person, either through error or when an individual intentionally provides false information. The system allows access by unauthorized users and queries that have no legitimate work purpose, the audit indicated. ! DeNucci said the system had become outdated in part because of a lack of funding; the board has recently received funding to modernize the system and expects the work to be completed within two years.
www.informationweek.com/news/security/government/showArticle.jhtml

New York City Streamlining 911 Call Taking Process
Government Technology, (05/07/2009), Elaine Rundle

New York City plans to implement unified call taking, a technology-and-training way to streamline its 911 process. Previously, if someone called 911, a police department call taker determined the type of incident and initiated a conference call with the fire department if needed, before the information in turn was relayed to fire dispatch. The new system enables the initial call-taker to handle both fire- and law enforcement-related phone calls and share the information electronically. The goal is to get emergency response to the incident faster. The first phase of the project, involving cross-training and combining computer-aided dispatch systems, was implemented in early May. New York City's Emergency Communications Transformation Program is an initiative to enhance call taking and dispatch operations for its police, fire and emergency medical services departments.
www.govtech.com/gt/articles/663164?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Digital%20Communities_2009_5_11

Utah, San Jose Deploy Crime Analytics Tool
Government Technology, (05/07/2009), Andy Opsahl

Statewide, Utah has deployed a Web-based crime analytics tool called Command Central from vendor CrimeReports. Command Central uses analytics on reports of criminal activity and then maps crime trends, "hot spots," and peak times when selected crimes occur most frequently. The tool also offers mapping of the most recent crime incidents by beat or service area, pairing them with a visual map, and can compare (for a given date range) the number of incidents of specific crimes in various areas, trends and frequency of incidents. The system has been designed to be compatible with all law enforcement reporting systems. The city of San Jose, Calif., is in the process of installing Command Central in its cruisers to enable officers to get analytics in real time.
www.govtech.com/gt/articles/661996?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Digital%20Communities_2009_5_11

Dallas Police Department's Fusion Center Outsmarts Criminals
The Dallas Morning News, (05/08/2009), Scott Goldstein

Detectives in the Dallas Police Departments intelligence-gathering and analysis unit, one of 70 federally funded fusion centers nationwide, plays a critical role in crime solving by quickly analyzing and disseminating information to officers in the field. Dallas reported a 10-percent drop in crime last year and a nearly 19-percent decrease in the first quarter of 2009. Intelligence gathering operations such as this one received strong federal support following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The centers' main goal is to improve the swift analysis and sharing of intelligence to identify potential terrorist threats. However, in Dallas and in other cities, fusion center duties have broadened to include day-to-day crime solving.
www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/localnews/crime/stories/DN-fusion_09met.ART0.State.Edition1.4c8622a.html

L-1 Installs Full-Hand ID Biometrics System in Texas
Washington Technology (05/07/2009), David Hubler

L-1 Identity Solutions' Biometrics Division will upgrade the existing L-1 TouchPrint live scan system used by the state of Texas to include full hand scanners in addition to electronic finger and facial images. These images will be sent to the statewide automated fingerprint identification system (AFIS). Adding high-quality full hand images will improve matching accuracy, according to L-1 representatives. The improved system will also bring Texas into fuller compliance with the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006, which established a comprehensive national system for the registration of sex offenders and offenders against children. Local jurisdictions are required to include a photo, fingerprints and palm prints in the offender registry.
washingtontechnology.com/articles/2009/05/07/l1-installs-full-hand-id-biometrics-system-in-texas.aspx

Wednesday, May 06, 2009

Fed Undercover - Contract Killer; Weapons Dealer; Pedophile

On May 15, 2009, Conversations with Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a discussion Special Agent Bob Hamer, FBI (ret.) on his career as an undercover federal agent.

Program Date: May 15, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Fed Undercover - Contract Killer; Weapons Dealer; Pedophile
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/05/16/Fed-Undercover-Contract-Killer-Weapons-Dealer-Pedophile

About the Guest
Special Agent
Bob Hamer, Federal Bureau of Investigation (ret.) spent 26 years as a “street agent” for the FBI; many of those years undercover. As an uncover agent he posed as a drug dealer, contract killer, fence, pedophile, degenerate gambler, weapons dealer, and white-collar criminal.

