Criminal Justice News

Saturday, April 28, 2012

CBP U.S. Border Patrol Agents Apprehend Felon


Prior Convictions include Robbery

Tucson, Ariz. – A 30-year-old male from Mexico City, Mexico, apprehended by Naco Station Border Patrol agents in June 2011 near Naco, Ariz., was sentenced to 33 months of confinement on April 19, 2012.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office prosecuted Jose Fernando Calderon-Rodriguez following his 2011 apprehension for attempting to illegally re-enter the United States. During processing at the Naco Station, agents using the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS) learned Calderon-Rodriguez was convicted in California in 2005 for robbery and sentenced to four years in prison.

Following the Border Patrol’s initial processing, the case was submitted to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for re-entry of an aggravated felon. Calderon-Rodriguez will be formally removed from the U.S. following his 33-month incarceration and is now banned for life from any legalization process.

All illegal immigrants apprehended by the Border Patrol undergo criminal history checks using IAFIS. This vital tool accesses criminal records throughout the United States, enabling agents to quickly identify violent criminals and wanted persons.

As part of a targeted enforcement strategy, the Tucson Sector places individuals into impact programs designed to influence their decision not to commit a subsequent illegal entry. One impact program involves individuals with prior criminal convictions being prosecuted in federal court.

Customs and Border Protection welcomes assistance from the community. Citizens can report suspicious activity and remain anonymous by calling the Border Patrol at (877) 872-7435 toll free.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the unified border agency within the Department of Homeland Security charged with the management, control and protection of our nation's borders at and between the official ports of entry. CBP is charged with keeping terrorists and terrorist weapons out of the country while enforcing hundreds of U.S. laws.

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