Criminal Justice News

Friday, July 13, 2012

Springfield Woman Charged with Embezzling $400,000 from Former Employer

SPRINGFIELD, IL—A federal grand jury today returned a seven-count indictment that charges a Springfield, Illinois woman, Alice M. Foss, with stealing $400,000 or more from her former employer, a Springfield consulting and lobbying firm, as announced by Jim Lewis, U.S. Attorney for the Central District of Illinois.

The indictment alleges that Foss, 50, of the 1400 block of S. 5th Street, embezzled $400,000 or more from Don Moss and Associates, a consulting and lobbying firm that specializes in services for disabled persons and other social causes. According to the indictment, Foss was employed as the firm’s chief financial officer and assisted in the firm’s lobbying activity. In her capacity as chief financial officer, Foss had check-signing authority and control over the firm’s bank account and was responsible for paying the firm’s business expenses.

The indictment alleges that beginning as early as May 1997 and continuing to July 2010, Foss used her position at the firm to steal money and funds by repeatedly writing herself unauthorized bonus checks and reimbursements for fraudulent business expenses and repeatedly using the firm’s bank account and credit card account to pay personal expenses. According to the indictment, Foss used wire transfers and the firm’s credit card account to pay for personal expenses including car payments, donations to a private school, clothing, groceries, gas, car washes and rental, hair salon and spa expenses, and veterinary bills.

Foss is scheduled to appear for arraignment on July 31, 2012, at 11:45 a.m. before U.S. Magistrate Judge Byron G. Cudmore.

If convicted, each count of mail/wire fraud (six counts) carries a maximum statutory penalty of up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000. For credit card fraud (one count), the penalty is up to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000. Final sentences are determined by the court. In imposing sentence, the court may consider federal sentencing guidelines, which include a defendant’s criminal history, the amount of loss, and other applicable factors.

Members of the public are reminded that an indictment is merely an accusation; the defendant is presumed innocent unless proven guilty.

The charges are the result of an investigation by the U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the FBI. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Timothy A. Bass.

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