Bob Hamer worked undercover against such diverse groups as La Cosa Nostra, the Sicilian Mafia, Mexican Mafia, Russian Mafia, Asian organized crime groups, and Los Angeles-based street gangs. His successful infiltration of NAMBLA (North American Man/Boy Love Association) resulted in the arrest of what one defendant called eight members of the “inner circle.” He received numerous awards throughout his career including the FBI Director’s Award for Distinguished Service, four United States Attorney Awards for Distinguished Service, and numerous letters of commendation including one from then U.S. Attorney Rudy Giuliani. Bob Hamer is the author of The Last Undercover: The True Story of an FBI Agent’s Dangerous Dance with Evil.

According to the book description of The Last Undercover: The True Story of an FBI Agent’s Dangerous Dance with Evil, “
Bob Hamer tells the story of his life as an undercover agent for the FBI posing as everything from a drug dealer to an aging pedophile. Looking back on a career rich in the kind of action that makes for great cinema, Hamer describes the challenges he endured as he stared the dark side of humanity in the face.”

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the
Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in Law Enforcement, public policy, Law Enforcement Technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in Law Enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/05/16/Fed-Undercover-Contract-Killer-Weapons-Dealer-Pedophile

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530

Sunday, May 03, 2009

Choosing the Right Team

Note: This is an excerpt from Sergeant Greg Doyle's new book, The Stinging Salve, due for release on June 20, 2009. Greg Doyle is a 28-year veteran of the Upland Police Department, Upland, California.

Thoughts on Status Quo Leadership


When I was a kid, the Hans Christian Andersen classic "The Emperor’s New Clothes" became a favorite of mine not only because someone important was walking around naked (a very funny notion to a ten-year-old boy), but also because the emperor in the story was oblivious to the fact he was being duped by people he trusted. Though the story was written for children, on closer inspection it is clear Mr. Andersen was really addressing serious issues in life, which we all would be wiser to heed.

As the story goes, the emperor was very concerned about outward appearances, so much so that he insisted on wearing very elegant clothing, which he changed every hour. The word of this strange behavior spread all over the Kingdom, until two scoundrels heard about it. They devised a scheme to approach the emperor and pose as two expert tailors, who would craft an outfit unparalleled by any clothing of that day. In fact, the material used would be “invisible” to anyone too stupid to see its beauty and quality.

The emperor was hooked in by the scam. Soon he was paying great sums of money for visits by the two scoundrels, who displayed the invisible cloth for the emperor’s approval. Not wishing to be thought stupid, the emperor began to believe the invisible material was really there. Soon all of his advisors and counselors followed suit (excuse the pun.) With the emperor’s money in hand, the scoundrels fled town. Meanwhile the emperor paraded himself around publicly in his newly acquired suit. Oddly enough, it took a little boy to point out that the emperor was indeed naked.

Status quo leadership tends to be static. Most often, chief executives surround themselves with subordinate leaders who generally agree with them. Unfortunately, choosing subordinate leaders like oneself creates an enormous (and often incestuous) blind spot, which usually translates into miscommunications, misunderstandings, mistakes, and missteps all along the chain of command. Rather than doing what is in the best interests of the organization, status quo leadership becomes more interested in protecting its own power by suppressing subordinates who do not agree with them. Communist and fascist regimes of the last century are stark examples of status quo leadership models at their worst.

Generally speaking, status quo leadership becomes most vulnerable (naked) when it fails to acknowledge the dissenting voice within the organization. Most often, the dissenting voice is the person or group closest to the problem at hand, with the least amount of power to affect change within the organization. Some organizations spend inordinate amounts of time trying to suppress dissent. Usually, suppression creates resentful martyrs, grudging grumblers, and chronic complainers.

Other organizations choose to simply ignore dissenters, most often to their inevitable embarrassment. One can only wonder if the famed vessel Titanic would have survived her maiden voyage had the interest in crossing the Atlantic safely in warmer waters been the real objective, rather than crossing the ocean in record-breaking time.

It may be helpful at this juncture to point out what dissent should look like within any organization. Dissent should never have as its objective the confiscation of power, the overthrow of leadership, or any adverse undertaking that could dismantle or destroy the integrity of the organization. Sinking the organization creates casualties, invites interference from outside influences, and undermines confidence in the organization from its clientele and the general public. One need only remember the losses suffered in the Titanic disaster to appreciate keeping the organization afloat no matter who is at the helm.

Ideally dissent should be the ability to respectfully voice constructive disagreement and be heard. Such dissent should be welcomed within the organization without reprisal and with an
attentive ear by leadership to revisit or address any perceived disparity. For example, if your organization was planning a huge outdoor company picnic and spent thousands of dollars in
preparation, wouldn’t it be a good idea to listen to the voice of dissent who pointed out all weather reports predicted a massive thunderstorm for the day of the event? Has anybody ever eaten soggy potato salad?

Does this mean all constructive dissent should be received by leadership without prejudice? YES! Does it mean every constructive dissent will result in an immediate change in marching orders? No. Positive change within any organization requires a well-communicated and shared vision, thoughtful planning, re-tooling and training, feedback, and a timetable for future implementation. What it could translate into over time is a greater participation in the organization by subordinates and less micro-management from the top of the organization down. It could also mitigate much of the “Us versus Them” mentality which plagues organizational effectiveness.

To whom did Jesus pass the reins of power in his organization? Would you believe Christ initially promoted uneducated fishermen? No one had credentials. No one had experience. One could hardly call Jesus’ selection of subordinates status quo leadership. Jesus selected followers not on the basis of appearance, but on their respective aptitudes and attitudes. Jesus looked to the heart and character of the person, not their ability to pay lip service. The record of the gospels indicated the Apostles were hardly corporate “yes men” by any standard. They were chosen to become servants.

With nearly two thousand years of recorded history on the books, it is clear that Jesus knew how to select the right people for his organization. Jesus had a vision, a message, a mission, and a purpose just like most organizations on the planet, past and present. He effectively selected his executive team, shared his vision with them, and gave them simple instructions for success, while leaving them in charge of His Father’s business. All that was required was to trust in their founder (Jesus) and follow those instructions in faith and obedience.

While there have been more than a few setbacks in two thousand years, the organization still thrives in spite of all the attempts of Christ’s competitor to put Him out of business. I cannot think of any other organization that has survived for so long, except perhaps the organization Jesus was ejected from (rather harshly) for voicing his dissent publicly.

If you believe the message of the gospels, don’t settle for the trifling, stifling static from the status quo; listen to the Word of God and allow Jesus to help your faith grow.


(excerpt from The Stinging Salve, by The Gadfly, (2009) Publish America. Baltimore, Mayrland, pp.79-83, reprinted by permission)

Saturday, May 02, 2009

Soldier, Cop, Musician and Author

On May 8, 2009, Conversations with Heroes at the Watering Hole will feature a conversation with Sergeant Gregory Allen Doyle, Upland Police Department.

Program Date: May 8, 2009
Program Time: 2100 hours, Pacific
Topic: Soldier, Cop, Musician and Author
Listen Live:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/05/09/Soldier-Cop-Musician-and-Author

About the Guest
Sergeant
Gregory Allen Doyle, Upland Police Department is currently a patrol sergeant. During his law enforcement career has served as a gang detective, street gang officer, undercover narcotics officer, school resource officer and patrol officer. Prior to entering law enforcement Sergeant Gregory Doyle served four years in the United States Army in a Mechanized Infantry Battalion.

In addition to his
law enforcement career, Sergeant Greg Doyle is a writer who has published articles in professional magazines and the author of three books: The Sting of the Gadfly; God Is Not an Option; and, The Stinging Salve.

Sergeant
Gregory Doyle writes contemporary Christian music with Associate Pastor Don Maresh (Discovery Christian Church, Moreno Valley); and, together, Greg and Don lead the Good News Praise Band at Discovery and have professionally recorded three CDs of original music: No Other God (2000- 15 songs); The God That I Love (2002 - 19 songs);
You're My God (2006 - 23 songs).

About the Watering Hole
The Watering Hole is
police slang for a location cops go off-duty to blow off steam and talk about work and life. Sometimes funny; sometimes serious; but, always interesting.

About the Host
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster was a sworn member of the Los Angeles Police Department for 24 years. He retired in 2003 at the rank of Lieutenant. He holds a bachelor’s from the Union Institute and University in
Criminal Justice Management and a Master’s Degree in Public Financial Management from California State University, Fullerton; and, has completed his doctoral course work. Raymond E. Foster has been a part-time lecturer at California State University, Fullerton and Fresno; and is currently a Criminal Justice Department chair, faculty advisor and lecturer with the Union Institute and University. He has experience teaching upper division courses in Law Enforcement, public policy, Law Enforcement Technology and leadership. Raymond is an experienced author who has published numerous articles in a wide range of venues including magazines such as Government Technology, Mobile Government, Airborne Law Enforcement Magazine, and Police One. He has appeared on the History Channel and radio programs in the United States and Europe as subject matter expert in technological applications in Law Enforcement.

Listen, call, join us at the Watering Hole:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/LawEnforcement/2009/05/09/Soldier-Cop-Musician-and-Author

Program Contact Information
Lieutenant Raymond E. Foster, LAPD (ret.), MPA
editor@police-writers.com
909.599.7530